Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
thaifoo

So my wife doesn't like it here

12 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

By here I mean the USA. I'm a USC and got my then fiancé here on k1 about a year and 8 months ago. Since then we've married, adjusted status, and had a child. We have a great relationship but I can see she's just not happy here. Here latelty we've been discussing options because quite frankly I'm not happy with my work situation. The 2 years before she came here I traveled to Thailand, her home country, 10 times to visit her. Since she's moved to the states I've changed my job and that doesn't allow me to travel like before. We're discussing the option of her moving back to Thailand and me going back to the job that that allowed me to travel back and forth to Thailand. The only problem is she's come love my family in the states and would like the option of coming back to visit them. Her parents are giving her land but it's not in her name yet. She had a good job at a bank and is educated but obviously left that job when she came here. She has no large sum of money in the bank either. The question I have is could she realistically get a tourist visa? I would think it would be obvious she wants to go back to Thailand by forfeiting her permanent residence status to move back to her country. Any info or advise would be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think her chances of getting a tourist visa are fairly remote, even more so since she has a USC spouse, even if she does own some land, sorry to say. If she can stick it out another year and a half or so she can get her US citizenship. Then she'll be able to come and go as she pleases. That would be by far the best bet, in the long term.

Edited by HeatDeath

DON'T PANIC

"It says wonderful things about the two countries [Canada and the US] that neither one feels itself being inundated by each other's immigrants."

-Douglas Coupland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think her chances of getting a tourist visa are fairly remote, even more so since she has a USC spouse, even if she does own some land, sorry to say. If she can stick it out another year and a half or so she can get her US citizenship. Then she'll be able to come and go as she pleases. That would be by far the best bet, in the long term.

+1 :thumbs:


11/15/10: I-130 package FEDEX'd to Chicago Lockbox

11/15/10: NSO Marriage and Birth Certificates available for pick-up at NSO

11/17/10: Receipt Date of I-130 petition at Chicago Lockbox

11/19/10: NSO Marriage Cert and Birth Cert (4x each) received by Gina in Philippines

11/19/10: CRBA package couriered to US Embassy in Manila

11/22/10: CRBA package/application including NSO BC & MC received by embassy

11/22/10: NOA1 Date

11/24/10: Electronic notification of receipt received from Chicago Lockbox

11/24/10: Embassy scheduled CRBA appointment for 12/21/2010

11/26/20: Check cashed

11/27/10: NOA1 Hardcopy received via USPS

12/21/10: Interview/Personal appearance at Manila Embassy for CRBA **approved**

01/03/11: CRBA and US Passport for daughter received by Gina via FEDEX

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think her chances of getting a tourist visa are fairly remote, even more so since she has a USC spouse, even if she does own some land, sorry to say. If she can stick it out another year and a half or so she can get her US citizenship. Then she'll be able to come and go as she pleases. That would be by far the best bet, in the long term.

On reflection, the only possible problem with this would be Thailand's attitude towards dual citizenship. If getting US citizenship would cost her her Thai citizenship, than obviously this would be a bad idea. I have no idea if Thailand is like Canada, who are perfectly fine with and don't legally acknowledge dual citizenship, or if they are more like China and India, where your citizenship is automatically voided if you acquire American naturalization. Check in the regional sub-forum here and/or see if you can find out online.

If this isn't an option than I'm out of ideas. The tourist-visa plan will virtually certainly not work, sorry to say.

Edit:

According to this: http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/31508-dual-citizenship/ , Thailand is much like Canada - their laws don't acknowledge dual citizenship either way, so it should be fine. I'd do some more digging though.

Edited by HeatDeath

DON'T PANIC

"It says wonderful things about the two countries [Canada and the US] that neither one feels itself being inundated by each other's immigrants."

-Douglas Coupland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is not my field of "expertise" but I remember that members on this board have been advised in such cases that somebody who holds a valid Green Card can exchange it for a B2.

There were members on this board who had family members who just wanted to visit a few times a year but had difficulties getting a B2. The advice was to get them a Green Card and then have them exchange it for a B2. The reasoning behind this is clear: somebody who has a Green Card has basically immigrated to the US. If this person voluntarily gives this privilege up, it means that the immigration intent ceases to exist. Therefore, there's no risk in issuing a B2.

I'm sure someone more knowledgeable than I will chime in soon.

Edited by Just Bob

There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the quick responses. After talking to my wife she said she would just tough it out until she's a able to apply for citizenship. But "just bob" brings up a interesting point for sure. Does anybody have any info on that? I'll do some more looking around. Thanks again!

Jody

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In her shoes, I would prefer the citizenship option, if only for it's certainty and permanence. A tourist visa can be revoked, or it's renewal denied. Citizenship is much more solid and permanent. Only downside is she would have to keep paying US taxes, depending on whether or not there is a tax treaty with Thailand.

The "I gave up a GC, so clearly I have no immigrant intent, so gimme a tourist visa" argument may be subject to the approval of the consular officer adjudicating the tourist visa application, rather than a matter of DoS policy. As such you may not be able to find any documentary proof of it's efficacity, just anecdotal evidence from people who've used it. As an argument, it's compelling, and may very well appear so to the CO, but I would expect them to reserve the final word on approvals, and that would feel a little risky to me.

Edited by HeatDeath

DON'T PANIC

"It says wonderful things about the two countries [Canada and the US] that neither one feels itself being inundated by each other's immigrants."

-Douglas Coupland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife is from the Philippines and it took her the better part of a year to really adjust and then there are still times when she really misses "home".

Now that she has her Green Card let her visit home for a couple of months (if possible), she'll be missing you and glad to return. It will also ease her adjustment pains here as she'll feel re-connected to her family back in Thailand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the all great responses. I actually just found she can apply for citizenship after 3 years of getting her green card bc she's married to a USC. I discussed it with her and she's terrified of going through the visa process again so we've decided to just wait it out and take the for sure route. We're actually all going to Thailand this April for 23 days and we can't wait. Hopefully after the baby gets a little older she can go on her own and stay for a few months. Right now she's scared to go alone because the baby's got some bad colic and it's a 2 person job taking care of him. Again thanks for all the insight and advice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

she might be very homesick! is there a wat within driving distance of your home? maybe she will feel more connected to home if she has a chance to speak thai etc. are you able to get ingredients for thai food? as i'm sure you know food is so important and that might help. also you can get plenty more advice from folks with thai s.o.'s in the sawasdee 4 thread in the regional forums.

good luck!


ROC Timeline

18 NOV 2010 Sent 1.8lb packet to USCIS in Laguna Niguel (day 1)

19 NOV 2010 Package signed for V SEMEGI (day 2)

24 NOV 2010 Package returned because USC didn't sign petition (day 6)

calendar reset

26 NOV 2010 Package sent out again (day 1)

29 NOV 2010 Package signed for by V SEMEGI (day 3)

29 NOV 2010 NOA1 issued (day 3)

03 DEC 2010 Hardcopy of NOA received (day 7)

07 JAN 2011 Successful walk in biometrics (day 42) original date 1 FEB

01 MAR 2011 Date on Approval notice (although it arrived after the card did) (day 94)

03 MAR 2011 Card received (day 96)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another suggestion is to join Facebook. You wouldn't believe how many Thais registered. My wife loves it. She has more friends than me!!! It's a great social network. My wife speak little English but I set her keyboard to Thai and English. She can switch between the two. I also installed translation program on her computer as well. I guess what I'm trying to say is that there are many resources out there and Facebook is a start. There is also another social network that is popular in Thailand called Hi5. Good luck.


animated%20usa%20flag1.gifanimated%20thailand%20flag.gif

Thai Style USA

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Our Links:

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=106...amp;ref=profile

https://www.facebook.com/groups/223365857736847/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/411770628885582/

http://www.thaiworldnetwork.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×
×
  • Create New...