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mitra

Did i jeopardize my citizenship interview by filing a demandfor visa to return to my husband abroad?

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Hi everyone,

It has been 7 months that i have been in the states and haven't seen my husband for 3 months. So today i filed a demand to have a visa (return visa) to go & see him in europe& maybe stay for a while with him(6,7 months+). It's not a tourist visa, it's a visa that they give when your one-year european resident visa has expired and you could not come back. I should mention that since asking schengen visa was a hassle for me, last year i asked for a resident visa to go & live with my husband.(so i already asked for a one-year resident visa from a european country while i had my green card). This return visa will be pasted to my passport in 15 days & my citizenship interview date is in 30 days.

--Do you think the officer can bother me when he sees a visa on my passport?

--Do you think it's comprehensible for USCIS officers if i mention in my interview that maybe after my oath ceremony i live abroad for a while?

--As a citizenship applicant, do the USCIS officers approve someone who wants to live in the U.S.?

--I'm not sure that my husband can immediately move out from his country so i look to join him after my oath ceremony but i don't know if mentioning that can have a negative affect on the day of my interview or not?

Thanks for all your thoughts and advices

Mitra

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--Do you think the officer can bother me when he sees a visa on my passport?

Yes. But how do you know it's not a woman?

--Do you think it's comprehensible for USCIS officers if i mention in my interview that maybe after my oath ceremony i live abroad for a while?

Yes. I do think I.O.s can easily match the comprehension level of an ape, even if it's one like Ceasar, as shown in the movie "The Rise of The Planet of the Apes."

--As a citizenship applicant, do the USCIS officers approve someone who wants to live in the U.S.?

Yes, all the time.

--I'm not sure that my husband can immediately move out from his country so i look to join him after my oath ceremony but i don't know if mentioning that can have a negative affect on the day of my interview or not?

Maybe. Maybe not. I don't think the I.O. has any interest in where you want to live.

Edited by Just Bob

There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Correct me if I am wrong - but requesting a resident status somewhere else sort of conflicts with your resident status in the US. I think Just Bob answered all your questions but you are missing a lot of information.

It seems you applying based on 5 years? but one can only assume?

Also - when will you be eligible to apply for naturalization?

If you obtain a resident visa in Europe, then even if you maintain your status in the US, I don't think they will overlook the fact that you have been out of the country for 6+ months. They will probably ask you to wait until you satisfy the continuous residency and physical presence requirements.

you need to be careful when claiming residence in one country and then applying for residence in another...

These are only my thoughts but these are sort of things I would be concerned about if I were in your shoes.


N-400 Naturalization Timeline

06/28/11 .. Mailed N-400 package via Priority mail with delivery confirmation

06/30/11 .. Package Delivered to Dallas Lockbox

07/06/11 .. Received e-mail notification of application acceptance

07/06/11 .. Check cashed

07/08/11 .. Received NOA letter

07/29/11 .. Received text/e-mail for biometrics notice

08/03/11 .. Received Biometrics letter - scheduled for 8/24/11

08/04/11 .. Walk-in finger prints done.

08/08/11 .. Received text/e-mail: Placed in line for interview scheduling

09/12/11 .. Received Yellow letter dated 9/7/11

09/13/11 .. Received text/e-mail: Interview scheduled

09/16/11 .. Received interview letter

10/19/11 .. Interview - PASSED

10/20/11 .. Received text/email: Oath scheduled

10/22/11 .. Received OATH letter

11/09/11 .. Oath ceremony

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You are from France, yet you need a Schengen visa or residence card to live in EU? This does not make any sense! :no:

You need to read up on meeting residency requirements for naturalization. Info you have provided is simply not enough to tell if you meet those requirements.


CR-1 Timeline

March'07 NOA1 date, case transferred to CSC

June'07 NOA2 per USCIS website!

Waiver I-751 timeline

July'09 Check cashed.

Jan'10 10 year GC received.

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You are from France, yet you need a Schengen visa or residence card to live in EU? This does not make any sense! :no:

You need to read up on meeting residency requirements for naturalization. Info you have provided is simply not enough to tell if you meet those requirements.

Seems that way, and with a US passport can easily go to France without a visa and stay up to 90 days. At which time:

"For the spouse of a French citizen, the "livret de famille" or a copy of the French marriage license, or the official French transcript of the marriage license when the marriage took place out of France. The French citizen must prove his/her nationality. Note that an American citizen spouse of a French citizen wishing to live in France does not need a visa. He or she must apply directly for a residency card once in France (with the "livret de famille"). "

From:

http://gofrance.about.com/cs/relocating/a/visas_3.htm

Assume you are going to apply for and receive US citizenship first. And hopefully you will meet the residency requirements.

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Thanks for your replies,

to clarify my situation, i'm a LPR (5 year).I just applied for citizenship. i'm not french, my husband is french that's why i need a visa to go & see him.Since i wasn't sure that i can get my citzenship right away, i though of applying for a visa for France. Also i should mention that last year i asked for a one-year residency card in France because it was easier in that way to travel & see my husband when he needs me than asking for a schengen visa.

i didn't break the continuous residency though.

hopefully i become citizen & don't need to ask for a visa anymore.

but i don't know if the officer can understand that my sole reason to ask for a one year residency card in france was to be able to travel there easily to be with my husband. a lot of immigrants go back to their countries of birth to see their spouses.in my case i had to ask for a visa every time i wanted to visit my husband.

Thanks,

Mitra

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Thanks for your replies,

to clarify my situation, i'm a LPR (5 year).I just applied for citizenship. i'm not french, my husband is french that's why i need a visa to go & see him.Since i wasn't sure that i can get my citzenship right away, i though of applying for a visa for France. Also i should mention that last year i asked for a one-year residency card in France because it was easier in that way to travel & see my husband when he needs me than asking for a schengen visa.

i didn't break the continuous residency though.

hopefully i become citizen & don't need to ask for a visa anymore.

but i don't know if the officer can understand that my sole reason to ask for a one year residency card in france was to be able to travel there easily to be with my husband. a lot of immigrants go back to their countries of birth to see their spouses.in my case i had to ask for a visa every time i wanted to visit my husband.

Thanks,

Mitra

With a green card, to travel, you need some kind of a passport, won't be a US passport, but one of the other 200+ different countries passports. And each country treats the other 200+ countries passport differently. I assume your existing passport is not from France. Care to share what country your passport is from?

What about your husband coming here? Or, as my wife puts it, more complications.

What I found crazy in this business about meeting someone from a foreign country is buying plane tickets. On the same exact airline and the same seat. When we first met, was a lot cheaper for us to buy plane tickets in her home country than here. Now buying plane tickets in her home country is about twice the price.

All of this passport stuff is arbitrary, ran by governments that can change their rules from day to day, more like whatever bug the dictator of that country has up his butt. Just saying, whatever was your circumstance was in the past can be different today and change again tomorrow. Our last president had a bug up his butt about traveling to Canada with a history of open borders for over two hundred years.

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If you did not break continuous residence and kept your home in the US, then you should be OK.

It all comes to where most of your ties were and are at the moment.

You probably have Carte de Sejour Temp "vie prive and familiale", which allows for work (not good).

Hopefully you also worked in the US some time during those 5 years and filed US taxes for all 5 years.

Hopefully you kept US bank accounts, US driver's license, have close family in the US and some property. IO might ask you for that info during the interview to determine your eligibility.

Thanks for your replies,

to clarify my situation, i'm a LPR (5 year).I just applied for citizenship. i'm not french, my husband is french that's why i need a visa to go & see him.Since i wasn't sure that i can get my citzenship right away, i though of applying for a visa for France. Also i should mention that last year i asked for a one-year residency card in France because it was easier in that way to travel & see my husband when he needs me than asking for a schengen visa.

i didn't break the continuous residency though.

hopefully i become citizen & don't need to ask for a visa anymore.

but i don't know if the officer can understand that my sole reason to ask for a one year residency card in france was to be able to travel there easily to be with my husband. a lot of immigrants go back to their countries of birth to see their spouses.in my case i had to ask for a visa every time i wanted to visit my husband.

Thanks,

Mitra


CR-1 Timeline

March'07 NOA1 date, case transferred to CSC

June'07 NOA2 per USCIS website!

Waiver I-751 timeline

July'09 Check cashed.

Jan'10 10 year GC received.

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