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Name difference on K1 documents

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Ukraine
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Hello everyone, I am getting ready to send of the K1 package and hit a snafu. My Fiance is from Ukraine. We filled out all the K1 paperwork with the way she spells her name normally in Russian.

She brought up the fact that on her International passport her name is spelled differently by one letter. I am not 100% percent clear on why, but am told that at one point when Ukraine left the Soviet Union certain things changed with the alphabet and that the way her name is spelled on her International passport is actually a transliteration rather than a direct translation.

My fiance went to the passport office in Ukraine and was told the spelling is correct according to the Ministry of Ukraine. Her passport has certain sections in Russian and others and in Ukrainian. Her birth certificate is in Russian, her internal passport in Ukrainian, etc.

The character in her name is one we do not have in our alphabet. Will this pose an issue? Has anyone dealt with this and what is the best course of action? Write her name on the K1 paperwork as we would like it spelled here in the USA or spell it to match the incorrect spelling on her International passport?

Many thanks in Advance

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Philippines
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Hello everyone, I am getting ready to send of the K1 package and hit a snafu. My Fiance is from Ukraine. We filled out all the K1 paperwork with the way she spells her name normally in Russian.

She brought up the fact that on her International passport her name is spelled differently by one letter. I am not 100% percent clear on why, but am told that at one point when Ukraine left the Soviet Union certain things changed with the alphabet and that the way her name is spelled on her International passport is actually a transliteration rather than a direct translation.

My fiance went to the passport office in Ukraine and was told the spelling is correct according to the Ministry of Ukraine. Her passport has certain sections in Russian and others and in Ukrainian. Her birth certificate is in Russian, her internal passport in Ukrainian, etc.

The character in her name is one we do not have in our alphabet. Will this pose an issue? Has anyone dealt with this and what is the best course of action? Write her name on the K1 paperwork as we would like it spelled here in the USA or spell it to match the incorrect spelling on her International passport?

Many thanks in Advance

It is Ukrainian transliteration versus Russian transliteration and it is not the incorrect spelling by Ukrainian standards... The consulate in Ukraine deals with it daily and the visa gets issued in the name exactly as it appears in the international passport.

moving thread to RUB forum

Edited by payxibka

YMMV

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Don't worry about it. All her numbers are the same, right?


Русский форум член.

Ensure your beneficiary makes and brings with them to the States a copy of the DS-3025 (vaccination form)

If the government is going to force me to exercise my "right" to health care, then they better start requiring people to exercise their Right to Bear Arms. - "Where's my public option rifle?"

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
Timeline

It is Ukrainian transliteration versus Russian transliteration and it is not the incorrect spelling by Ukrainian standards... The consulate in Ukraine deals with it daily and the visa gets issued in the name exactly as it appears in the international passport.

moving thread to RUB forum

:thumbs:

Nothing to worry about, happens all the time. Payxibka is correct.


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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We had the same situation, since my wife's passport was about to expire. We changed the documents to reflect the new spelling and everything went through without a hitch. If you can, redo the paperwork with the new spelling.

If some of the documents have the old spelling, then just explain that in the cover letter.

Good luck! :thumbs:

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
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The whole name thing was sort of confusing to me as well, especially since my wife didn't have any idea either. It took me a bit to figure out the proper way to spell her name and parent's names. Another one that had me scratching my head was the signature! Over here, I always just signed my name in cursive. Over there, at least according to my wife, people don't necessarily write their exact name...they can write whatever they want. My wife had some sort of mark she always made as her "signature", so I wasn't sure if she should use that on the forms or what. In the end I just had her sign her exact name in cursive, despite what she usually did in Ukraine and that's what she does now in the States.


Wife's visa journey:

03/19/07: Initial mailing of I-129F.

07/07/11: U.S. Citizenship approved and Oath Ceremony!

MIL's visa journey:

07/26/11: Initial mailing of I-130.

05/22/12: Interview passed!

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
Timeline

The whole name thing was sort of confusing to me as well, especially since my wife didn't have any idea either. It took me a bit to figure out the proper way to spell her name and parent's names. Another one that had me scratching my head was the signature! Over here, I always just signed my name in cursive. Over there, at least according to my wife, people don't necessarily write their exact name...they can write whatever they want. My wife had some sort of mark she always made as her "signature", so I wasn't sure if she should use that on the forms or what. In the end I just had her sign her exact name in cursive, despite what she usually did in Ukraine and that's what she does now in the States.

Alla's signature looks most closely like this.... &- That's it. And her last name has 12 letters! Worked for everything we did.

We had one document that spelled her name THREE ways and NONE of them was correct (at least not how she spells it) Our son Sergey? He was randomly named "Sergey", "Sergii" and "Sergei" Makes no difference. The visa will be in the name as in the international passport. Alla does document translation and just asks the people "How do you want the names spelled?"


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Philippines
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Alla's signature looks most closely like this.... &- That's it. And her last name has 12 letters! Worked for everything we did.

We had one document that spelled her name THREE ways and NONE of them was correct (at least not how she spells it) Our son Sergey? He was randomly named "Sergey", "Sergii" and "Sergei" Makes no difference. The visa will be in the name as in the international passport. Alla does document translation and just asks the people "How do you want the names spelled?"

If you layer an ampersand, "B" & "C" on top of itself... that would be my wife's signature


YMMV

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scratching my head was the signature! Over here, I always just signed my name in cursive. Over there, at least according to my wife, people don't necessarily write their exact name...they can write whatever they want. My wife had some sort of mark she always made

We've had several lengthy discussions over this. She now signs in a cursive form of her name instead of that "mark" she used to use. Part of the reasoning is "because she's American now." The other part is she realized how dumb it was to have a signature nobody could read. "Don't you want everyone to know you're the one who signed that? What about when you're rich and famous? Nobody can read your autograph with that mark. You need folks to know it's you!"


Русский форум член.

Ensure your beneficiary makes and brings with them to the States a copy of the DS-3025 (vaccination form)

If the government is going to force me to exercise my "right" to health care, then they better start requiring people to exercise their Right to Bear Arms. - "Where's my public option rifle?"

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Russia
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If you layer an ampersand, "B" & "C" on top of itself... that would be my wife's signature

My fiancee does the same. She has no letter in her initials that looks anything like an ampersand. Yet her "mark" has what looks to my eyes like a "&". Also, and a bit :ot: my fiancee told me to just sign her name on the G-325a and was surprised when I refused. "But it's normal to sign someone else's name. I do it all the time for work." :lol: She was understanding after some discussion and wrote it off as a cultural difference.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
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My fiancee does the same. She has no letter in her initials that looks anything like an ampersand. Yet her "mark" has what looks to my eyes like a "&". Also, and a bit :ot: my fiancee told me to just sign her name on the G-325a and was surprised when I refused. "But it's normal to sign someone else's name. I do it all the time for work." :lol: She was understanding after some discussion and wrote it off as a cultural difference.

I sign Alla's name to things sometimes. I use a "spirograph"


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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I sign Alla's name to things sometimes. I use a "spirograph"

That's about what they look like!


Русский форум член.

Ensure your beneficiary makes and brings with them to the States a copy of the DS-3025 (vaccination form)

If the government is going to force me to exercise my "right" to health care, then they better start requiring people to exercise their Right to Bear Arms. - "Where's my public option rifle?"

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