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New Citizenship ?

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Hello everybody.

I got question regarding getting a new Citizenship.

Well. I am a U.S Citizen. with a Jordanian Passport. My parents are Jordanians too but they were born in Palestine, So i believe i can get a Palestinian Passport thru them. Plus my Spouse American Italian and for sure i can get an Italian Citizen as well.

Now my question is. for a U.S. citizen like me, can i have another 2 passports with no problems or losing my U.S. Citizenship? I really don't know about this things so that's why i am. because i read somewhere for a U.S. citizen can keep his/her old citizenship that he/she has it before, But after becoming a U.S. Citizen you can not have any Citizen after that or your U.S. Citizenship will be taken away from you? Is this true?

Thank you very much.


بســــم اللـــــه الــــرحمـن الــــرحــــيم

My N-400 timeline, I hope it will help - Local Office (Chula Vista Field Office - San Diego)

10/01/2010: Application was sent.

10/04/2010: Application was received.

10/06/2010: Email received "Application has been received" & Noticed Date.

10/07/2010: "Touch"

10/08/2010: "Touch" & Check was Cashed

10/09/2010: NOA1 Received via mail.

10/22/2010: Status Changed Online "Request for evidence" It was for Biometrics.

10/25/2010: Request for evidence recieved "Biometrics Notice".

11/18/2010: Biometrics date ==> 11:00AM. Biometrics was taken On time.

12/03/2010: "Yellow Letter" Received.

12/06/2010: "Touch" Case Moved to "Testing and Interview".

12/08/2010: Interview Letter received via mail.

01/13/2011: Interview Date. Done, " Thanks To ALLAH, I Passed the Test.

01/18/2011: Oath Letter was Sent.

01/20/2011: Oath Letter Recieved via mail.

01/28/2011: Oath Date. ==> Done, I am a U.S. Citizen

01/31/2011: Applied for a U.S. Passport Book, And, U.S. Passport Card.

02/25/2011: Passport Book's Received.

02/26/2011: Passport Card's Received.

02/28/2011: Certificate Of Naturalization's Returned.

Game Over.

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You can obtain other citizenships, but their are conditions you should be aware of. You must not renounce your USA citizenship. You may be required to declare you have not renounced your USA citizenship. You cannot serve in a foreign military. It is assumed you are not renouncing USA citizenship when your obtain citizenship in another country, unless you specifically renounce it.


K1 from the Philippines
Arrival : 2011-09-08
Married : 2011-10-15
AOS
Date Card Received : 2012-07-13
EAD
Date Card Received : 2012-02-04

Sent ROC : 4-1-2014
Noa1 : 4-2-2014
Bio Complete : 4-18-2014
Approved : 6-24-2014

N-400 sent 2-13-2016
Bio Complete 3-14-2016
Interview
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Multiple citizenship always requires that all countries involved play along. Once you get to 3 or 4 countries, it may get complicated, more than I could explain here in a few words.

Jordan is one of the countries I would have to research, but the United States has no problems with any of its citizens holding another citizenship or obtaining it, because the U.S. does not recognize multiple citizenship. Uncle Sam knows it exists, but doesn't want anything to do with it. The U.S. simply cannot prohibit it, because some countries will either not allow it to renounce their citizenship or make it darn near impossible to do so. That would basically make it impossible for citizens of such countries to naturalize in the U.S. of A. Not the American way.

Italy is totally cool with it, and there are probably over a million Palestinians who hold U.S. citizenship. One of my friends is one of them.

All that said, your post indicates that you are trying to break a record. Know that he who dies with the most citizenships doesn't win anything.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Thank you very much for your Answers. that's exactly what i want to know. because i thought after becoming a U.S. Citizen i will not be able to have another Citizenship of any country in the world. otherwise i will lose my U.S. citizenship. So i was totally wrong.

once again thanks alot.


بســــم اللـــــه الــــرحمـن الــــرحــــيم

My N-400 timeline, I hope it will help - Local Office (Chula Vista Field Office - San Diego)

10/01/2010: Application was sent.

10/04/2010: Application was received.

10/06/2010: Email received "Application has been received" & Noticed Date.

10/07/2010: "Touch"

10/08/2010: "Touch" & Check was Cashed

10/09/2010: NOA1 Received via mail.

10/22/2010: Status Changed Online "Request for evidence" It was for Biometrics.

10/25/2010: Request for evidence recieved "Biometrics Notice".

11/18/2010: Biometrics date ==> 11:00AM. Biometrics was taken On time.

12/03/2010: "Yellow Letter" Received.

12/06/2010: "Touch" Case Moved to "Testing and Interview".

12/08/2010: Interview Letter received via mail.

01/13/2011: Interview Date. Done, " Thanks To ALLAH, I Passed the Test.

01/18/2011: Oath Letter was Sent.

01/20/2011: Oath Letter Recieved via mail.

01/28/2011: Oath Date. ==> Done, I am a U.S. Citizen

01/31/2011: Applied for a U.S. Passport Book, And, U.S. Passport Card.

02/25/2011: Passport Book's Received.

02/26/2011: Passport Card's Received.

02/28/2011: Certificate Of Naturalization's Returned.

Game Over.

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Your parents are Jordanians, you cannot have a Palestinian passport through your parents even if they were born in Palestine.

Just an FYI it is impossible to have a dual Jordanian and Palestinian citizenship's, this is the rules now, a few years ago my cousin got in trouble of having a Palestinian and Jordanian passports, and the Jordanian authorities took his Jordanian citizenship away from him, so he is in Palestine living.

Back to your question of having a multiple Citizenship's after the fact you are a U.S. Citizen, I believe yes you can, but with conditions, read the following information, I hope it's gonna help understand the matter:

Dual citizenship

Based on the U.S. Department of State regulation on dual citizenship (7 FAM 1162), the Supreme Court of the United States has stated that dual citizenship is a "status long recognized in the law" and that "a person may have and exercise rights of nationality in two countries and be subject to the responsibilities of both. The mere fact he asserts the rights of one citizenship does not without more mean that he renounces the other," (Kawakita v. U.S., 343 U.S. 717) (1952). In Schneider v. Rusk 377 U.S. 163 (1964), the US Supreme Court ruled that a naturalized U.S. citizen has the right to return to his native country and to resume his former citizenship, and also to remain a U.S. citizen even if he never returns to the United States.

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) neither defines dual citizenship nor takes a position for it or against it. There has been no prohibition against dual citizenship, but some provisions of the INA and earlier U.S. nationality laws were designed to reduce situations in which dual citizenship exists. Although naturalizing citizens are required to undertake an oath renouncing previous allegiances, the oath has never been enforced to require the actual termination of original citizenship.[25]

Although the U.S. Government does not endorse dual citizenship as a matter of policy, it recognizes the existence of dual citizenship and completely tolerates the maintenance of multiple citizenship by U.S. citizens. In the past, claims of other countries on dual-national U.S. citizens sometimes placed them in situations where their obligations to one country were in conflict with the laws of the other. The 2012 case of US-Thai dual national Joe Gordon is a case in point, who entered Thailand using a US passport but was convicted and imprisoned in May 2011 for Lèse majesté in Thailand.[26] However, as fewer countries require military service and most base other obligations, such as the payment of taxes, on residence and not citizenship, these conflicts have become less frequent.[27] As a result, there has been a dramatic increase in recent years in the number of people who maintain U.S. citizenship in other countries.[citation needed]

The U.S. citizen may lose his dual citizenship by obtaining naturalization in a foreign state, taking an oath or making an affirmation or other formal declaration of allegiance to a foreign state or political subdivision thereof, or serving in the armed forces of a foreign state if this action was performed with the intention of renouncing US citizenship.[28]

One circumstance where dual citizenship may run counter to expectations of government agencies is in matters of security clearance. Any person granted a Yankee White vetting must be absolutely free of foreign influence, and for other security clearances one of the grounds that may result in a rejected application is an actual or potential conflict of national allegiances.

Loss of citizenship

As a historical matter, U.S. citizenship could be forfeited upon the undertaking of various acts, including naturalization in a foreign state or service in foreign armed forces. In addition, before 1967 it was possible to lose the citizenship due to voting in foreign elections. However, the Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional the provisions of Section 349(a) which provided for loss of nationality by voting in a foreign election in the case Afroyim v. Rusk, 387 U.S. 253,[36] . 8 U.S.C. § 1481 specifically outlines how loss of nationality may occur, which predominantly involves willful acts over the age of 18 with the intention of relinquishing United States nationality. U.S. Supreme Court decisions beginning with Afroyim v. Rusk constitutionally limited the government's capacity to terminate citizenship to those cases in which an individual engaged in conduct with an intention of abandoning their citizenship.

Current U.S. State Department rules automatically assume that an individual does not intend to give up citizenship when performing one of the above potentially expatriating acts. If asked, the individual can always answer that they did not intend to give it up; this is sufficient to retain their citizenship.[37] Hence, the U.S. effectively allows citizens to acquire new citizenships while remaining a U.S. citizen, becoming a dual citizen.

Hello everybody.

I got question regarding getting a new Citizenship.

Well. I am a U.S Citizen. with a Jordanian Passport. My parents are Jordanians too but they were born in Palestine, So i believe i can get a Palestinian Passport thru them. Plus my Spouse American Italian and for sure i can get an Italian Citizen as well.

Now my question is. for a U.S. citizen like me, can i have another 2 passports with no problems or losing my U.S. Citizenship? I really don't know about this things so that's why i am. because i read somewhere for a U.S. citizen can keep his/her old citizenship that he/she has it before, But after becoming a U.S. Citizen you can not have any Citizen after that or your U.S. Citizenship will be taken away from you? Is this true?

Thank you very much.

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