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N-400 mistakes in dates

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Need advice cos I'm totally freaking out! My interview is scheduled next week and while I was going through my n-400 form, I noticed the dates in the employment and education section are wrong. Will it be an issue during the interview? Should I inform the IO of the mistakes and request it to be corrected before we even go through the form?


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Need advice cos I'm totally freaking out! My interview is scheduled next week and while I was going through my n-400 form, I noticed the dates in the employment and education section are wrong. Will it be an issue during the interview? Should I inform the IO of the mistakes and request it to be corrected before we even go through the form?

If plus-minus 20 days or month it's not an issue, as long as you're within reasonable (approximate) time frame. If it's 3 or more months just bring an addendum-correction to the interview ( in a simple spreadsheet list everything you want to correct, just don't forget to put an alien number and the number of n400 question you're referring to). You will be able to explain it, shouldn't be an issue if you didn't do it on purpose, which I'm sure you didn't.

Good luck!

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If plus-minus 20 days or month it's not an issue, as long as you're within reasonable (approximate) time frame. If it's 3 or more months just bring an addendum-correction to the interview ( in a simple spreadsheet list everything you want to correct, just don't forget to put an alien number and the number of n400 question you're referring to). You will be able to explain it, shouldn't be an issue if you didn't do it on purpose, which I'm sure you didn't.

Good luck!

Thank you!


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To the OP: the interview is an opportunity to correct any mistakes. No need to worry, but have a list of the corrected dates and tell the interviewer that you have a couple of corrections to make when you start reviewing your application.

What my fellow responder wrote is logical, but it shouldn't be mistaken for an actual guideline; I've never read anything to indicate that the dates are supposed to be within a certain number of days or a certain number of months of the actual date. You're supposed to write down the correct dates. If you can't remember them, write down approximate dates and tell your interviewer. If he wants more information he can ask for it.


For a review of each step of my N-400 naturalization process, from application to oath ceremony, please click here.

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To the OP: the interview is an opportunity to correct any mistakes. No need to worry, but have a list of the corrected dates and tell the interviewer that you have a couple of corrections to make when you start reviewing your application.

What my fellow responder wrote is logical, but it shouldn't be mistaken for an actual guideline; I've never read anything to indicate that the dates are supposed to be within a certain number of days or a certain number of months of the actual date. You're supposed to write down the correct dates. If you can't remember them, write down approximate dates and tell your interviewer. If he wants more information he can ask for it.

Thank you. When is the best time to inform the IO about the changes? Before we start going thru the document or once we reach the part that needs to be corrected?


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Thank you. When is the best time to inform the IO about the changes? Before we start going thru the document or once we reach the part that needs to be corrected?

The go over the whole form with you and ask if everything is ok, so at the dates in question you let him make the corrections.

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To the OP: the interview is an opportunity to correct any mistakes. No need to worry, but have a list of the corrected dates and tell the interviewer that you have a couple of corrections to make when you start reviewing your application.

What my fellow responder wrote is logical, but it shouldn't be mistaken for an actual guideline; I've never read anything to indicate that the dates are supposed to be within a certain number of days or a certain number of months of the actual date. You're supposed to write down the correct dates. If you can't remember them, write down approximate dates and tell your interviewer. If he wants more information he can ask for it.

We all know and understand that the dates on an immigration document should be accuarate, and I am not saying the applicants shouldn't worry about it much. However, it is also true that one can forget some dates especially if there was a residence without lease or if an employment was long time ago at a place where they do not issue official offer letters (for record purposes). That was the point of the author's subject. I'm sure had she remember all of her dates she wouldn't have asked this question.

I know instances where my friends who did general labor jobs in the past (waitresses, nannies) only remembered the time of the year when they started and ended those jobs, and when it came to the citizenship application they indicated the approximate dates. Like if it's the end of the summer they would put August 1. My lawyer said the same thing - if there's no record or no recollection of a certain date - provide an approximate time, and then explain it during interview if an officer asks.

To the author of the topic:

Once you submitted the application already - you can only bring corrections to the interview. No need to notify USCIS in advance unless USCIS sends you a note asking to provide an additional information which may also include dates. But it'll be only relevant to the key dates (criminal record or something along those lines).

In your situation, if it's residence or employment, make sure you come to the iterview with the written corrections.

Best,

Edited by olna83

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Thank you. When is the best time to inform the IO about the changes? Before we start going thru the document or once we reach the part that needs to be corrected?

Once you already submitted the application - you can only bring the corrections to the interview. No need to notify USCIS in advance unless USCIS sends you a note asking to provide an additional information which may also include certain dates. But it'll be only relevant to the key dates (like criminal record or something along those lines).

In your situation, if it's residence or employment, make sure you come to the iterview with the written corrections.

Good luck!

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We all know and understand that the dates on an immigration document should be accuarate, and I am not saying the applicants shouldn't worry about it much. However, it is also true that one can forget some dates especially if there was a residence without lease or if an employment was long time ago at a place where they do not issue official offer letters (for record purposes). That was the point of the author's subject. I'm sure had she remember all of her dates she wouldn't have asked this question.

I know instances where my friends who did general labor jobs in the past (waitresses, nannies) only remembered the time of the year when they started and ended those jobs, and when it came to the citizenship application they indicated the approximate dates. Like if it's the end of the summer they would put August 1. My lawyer said the same thing - if there's no record or no recollection of a certain date - provide an approximate time, and then explain it during interview if an officer asks.

To the author of the topic:

Once you submitted the application already - you can only bring corrections to the interview. No need to notify USCIS in advance unless USCIS sends you a note asking to provide an additional information which may also include dates. But it'll be only relevant to the key dates (criminal record or something along those lines).

In your situation, if it's residence or employment, make sure you come to the iterview with the written corrections.

Best,

I thought I said I agreed with you and your post was logical.

I was pointing out that there's no actual rule as to how accurate you have to be.

You said something about plus or minus 20 days or 3 months... those aren't numbers that are found anywhere in the guides or the instructions. I was clarifying that for anyone who may have thought otherwise.

We are in agreement that you just have to do your best. If all you remember is that you took a trip during the summer of 2011 or left a job in late 2012, then that's all you remember. You just have to let the interviewer know that the date is approximate (USCIS has access to all your travel dates anyway).

Edited by JimmyHou

For a review of each step of my N-400 naturalization process, from application to oath ceremony, please click here.

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Update: I had my interview today and passed! Awaiting for oath ceremony appointment. The whole experience at Fairfax USCIS has been amazing. My IO was extremely accommodating and nice. Half of my interview was done conversationally on the way back to the interview room :) the entire process was quick and took less than 20 minutes.

Edited by SJG

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Update: I had my interview today and passed! Awaiting for oath ceremony appointment. The whole experience at Fairfax USCIS has been amazing. My IO was extremely accommodating and nice. Half of my interview was done conversationally on the way back to the interview room :) the entire process was quick and took less than 20 minutes.

YAY! Congratulations. Glad it's over for you. Enjoy your new life as a citizen!

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