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The Truth about Undocumented Immigration

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Undocumented Immigrants Effect on Social Security

  • Undocumented immigrants compose about three percent of the total US population. (Josiah Heyman of the University of Texas at El Paso)
  • The estimated seven million or so illegal immigrant workers in the United States are
    now providing the Social Security system with a subsidy of about $7 billion a year. (The New York Times)
  • Immigrants contribute billions of dollars annually but receive no public pension in retirement, are not eligible for Medicare, and are not entitled to any other benefits. (Social Security Administration)
  • Most undocumented workers pay taxes, and they pay a variety of taxes. (The New York Times)
  • The money that undocumented immigrants paid in 2004 added up to about 10 percent of that year's surplus - the difference between what the system currently receives in payroll taxes and what it pays in pension benefits. (Social Security Administration)

  • The money paid by illegal workers and their employers is factored into all the Social Security Administration's projections. (Social Security Administration)
  • After the 1986 passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act, the Social Security Administration began receiving mountains of W-2 earnings reports with incorrect or fake Social Security numbers, and placed them in the "earnings suspense file." Since then, the file has grown, on average, by more than $50 billion a year, generating $6 billion to $7 billion in Social Security tax revenue and about $1.5 billion in Medicare taxes. (Center for Urban Economic Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago)
  • Many older workers return home to Latin America when they reach retirement age. (BusinessWeek)

...........

Economic Impact of Undocumented Immigrants

  • Undocumented immigrants have become a new source of economic growth as giant U.S. consumer companies like banks, insurers, mortgage lenders, credit-card outfits, phone carriers, and others aggressively market to over 11 million undocumented customers. (BusinessWeek)
  • Undocumented immigrants add 600,000 to 700,000 new consumers to the economy every year. (Pew Research Center)
  • 84% of undocumented immigrants are 18-to-44-year-olds, in their prime spending years, vs. 60% of legal residents. (BusinessWeek)
  • Allowing immigrants financial privileges boosts corporate profits because it enables them to move out of the cash economy, put their money in banks, and take out credit cards, car loans, and home mortgages. U.S. gross national product also surges because consumers with credit can spend more than those limited to cash. (BusinessWeek)
  • When more undocumented immigrants pay income and property taxes, they help ease the tax burden for others when it comes to paying for schools, health care, roads, and other services immigrants use. (BusinessWeek)
  • Letting the undocumented save and invest, could also result in a decline in crime because if immigrants are allowed to protect their money in banks, the rate of hold ups and robberies in Latino or immigrant neighborhoods drop. (Austin Police Department)
  • Immigrants benefit the economy more than they take away in social services. (National Academy of the Sciences)
  • In 2004, Arizona suffered severe labor shortages and huge quantities of lettuce went unpicked because growers lacked pickers. In 2005, the Central Valley in California had 70,000 to 80,000 labor positions that were unfilled. Legalizing workers would alleviate such labor shortages. (Benjamin Powell, economist at the Independent Institute)

  • Immigrants are one of the main labor sources for the rebuilding and clean-up effort in post-Katrina Louisiana and Mississippi. (NewAmericanMedia.org)
  • As much as half of all U.S. retail banking growth is expected to come from new immigrants over the next decade. (The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp)
  • Hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrant households earn enough to qualify for $95,000 mortgages. (National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals)
  • ITIN and conventional mortgages taken out by undocumented could be worth as much as $60 billion over the next five years. (National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals)
    Undocumented immigrants now comprise fully half of all farm laborers, up from 12% in 1990. (US Department of Labor)
  • Undocumented immigrants are 25% of workers in the meat and poultry industry, 24% of dishwashers, and 27% of drywall and ceiling tile installers. (The Pew Research Center)
  • The overall proportion of unauthorized workers in the labor force is 4.3%. Employers from many sectors of the US economy employ unauthorized immigrants – including enormous amounts of private US households. (Josiah Heyman of the University of Texas at El Paso)
  • The estimated population growth rate in Mexico is declining rapidly and may soon be slower than that in the US. (United Nations)
  • Immigrants benefit the United States economy but their potential remains hindered by current laws. They do not deplete government resources, as is widely believed. (Benjamin Powell, economist at the Independent Institute)
  • Undocumented add at least $22 billion, in total, to the economy each year, and legalizing their status would increase that amount. (Benjamin Powell, economist at the Independent Institute)

http://jifm.tamu.edu/imfacts.htm

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and it costs 100 billion a year to house them in section 8, feed their families on wica, school their anchor babies, arrrest them for drunk driving and various other offenses, etc.


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Undocumented Immigrants Effect on Social Security

  • Undocumented immigrants compose about three percent of the total US population. (Josiah Heyman of the University of Texas at El Paso)
  • The estimated seven million or so illegal immigrant workers in the United States are
    now providing the Social Security system with a subsidy of about $7 billion a year. (The New York Times)
  • Immigrants contribute billions of dollars annually but receive no public pension in retirement, are not eligible for Medicare, and are not entitled to any other benefits. (Social Security Administration)
  • Most undocumented workers pay taxes, and they pay a variety of taxes. (The New York Times)
  • The money that undocumented immigrants paid in 2004 added up to about 10 percent of that year's surplus - the difference between what the system currently receives in payroll taxes and what it pays in pension benefits. (Social Security Administration)

  • The money paid by illegal workers and their employers is factored into all the Social Security Administration's projections. (Social Security Administration)
  • After the 1986 passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act, the Social Security Administration began receiving mountains of W-2 earnings reports with incorrect or fake Social Security numbers, and placed them in the "earnings suspense file." Since then, the file has grown, on average, by more than $50 billion a year, generating $6 billion to $7 billion in Social Security tax revenue and about $1.5 billion in Medicare taxes. (Center for Urban Economic Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago)
  • Many older workers return home to Latin America when they reach retirement age. (BusinessWeek)

...........

Economic Impact of Undocumented Immigrants

  • Undocumented immigrants have become a new source of economic growth as giant U.S. consumer companies like banks, insurers, mortgage lenders, credit-card outfits, phone carriers, and others aggressively market to over 11 million undocumented customers. (BusinessWeek)
  • Undocumented immigrants add 600,000 to 700,000 new consumers to the economy every year. (Pew Research Center)
  • 84% of undocumented immigrants are 18-to-44-year-olds, in their prime spending years, vs. 60% of legal residents. (BusinessWeek)
  • Allowing immigrants financial privileges boosts corporate profits because it enables them to move out of the cash economy, put their money in banks, and take out credit cards, car loans, and home mortgages. U.S. gross national product also surges because consumers with credit can spend more than those limited to cash. (BusinessWeek)
  • When more undocumented immigrants pay income and property taxes, they help ease the tax burden for others when it comes to paying for schools, health care, roads, and other services immigrants use. (BusinessWeek)
  • Letting the undocumented save and invest, could also result in a decline in crime because if immigrants are allowed to protect their money in banks, the rate of hold ups and robberies in Latino or immigrant neighborhoods drop. (Austin Police Department)
  • Immigrants benefit the economy more than they take away in social services. (National Academy of the Sciences)
  • In 2004, Arizona suffered severe labor shortages and huge quantities of lettuce went unpicked because growers lacked pickers. In 2005, the Central Valley in California had 70,000 to 80,000 labor positions that were unfilled. Legalizing workers would alleviate such labor shortages. (Benjamin Powell, economist at the Independent Institute)

  • Immigrants are one of the main labor sources for the rebuilding and clean-up effort in post-Katrina Louisiana and Mississippi. (NewAmericanMedia.org)
  • As much as half of all U.S. retail banking growth is expected to come from new immigrants over the next decade. (The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp)
  • Hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrant households earn enough to qualify for $95,000 mortgages. (National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals)
  • ITIN and conventional mortgages taken out by undocumented could be worth as much as $60 billion over the next five years. (National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals)
    Undocumented immigrants now comprise fully half of all farm laborers, up from 12% in 1990. (US Department of Labor)
  • Undocumented immigrants are 25% of workers in the meat and poultry industry, 24% of dishwashers, and 27% of drywall and ceiling tile installers. (The Pew Research Center)
  • The overall proportion of unauthorized workers in the labor force is 4.3%. Employers from many sectors of the US economy employ unauthorized immigrants – including enormous amounts of private US households. (Josiah Heyman of the University of Texas at El Paso)
  • The estimated population growth rate in Mexico is declining rapidly and may soon be slower than that in the US. (United Nations)
  • Immigrants benefit the United States economy but their potential remains hindered by current laws. They do not deplete government resources, as is widely believed. (Benjamin Powell, economist at the Independent Institute)
  • Undocumented add at least $22 billion, in total, to the economy each year, and legalizing their status would increase that amount. (Benjamin Powell, economist at the Independent Institute)

http://jifm.tamu.edu/imfacts.htm

When the hell is this report from? 7 million illegals? HA..... try somewhere between 12 and 20 million. Which actually makes them between 4 and 5 percent of the population.

Now let's look at the fact that most of those people are indeed probably working. Our unemployment rate is 10% because these pieces of trash are here and taking our jobs, using our resources, etc. cut out 4% of the illegals, give Americans jobs, BAM 6% unemployment!


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Hey, if Steve wants to sit here and extol the benefits of using essentially slave labor, then go for it.

So Steve, since illegal immigrants are so 'beneficial' to this country just as they are, then logic would dictate that you're against amnesty?

Edited by Happy Bunny

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Hey, if Steve wants to sit here and extol the benefits of using essentially slave labor, then go for it.

So Steve, since illegal immigrants are so 'beneficial' to this country just as they are, then logic would dictate that you're against amnesty?

IMO, we should make it relatively easy for labor to flow in and out between Canada, U.S., and Mexico, as an expansion of NAFTA. Companies would be able to sponsor low skilled employees when they can reasonably demonstrate the need.

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IMO, we should make it relatively easy for labor to flow in and out between Canada, U.S., and Mexico, as an expansion of NAFTA. Companies would be able to sponsor low skilled employees when they can reasonably demonstrate the need.

That would do nothing, my friend. Part of the sponsoring process would have to be that the labor from abroad would have to be compensated the same as Americans or lawful residents and the sponsoring business would have to provide for basic health care benefits to ensure that the public isn't burdened with the cost of health care for guest labor. Once you set that minimum standard, there wouldn't be any benefit to the foreign labor and, hence, no need.

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That would do nothing, my friend. Part of the sponsoring process would have to be that the labor from abroad would have to be compensated the same as Americans or lawful residents and the sponsoring business would have to provide for basic health care benefits to ensure that the public isn't burdened with the cost of health care for guest labor. Once you set that minimum standard, there wouldn't be any benefit to the foreign labor and, hence, no need.

Exactly. It will in turn help lift Mexico's economy, which was the whole pitch of NAFTA. The free marketers wanted a free flow of goods and services between Canada, U.S. and Mexico. Low skilled labor can and should be part of the ebb and flow of market forces. We can't talk about solving the immigration problem without addressing depressed wages of low skilled labor in this country.

Edited by El Buscador

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So you care more about Mexico's economy than your own country's economy?

Move to Mexico then and spend your money there. Oh wait, they have strict immigration laws and you probs wouldn't get in :lol:

Edited by Happy Bunny

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I got to hand it to you Steven. You remember that article I posted a while back about people looking for facts to prove their point rather than letting the facts guide their views. OP is case in point. This is not some study, this comes from a group at college called: Jovenes Inmigrantes Por Un Futuro Mejor - Young Immigrants Hispanics for a Better Future. I actually find it offensive that this one group hogging the immigration system calls themselves immigrants. They bloody leeches looking out for their own #### over others.

Out of today's USAToday alone http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/editorials/2010-04-28-editorial28_ST_N.htm

0427-edit27grf.jpg

Arizona taxpayers spend hundreds of millions of dollars to educate and provide medical treatment for illegal immigrants and their children. And violence by smugglers and Mexican drug cartels has reached such proportions that Arizona's U.S. senators last week called for the National Guard to protect the state's southern border.

By the way, there are thousand of articles speaking about massive cost to counties and states. With a hell of a lot coming from CA might I add.

Edited by Booyah!

According to the Internal Revenue Service, the 400 richest American households earned a total of $US138 billion, up from $US105 billion a year earlier. That's an average of $US345 million each, on which they paid a tax rate of just 16.6 per cent.

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from Global Exchange: (excerpt)

Rethinking the Immigration Debate:

Addressing the Root Causes of Mexican Migration

The increasingly divisive immigration debate in the

United States focuses on two main strategies: on

the one hand stepped-up workplace and border

enforcement with an emphasis on the deportation

of undocumented workers; and on the other hand,

the expansion of temporary worker visa programs

with a path to legalization. But both strategies fail

to address the root cause of migration—the mass

economic displacement of Mexican workers, an

historically rooted phenomenon that has been

dramatically accelerated by the trade, investment

and labor policies associated with the North

American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

The contradictions of the NAFTA economy—

opening U.S. borders to trade and investment while

closing the door to displaced Mexican laborers who

are essential to the American construction,

agriculture and service industries—have separated

millions of families.

........

Despite the mountain of evidence that NAFTA is a

failure—growing income gaps and worker

insecurity, as well as dramatically accelerated

migration from Mexico to the United States—the

leaders of North America and their business allies

hope to extend its reach.

........

Envisioning alternatives, taking action:

Political discussion in 2008 should be focused on

devising labor, trade, and immigration policies that

address the root causes of economic insecurity and

growing migration, not on extending failed

policies.

Truly comprehensive immigration

reforms should be attuned to the interests of the

majority of workers and citizens in both Mexico

and the U.S.

Such reforms, which provide

opportunities for Mexicans as well as Americans to

prosper at home, are the only way to slow

migration and allow the U.S. to regain control over

its broken and dysfunctional immigration system.

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