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Messybrownhair

Can I study while AOS is pending?

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Hi all,

My K1 visa has recently been approved and I will be heading to the US this February. Our church wedding is scheduled on April 2nd. I have applied to various grad schools as well and I plan to start fall 2011. Enrollment should be around July, which might not leave enough time to have my GC in hand. So my question is, am I allowed to study while AOS is pending? Is there some kind of form I need to get? I know during AOS you can get some kind of authorization from USCIS to request for employment, is there a similar process for study? I hope someone can advice me.


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

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Thanks Nigeria!

Yes, I am aware of the tuition increase since I am an intl student :/

Just making sure I am legally allowed to study because I don't want to defer my acceptance!


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

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It depends very much on the school's regulations. You do not and should not be paying international rates, unless you're only planning on taking a class or two and don't mind paying extremely high rates by comparison.

When I asked recently, they said they either go on the date on your license or being declared on state taxes as a spouse. In my case, since we were married before December 31st, we can file jointly and so I qualify for in-state tuition as long as our state taxes are submitted before the start of the semester.

Short version goes: ask the school you wish to enroll at. You certainly shouldn't be counted as an international student, imho.

eta: I won't have my GC by the time the semester starts, but we will be declaring us on our taxes.

Edited by SunDrop

Timeline Summary:

K-1/K-2 NOA1 - POE: 9 February - 9 July 2010

Married: 17 July 2010

AOS mailed - Interview : 22 November 2010 - 10 March 2011

ROC mailed - approved: 14 February - 18 June 2013

Citizenship mailed - ceremony: 9 February - 7 June 2017

 

VJ K-2 AOS Guide

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I am confused. The thing is, my fiance is from PA and the school I applied to is in Boston, so we will both be out-of-state? I also applied to a PA school so I am hoping that I am accepted there as well (no results yet) If I am, then it will save us a lot of trouble. But the last time I checked, but I am not sure, I am not considered a PA resident until I have stayed there for a year? which means I am not considered in-state? maybe someone can correct me?

also sundrop.. just wondering... why did it take you so long to apply for aos after the wedding?


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

Share this post


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It depends very much on the school's regulations. You do not and should not be paying international rates, unless you're only planning on taking a class or two and don't mind paying extremely high rates by comparison.

When I asked recently, they said they either go on the date on your license or being declared on state taxes as a spouse. In my case, since we were married before December 31st, we can file jointly and so I qualify for in-state tuition as long as our state taxes are submitted before the start of the semester.

Short version goes: ask the school you wish to enroll at. You certainly shouldn't be counted as an international student, imho.

eta: I won't have my GC by the time the semester starts, but we will be declaring us on our taxes.

Many education institutions in the states will not give you resident rates untill you have lived in state for one year.

I know the one i am looking at enrolling at have told me that they will consider me an international student, and have to pay the much higher out of state rates, until i have been there a year.

So to the OP. You are perfectly able to enroll in a grad school without a green card in hand. You will be in the country legally, so it won't be a problem. But like me, you will probably have to endure much higher tuition rates for your first year.


ROC Timeline

4-26-13------Eligible to file for ROC

6-17-13------Sent off I-751 Package

6-19-13------VSC Received our package. Signed for by K. Fitzgerald

6-24-13------Received NOA in the mail, dated 6-20-13

6-24-13------Check Cashed

7-05-13------Received Biometrics Appointment letter in the mail for 7-18-13

7-18-13------Biometrics done

8-20-13------Case Transferred to CSC for further processing

8-24-13------Transfer notice arrived in the mail today

10-21-13----ROC Approved!

10-25-13----Received approval letter in the mail

10-28-13----Production of 10 Yr Green Card ordered

11-01-13----Card has been mailed!....Received USPS tracking number

11-04-13----10yr Green Card arrived in the mail today....Yay!!

2gsxvmz.png

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Ameribirit, thats what I was told too. The first year of grad school will be out-of-state rates :(


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

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Check the PA school for it's rules about eligibility for in-state tuition.

In Florida, if you are married to a resident who has lived in the state for the past 5 years, you will qualify for in-state tuition.

I am confused. The thing is, my fiance is from PA and the school I applied to is in Boston, so we will both be out-of-state? I also applied to a PA school so I am hoping that I am accepted there as well (no results yet) If I am, then it will save us a lot of trouble. But the last time I checked, but I am not sure, I am not considered a PA resident until I have stayed there for a year? which means I am not considered in-state? maybe someone can correct me?

also sundrop.. just wondering... why did it take you so long to apply for aos after the wedding?


Be smart, have a plan, and hang on to the people you love. - Chris Gardner

 

N-400 Timeline

02-23-2018: Sent N-400 Application online

02-23-2018: Date on NOA, retrieved from online account

02-23-2018: Date on Biometrics Appointment Letter (Biometrics Appointment at Jacksonville ASC on March 13, 10:00 a.m.)

03-08-2018: Biometrics complete

04-05-2018: Case status updated - Interview Scheduled on May 10, 2018, 10:15 a.m. :D

05-10-2018: Citizenship Interview - Passed English and Civics Tests, Recommended for Approval! :D 

06-19-2018: Received email and text notification: Naturalization Ceremony Scheduled; waited for letter to be uploaded on online account - it has been set on Wednesday, July 25, 3:00 p.m.

07-25-2018: I am now a U.S. Citizen!

 

K3-K4 Journey.txt

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Hi all,

My K1 visa has recently been approved and I will be heading to the US this February. Our church wedding is scheduled on April 2nd. I have applied to various grad schools as well and I plan to start fall 2011. Enrollment should be around July, which might not leave enough time to have my GC in hand. So my question is, am I allowed to study while AOS is pending? Is there some kind of form I need to get? I know during AOS you can get some kind of authorization from USCIS to request for employment, is there a similar process for study? I hope someone can advice me.

Imagine this question were part of the Grad School entry exam:

An international student with a student visa studies in the US with the permission of the US Government

The student gets married to a US citizen and files for Adjustment of Status from non-immigrant to immigrant afterward.

Is the student still a student even when married to a US citizen, or would she have to stop studying and go to church instead until she has become a Green Card holder?

A: She is still a student

B: She is a sinner and needs to go to church instead


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Imagine this question were part of the Grad School entry exam:

An international student with a student visa studies in the US with the permission of the US Government

The student gets married to a US citizen and files for Adjustment of Status from non-immigrant to immigrant afterward.

Is the student still a student even when married to a US citizen, or would she have to stop studying and go to church instead until she has become a Green Card holder?

A: She is still a student

B: She is a sinner and needs to go to church instead

Eh? First of all I am coming on a k1 visa, and I was just wondering because it will take me a while to get all the necessary info needed to apply for school like a ssn etc, my school itself was not sure about how to go about it since I am the first intl student in their program (communication disorders) in the application they ask me what my status is, and they are not sure if I can write "Pending GC" or something on it.

Thanks everyone!


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

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I think the school mistook my question as someone who is trying to go from tourist- student visa while in the US... I will ask again :)


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

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If you sign up for school, they will usually ask if you are a resident of the State. Although this is handled differently from State to State, most States require the applicant to have "lived" in the State for at least 6 or 12 months in order to qualify for in-State tuition. Most usually take the applicant's word for it, which is why tens of thousands of illegal aliens are studying in the US.

If you state that you are not a resident of the State, you will be charged out-of-State tuition and--if requested--will be issued an I-20 form which you can use in order to apply for a student visa.

Of course, when applying for Grad School, you'll have to provide official transcripts pertaining to your qualification.

You do not reveal how far you've come in regard to application and being accepted for school. As someone who entered the country legally with a visa, got married to a US citizen, and filed for Adjustment of Status to resident you surely can go to school, if the school plays along.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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