Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
tarcin

help with names

5 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

So I know people have posted about similar things but I need a bit more detail. I'm engaged to a Turkish man and am working on the K1 paperwork.

We're kind of confused about what to do with his name in the US- it has a 'ğ' in it which is kind of like a silent letter and also a 'Ç' in it which is pronounced 'ch'

So a lot of people seem to just change the 'ğ' to a g, but ummm that completely ruins the pronunciation, and same with changing the 'Ç' to c. We've discussed therefore omitting the 'ğ' and using 'ch' to retain proper pronunciation (think transliteration).

Our biggest concern is that if we omit the 'ğ' and use 'ch' instead of 'Ç'(instead of just using 'g' and 'c') on the forms (of course using the native alphabet space to put his original name) that this will cause some kind of problem with the visa processing. But otherwise he'll end up in the US with a name that is effectively misspelled.

Will this cause a problem with visa processing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I know people have posted about similar things but I need a bit more detail. I'm engaged to a Turkish man and am working on the K1 paperwork.

We're kind of confused about what to do with his name in the US- it has a 'ğ' in it which is kind of like a silent letter and also a 'Ç' in it which is pronounced 'ch'

So a lot of people seem to just change the 'ğ' to a g, but ummm that completely ruins the pronunciation, and same with changing the 'Ç' to c. We've discussed therefore omitting the 'ğ' and using 'ch' to retain proper pronunciation (think transliteration).

Our biggest concern is that if we omit the 'ğ' and use 'ch' instead of 'Ç'(instead of just using 'g' and 'c') on the forms (of course using the native alphabet space to put his original name) that this will cause some kind of problem with the visa processing. But otherwise he'll end up in the US with a name that is effectively misspelled.

Will this cause a problem with visa processing?

I would suggest typing his name as it appears on the birth certificate, passport or any ID that is used for the Visa process. You can place the alternate name spelling in the other names/alias used section of the form. USCIS is pretty competent to figure out the accents on the letter for proper pronunciation. They are looking to make sure all name spelling match on all documents and IDs.


God Does for those who do for themselves..!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we're not worried about the USCIS not pronouncing it properly. we're worried that whatever spelling he puts down will become the legal spelling in the US and we don't want it to be effectively mispelled and not pronounceable

Welcome to the forum.

Interesting question.

For a more focused response, consider reposting your inquiry at the Europe and Eurasian regional forum.

Good luck.


Completed: K1/K2 (271 days) - AOS/EAD/AP (134 days) - ROC (279 days)

> Almost 2 years of our lives involved with the USCIS/DOS "shuffle" & worth every second of it ! <

"Si vis amari, ama" - Seneca

_______________________

:idea: Read more, post less.... Google can be your friend ! :idea:

Prior apologies if I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

Keep your timeline current: http://www.visajourney.com/timeline/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we're not worried about the USCIS not pronouncing it properly. we're worried that whatever spelling he puts down will become the legal spelling in the US and we don't want it to be effectively mispelled and not pronounceable

Don't worry. Russian/Ukrainian uses an entirely different alphabet. Transliterate on the forms as best you can. There is a place for writing the name in the native alphabet. This subject comes up onnearly every visa from the former Soviet Union. The woman wants it spelled "Svetlana" and they spell it "Svitlana" etc, etc. Not an issue really.

The visa will be issued in the name exactly as it is printed on his passport regardless of what you do on the forms. If that is not your preferred spelling you can change it when you do the AOS or the citizenship.


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×