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jonandros

Tourist Visa for Relative in Peru

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My wife who came here from back in 2008 on a K3 VISA from Peru is pregnant. My sister in law (age 37 who has no kids and still lives with her mother) who resides in Peru wants to come visit her sister and new baby (after birth in October) on a tourist VISA. We are a little disturbed at the rate of tourist visa denials for Peruvians who want to come visit relatives. For example, we have a friend who just gave birth, and the grandmother was denied a tourist VISA to come visit. Does anyone know the rate of acceptance from Peru? Does anyone has a list of do's and dont's when it comes time for the interview for the person who is seeking the VISA? Is there anything this person can do to increase her chances of getting the tourist VISA. She is under the impression that its a given and we dont want to discourage her. But we are not optimistic. She is awaiting the extension of her work contract in Lima. Once she has that, she will apply for the VISA. Should she wait until her sister in the USA has her citizenship, or does that matter? Once an application is rejected, is there a greater chance it will be rejected the next time too? Anyway, I am just seeking some all-around advice about how to proceed. We don't want to waste the money unnecessarily but we want her to be able to visit.

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Morocco
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She is coming to visit a relative (you and your wife) As her brother in law you should send her a letter of invitation. I did this for my Peruivan freind and her husband and the visa was granted. Samples of letters of invtation can be found on internet. I did have all our passport informaiton, name, address, etc. on it. I did this in 2008. I also put dates or arrival and departure. [HOpe this helps.

quote name=jonandros' timestamp='1308392356' post='4730460]

My wife who came here from back in 2008 on a K3 VISA from Peru is pregnant. My sister in law (age 37 who has no kids and still lives with her mother) who resides in Peru wants to come visit her sister and new baby (after birth in October) on a tourist VISA. We are a little disturbed at the rate of tourist visa denials for Peruvians who want to come visit relatives. For example, we have a friend who just gave birth, and the grandmother was denied a tourist VISA to come visit. Does anyone know the rate of acceptance from Peru? Does anyone has a list of do's and dont's when it comes time for the interview for the person who is seeking the VISA? Is there anything this person can do to increase her chances of getting the tourist VISA. She is under the impression that its a given and we dont want to discourage her. But we are not optimistic. She is awaiting the extension of her work contract in Lima. Once she has that, she will apply for the VISA. Should she wait until her sister in the USA has her citizenship, or does that matter? Once an application is rejected, is there a greater chance it will be rejected the next time too? Anyway, I am just seeking some all-around advice about how to proceed. We don't want to waste the money unnecessarily but we want her to be able to visit.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
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She will ultimatly have to qualify on her own, to make her interview easier she should bring strong ties to Peru

now, the difference between you and the above poster is that with you, it is a family member - this is often viewed differently than simply visiting a friend

Don't assume it is a given, be prepared for the interview by showing how she MUST return. She should bring things such as a letter from her employer with an expected return date, a lease/mortgage, etc

Good luck


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My wife who came here from back in 2008 on a K3 VISA from Peru is pregnant. My sister in law (age 37 who has no kids and still lives with her mother) who resides in Peru wants to come visit her sister and new baby (after birth in October) on a tourist VISA. We are a little disturbed at the rate of tourist visa denials for Peruvians who want to come visit relatives. For example, we have a friend who just gave birth, and the grandmother was denied a tourist VISA to come visit. Does anyone know the rate of acceptance from Peru? Does anyone has a list of do's and dont's when it comes time for the interview for the person who is seeking the VISA? Is there anything this person can do to increase her chances of getting the tourist VISA. She is under the impression that its a given and we dont want to discourage her. But we are not optimistic. She is awaiting the extension of her work contract in Lima. Once she has that, she will apply for the VISA. Should she wait until her sister in the USA has her citizenship, or does that matter? Once an application is rejected, is there a greater chance it will be rejected the next time too? Anyway, I am just seeking some all-around advice about how to proceed. We don't want to waste the money unnecessarily but we want her to be able to visit.

It is quite common (actually, the norm) for tourist visas to be denied in consulates of countries that are viewed as "third world" and where there would be a high incentive for the "tourist" to overstay their visa and live and work in the US. Therefore, what will be most important will be for your sister-in-law to show strong ties to her country. This could be proved to the consul by showing titles of property or properties, title to business, job letter, bank accounts, etc. If your sister-in-law does not have these financial ties to her country, it might be likely that she would be denied. Think about it. She is young and without a husband or children (relationship ties) and if she does not have financial interests in Peru, then the consul might think that she has no reason to go back to her country. Therefore, she might be seen as a risk since it might be the case that she would overstay. Despite this, there is no harm in trying to get a visa. You and your wife can craft an invitation letter and send it to her. The consul might be convinced of your sister-in-law's good intentions.

Congratulations on your child and best wishes! (F)


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It is quite common (actually, the norm) for tourist visas to be denied in consulates of countries that are viewed as "third world" and where there would be a high incentive for the "tourist" to overstay their visa and live and work in the US. Therefore, what will be most important will be for your sister-in-law to show strong ties to her country. This could be proved to the consul by showing titles of property or properties, title to business, job letter, bank accounts, etc. If your sister-in-law does not have these financial ties to her country, it might be likely that she would be denied. Think about it. She is young and without a husband or children (relationship ties) and if she does not have financial interests in Peru, then the consul might think that she has no reason to go back to her country. Therefore, she might be seen as a risk since it might be the case that she would overstay. Despite this, there is no harm in trying to get a visa. You and your wife can craft an invitation letter and send it to her. The consul might be convinced of your sister-in-law's good intentions.

Congratulations on your child and best wishes! (F)

Sounds like you think that since she is single with no kids that she might find it hard to get the VISA? What do you think the odds are? We will still try regardless.

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Wales
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You do not try, she does.

Even if it was possible to work out the odds, there is insufficient data to do so.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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You do not try, she does.

Even if it was possible to work out the odds, there is insufficient data to do so.

:) Not exactly. I still need to write an invitation letter for her and give her the money to apply. $150

is a lot of money in Peru. Im amazed that they charge people that much money, then just deny the application.

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Wales
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But not a lot of money compared to the cost of a vacation in the US.

How much is the airfare?


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Wales
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FFS

You are not the one applying for the visa. Your financial situation is immaterial.

Go and re read Aztec's post.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Youre an idiot. Im the one who will pay for her to come visit here. Of course she will be judged on her own merit.

She does have money in the bank, enough to pay for 4 tickets perhaps to the USA. But im the one who will be paying the airfare when she comes here. So get lost!!

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Wales
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One can only hope that the Consulate take the correct course in this case.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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She can try to get the visa. The consul will ask her for the purpose of the trip, who is paying, if she is married and has kids. By experience, the consul could deny her the visa due lack of strong ties (in my case they told me a year ago that I was young and without family and for that he denied me the visa). But she could be the lucky one and get the visa too. The only thing I can advise is that she must answer the question with the truth, and if she has been working in the same company for a long time, maybe she will have the chance to get the tourist visa. Good luck!

Edited by EveJon

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She can try to get the visa. The consul will ask her for the purpose of the trip, who is paying, if she is married and has kids. By experience, the consul could deny her the visa due lack of strong ties (in my case they told me a year ago that I was young and without family and for that he denied me the visa). But she could be the lucky one and get the visa too. The only thing I can advise is that she must answer the question with the truth, and if she has been working in the same company for a long time, maybe she will have the chance to get the tourist visa. Good luck!

Ok thanks

Jonathan

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