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Jaysarah86

K1 Canada Birth certificate

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youll need it for the interview.


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K-1 Visa (CSC) AOS (MSC)

26.1.2014 - Started dating ||||||||| 15.9.2015 - Applied for SSN

17.1.2015 - Met for the first time | 21.9.2015 - Received SSN

26.1.2015 - Got engaged ||| 16.10.2015 - Got Married

6.2.2015 - I-129F sent |||||||||| 11.11.2015 - AOS/EAD/AP sent

11.2.2015 - NOA1 |||||| 24.11.2015 - NOA1

26.2.2015 - NOA2 |||||| 2.12.2015 - Biometrics letter received

17.3.2015 - Case sent to Jerusalem consulate|||8.12.2015 - Biometrics

13.4.2015 - Packet 3 |||||||||| 11.12.2015 - Online RFE notice

28.6.2015 - Medical x

8.7.2015 - Interview - Approved! :luv: |||||||||||| x

31.7.2015 - Visa in hand ||||||| x

31.8.2015 - POE LAX x

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It doesn't need to be notarized. Just as long as it's the long form that's official.

Make sure you order the long form one, as they won't take the short form/wallet sized card that most Canadians have.


My fiance ordered his and received it in about a week. Ontario requires a guarantor, if they actually contact the guarantor to confirm you are who you are is a hit or miss, but that is usually the one step that messes with people.

As for it in the packets, if you're just looking at the 129F, then it only needs the petitioners BC. Once you get packet 3 and 4, both of them list the Canadian citizen's birth certificate as a required item.


*More detailed timeline in profile!*
 
Relationship:     Friends since 2010, Together since 2013
 

Spoiler

Met online: June 2010
Started dating: March 20, 2013
Engaged: November 27, 2014
Married: Feburary 20, 2016



The K-1 Process:    Done in 208 days                                               
 

Spoiler

04/27/15- NOA1 Recieved                                                    
06/02/15 - NOA2 Recieved
09/22/15 - Interview       (221g for more documents (a SECOND cosponsor), see profile for more details!)                                            
11/09/15 -  ISSUED!!                                                              
11/10/15 - Passport received                                                
02/20/16 - Wedding!              


                                                
 AOS   Done in 77 days                                                                            
 

Spoiler

04/08/16 - I-485, I-765, I-131 AOS Application recieved by USCIS
04/12/16 - 3 NOA1's received in mail
05/14/16 - Biometrics for AOS and EAD
06/27/16 - I-485 Case to changed to "New Card being produced"  (Day 77)
06/27/16 - I-485 Case changed to Approved! (Day 77)
06/30/16 - I-485 Case changed to "My Card has been mailed to me!"
07/05/16 - Green Card received in mail! 

 



ROC 

05/09/18 - Mailed out ROC to CSC

05/10/18 - CSC Signed and received ROC package
06/07/28 - NOA1 

06/11/18 - Check cashed

06/15/18 - NOA received in the mail

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It doesn't need to be notarized. Just as long as it's the long form that's official.

Make sure you order the long form one, as they won't take the short form/wallet sized card that most Canadians have.

My fiance ordered his and received it in about a week. Ontario requires a guarantor, if they actually contact the guarantor to confirm you are who you are is a hit or miss, but that is usually the one step that messes with people.

As for it in the packets, if you're just looking at the 129F, then it only needs the petitioners BC. Once you get packet 3 and 4, both of them list the Canadian citizen's birth certificate as a required item.

My intention is if your birth certificate isn't in English. When you get a translation of your B C or vaccination records or a diploma it must be stamped with notary that is all. Sorry for confusion

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No it doesn't for Canada. A person who is fluent in both languages can translate, there is zero need for a notary. A notary merely checks who is really signing and witnesses the signature, they do not verify the document is truthful, or accurate.

In other countries a notary is more, but for US immigration purposes, that is all a notary does.


You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.  - Dr. Seuss

 

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