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Jeff and Hanh

Might change our mind

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Hello its me again, I am trying to find the requirments for after we get married in the USA. Questions about her working, or can we leave USA and come back here to Vietnam.

I am here in vietnam now and we are thinking about a couple business deals here, we are just researching them now, but next week we are going to go look at a some property to build a business. With the economy in the USA the way it is, I'm thinking of investing here in vietnam, the problem is if I do that it makes more sense to get married here then do the fiancee visa thing. Because I think once we are married in the USA she needs to stay there, and since we would have a new business here we would need to be here not there. So I'm trying to figure out what to do, I'm thinking cancel the fiancee visa, get married here, then in a couple years maybe apply for a spouse visa. Question if we do that and get married here I would like her to come visit my family, would it be easier for her to get a visitation visa to the usa being married to me, and us having a business and stuff here.

Am I correct that after marrage with a fiancee visa she has to stay in USA and how long is that requirement if I am right? What about her working in USA. We origanally planned on starting a business there, but I think getting it started here would be easier, and maybe we can expand to USA in time, but we could reverse that.

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Hello its me again, I am trying to find the requirments for after we get married in the USA. Questions about her working, or can we leave USA and come back here to Vietnam.

I am here in vietnam now and we are thinking about a couple business deals here, we are just researching them now, but next week we are going to go look at a some property to build a business. With the economy in the USA the way it is, I'm thinking of investing here in vietnam, the problem is if I do that it makes more sense to get married here then do the fiancee visa thing. Because I think once we are married in the USA she needs to stay there, and since we would have a new business here we would need to be here not there. So I'm trying to figure out what to do, I'm thinking cancel the fiancee visa, get married here, then in a couple years maybe apply for a spouse visa. Question if we do that and get married here I would like her to come visit my family, would it be easier for her to get a visitation visa to the usa being married to me, and us having a business and stuff here.

Am I correct that after marrage with a fiancee visa she has to stay in USA and how long is that requirement if I am right? What about her working in USA. We origanally planned on starting a business there, but I think getting it started here would be easier, and maybe we can expand to USA in time, but we could reverse that.

First, she is NEVER required to stay in the United States. She could leave anytime she wants to. The consequences are if she's got a green card and stays abroad for more than a year without a reentry permit then she'll lose her green card. If she gets a reentry permit then she can stay abroad no more than two years without losing her green card. If any immigration officer concludes at any time that her primary residence is not in the United States then she can lose her green card. She only needs to stay in the United States and maintain her primary residence here if she wants to keep her green card.

Being married to a US citizen will likely make it even harder for her to get a B2 visitors visa. Once she's admitted to the US, as the spouse of a US citizen she can skip the spousal visa process and just apply for a green card. It's legal to do this, but it's not legal to enter the US specifically with the intention of doing this. It's called preconceived intent, and it amounts to misuse of a non-immigrant visa. The consulate will strongly suspect this is what she plans to do, and it's their job to stop her. If she applies for a visitors visa they'll probably tell her to get a spousal visa instead.

Better plan on your family either coming to Vietnam to meet her, or going to a third country that she could get a visa more easily.


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First, she is NEVER required to stay in the United States. She could leave anytime she wants to. The consequences are if she's got a green card and stays abroad for more than a year without a reentry permit then she'll lose her green card. If she gets a reentry permit then she can stay abroad no more than two years without losing her green card. If any immigration officer concludes at any time that her primary residence is not in the United States then she can lose her green card. She only needs to stay in the United States and maintain her primary residence here if she wants to keep her green card.

Being married to a US citizen will likely make it even harder for her to get a B2 visitors visa. Once she's admitted to the US, as the spouse of a US citizen she can skip the spousal visa process and just apply for a green card. It's legal to do this, but it's not legal to enter the US specifically with the intention of doing this. It's called preconceived intent, and it amounts to misuse of a non-immigrant visa. The consulate will strongly suspect this is what she plans to do, and it's their job to stop her. If she applies for a visitors visa they'll probably tell her to get a spousal visa instead.

Better plan on your family either coming to Vietnam to meet her, or going to a third country that she could get a visa more easily.

Hmm interesting, but thank you for your reply. Well my family isn't going to like that my mom is to old to be making that trip, and I wanted Hanh to at least be able to visit USA. I guess my family will have a member they might never get to meet, alot of friends and family will be disappointed. And you got me wondering about giving up my US citizenship, don't see any reason to pay taxes somewhere we can't go to and living here seems kinda nice really, but hate to do that because in a few years we might want to move to america. Think I might have to get some legal help to answer some questions.

What happens if we get approved for the fiancee visa, then just don't get married and we come back here before the 90 days, will that kill any chances for a spousal visa in a few years.

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. And you got me wondering about giving up my US citizenship, don't see any reason to pay taxes somewhere we can't go to and living here seems kinda nice really, but hate to do that because in a few years we might want to move to america. Think I might have to get some legal help to answer some questions.

If you're going to give up your US citizenship, do so for a better passport than Vietnam. It's hard for Vietnamese passport holders to get visas to most countries. You need lots of evidence. Plus the US government will try to tax you when you give it up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expatriation_tax#United_States

Keep in mind that you should get an exemption on foreign earned income up to $92,000 per year right now provided you stay outside the US for 11 / 12 months per year.

Unless you are filthy rich or can obtain an EU country passport (or maybe Singapore), you're still better off with the US passport.

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Hmm interesting, but thank you for your reply. Well my family isn't going to like that my mom is to old to be making that trip, and I wanted Hanh to at least be able to visit USA. I guess my family will have a member they might never get to meet, alot of friends and family will be disappointed. And you got me wondering about giving up my US citizenship, don't see any reason to pay taxes somewhere we can't go to and living here seems kinda nice really, but hate to do that because in a few years we might want to move to america. Think I might have to get some legal help to answer some questions.

What happens if we get approved for the fiancee visa, then just don't get married and we come back here before the 90 days, will that kill any chances for a spousal visa in a few years.

NEVER EVER give up your US citizenship, trust me you will regret if you give it up.


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NEVER EVER give up your US citizenship, trust me you will regret if you give it up.

I gave my US citizenship in 1975 and moved to Vietnam to serve its communist party. Never regret my decision. I've had a blast of my life!!!!! 35 years later, I've accumulated quite lots of wealth, 3 houses, 2 luxury cars and plenty of foreign bank accounts for my retirement. It would be my wildest dream to even dare dreaming of a small portion of what I current have if I still hang on to my USC.

OP, move to Vietnam NOW!!!!! It's never too late!!!! Don't put down yourself just becoming another normal blue collar worker in the States. Be a leader and a wealth-accumulator in Vietnam! But you need to make the first move on your own to be successful! Good luck!

Edited by TBcolosis

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I gave my US citizenship in 1975 and moved to Vietnam to serve its communist party. Never regret my decision. I've had a blast of my life!!!!! 35 years later, I've accumulated quite lots of wealth, 3 houses, 2 luxury cars and plenty of foreign bank accounts for my retirement. It would be my wildest dream to even dare dreaming of a small portion of what I current have if I still hang on to my USC.

OP, move to Vietnam NOW!!!!! It's never too late!!!! Don't put down yourself just becoming another normal blue collar worker in the States. Be a leader and a wealth-accumulator in Vietnam! But you need to make the first move on your own to be successful! Good luck!

I'm calling BS on this. Vietnam was in chaos in 1975. The Communists didn't exactly trust any Americans at that time, and they certainly weren't looking to hire them.

Also, the US will not accept your renouncement of citizenship unless you'd already become a citizen of another country. Presumably, you would have already become a citizen of Vietnam. Obviously, you wouldn't have become a citizen of the Republic of Vietnam because the Communists would probably have arrested you rather than hiring you. So you became a citizen of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, right? Where did you go to give up your US citizenship? The US Embassy in Saigon was closed for consular operations in March, before the Fall of Saigon. It was closed for good by the end of April. The only way you could have pulled this off is to become a citizen of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam in Ha Noi before the US Embassy closed and then traveled to Saigon to relinquish your US citizenship. That would have been quite a stunt, considering there were no commercial air flights between Ha Noi and Saigon at the time, and traveling by land would have been suicide considering that you were a foreigner, and no matter which side you were on there were literally millions of people along the way who would have been happy to kill you.

This smells like one of D.Q.'s stories. :bonk:


12/15/2009 - K1 Visa Interview - APPROVED!

12/29/2009 - Married in Oakland, CA!

08/18/2010 - AOS Interview - APPROVED!

05/01/2013 - Removal of Conditions - APPROVED!

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I'm calling BS on this.

Agreed. Until at least the late 1980s, Vietnam was "North Korea-lite"... I know, I lived there. An often-told joke of that period was "under the old regime, there was inequality - rich people, poor people. Under the current communist regime, there is no inequality - everyone is starving."

That said, a high school classmate of mine stuck in out in VN; she ended up marrying a very well-connected Communist Party member. Now she is literally swimming in money, much (if not all) of it coming from bribes to her husband. For us in the US to have a lifestyle comparable to hers in VN, we'd need a net income of about $2M/year.

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Agreed. Until at least the late 1980s, Vietnam was "North Korea-lite"... I know, I lived there. An often-told joke of that period was "under the old regime, there was inequality - rich people, poor people. Under the current communist regime, there is no inequality - everyone is starving."

That said, a high school classmate of mine stuck in out in VN; she ended up marrying a very well-connected Communist Party member. Now she is literally swimming in money, much (if not all) of it coming from bribes to her husband. For us in the US to have a lifestyle comparable to hers in VN, we'd need a net income of about $2M/year.

For a VN person to have stayed in VN and obtained what your friend obtained is definitely believable. For a US citizen to have MOVED to VN in 1975 and done the same thing stretches the bounds of credibility. The few Americans who were still in VN in early 1975 were being shot at while trying to get out. This guy wants us to believe he waltzed in, gave up his US citizenship, and joined the Communist party. That might be possible now, but not in 1975.


12/15/2009 - K1 Visa Interview - APPROVED!

12/29/2009 - Married in Oakland, CA!

08/18/2010 - AOS Interview - APPROVED!

05/01/2013 - Removal of Conditions - APPROVED!

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For a VN person to have stayed in VN and obtained what your friend obtained is definitely believable. For a US citizen to have MOVED to VN in 1975 and done the same thing stretches the bounds of credibility. The few Americans who were still in VN in early 1975 were being shot at while trying to get out. This guy wants us to believe he waltzed in, gave up his US citizenship, and joined the Communist party. That might be possible now, but not in 1975.

Jim, if the "secret" on how to do it (my case) is freely available, who would stay behind to become factory workers? Everyone would do the same like me and take milk and honey bath instead of plain hard water right?

I have no desire to prove it to you nor anyone else. Who on earth would give away secrets on becoming rich, especially when it's free?

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Don't feed the DQ troll.


I-864 Affidavit of Support FAQ -->> https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/immigrate/immigrant-process/documents/support/i-864-frequently-asked-questions.html

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CALL THIS NUMBER TO ORDER IRS TAX TRANSCRIPTS >> 800-908-9946

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Do us a favor and go back to your 3 houses and 2 luxury cars (IOW, get lost)... Anybody can be rich and handsome on an internet forum.

Phil,

If you read all of my posts more carefully in this particular thread, I NEVER addressed to you. You seem to be angry. I would care less (if you choose that kinda lifestyle, attacking other ppl on the internet who don't even address to you), but please Phil, go drink a cold glass of water before your high blood pressure starts to jeopardize your health.

We all here at VJ very much care about each other. And we certainly don't tell each other to get lost! Because that would make this forum very childish.

We are grown mature adult coming here seeking help to find love, wouldn't you agree with me?

Don't feed the DQ troll.

Who's DQ? A famous Moderator? A famous sex therapist? A famous communist?

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I'm calling BS on this. Vietnam was in chaos in 1975. The Communists didn't exactly trust any Americans at that time, and they certainly weren't looking to hire them.

Also, the US will not accept your renouncement of citizenship unless you'd already become a citizen of another country. Presumably, you would have already become a citizen of Vietnam. Obviously, you wouldn't have become a citizen of the Republic of Vietnam because the Communists would probably have arrested you rather than hiring you. So you became a citizen of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, right? Where did you go to give up your US citizenship? The US Embassy in Saigon was closed for consular operations in March, before the Fall of Saigon. It was closed for good by the end of April. The only way you could have pulled this off is to become a citizen of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam in Ha Noi before the US Embassy closed and then traveled to Saigon to relinquish your US citizenship. That would have been quite a stunt, considering there were no commercial air flights between Ha Noi and Saigon at the time, and traveling by land would have been suicide considering that you were a foreigner, and no matter which side you were on there were literally millions of people along the way who would have been happy to kill you.

This smells like one of D.Q.'s stories. :bonk:

By the way Jim, membership of the VN Communist party is NOT like one of Sam's club or Costco's, paying a nominal fee and you're in. Ask your wife and you should get a better answer. Millions of Vnese worship the Party and very few get the membership privilege.

Your logic is great in the above quote. But it's not always like so in real life ( at least for the few privileged)

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By the way Jim, membership of the VN Communist party is NOT like one of Sam's club or Costco's, paying a nominal fee and you're in. Ask your wife and you should get a better answer. Millions of Vnese worship the Party and very few get the membership privilege.

Your logic is great in the above quote. But it's not always like so in real life ( at least for the few privileged)

I want to see a picture of you standing next to one of your luxury cars parked in the driveway of one of your homes in Vietnam. Otherwise, you're a phan dong and you need an enema. :whistle:


12/15/2009 - K1 Visa Interview - APPROVED!

12/29/2009 - Married in Oakland, CA!

08/18/2010 - AOS Interview - APPROVED!

05/01/2013 - Removal of Conditions - APPROVED!

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