Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Danny&Adri

Citizenship for under 18 years old

14 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

I was born in the US. My wife and step son got their Green Card in June 2007. My wife is exploring the US Citizenship process. My step son is 14.

1. Is there a way for my wife and step son to both get their citizenship processed at the same time (now, not waiting for him to turn 18)?

2. If so, is there a significant risk that his might be rejected and hers approved?

3. If not, is there a way for perhaps my wife to get her citizenship and then for her to sponsor the citizenship for my step son (her biological son) before he is 18?

Edited by Danny&Adri

.

~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~

~=~................. .................................................~=~

~=~.... pushpin.gif All is going very well !.......................... ~=~

~=~...................................................................~=~

~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~

3dflags_col0001-0003a.gif3dflags_usa0001-0003a.gif3dflags_usasc01-0003a.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your step son will automatically become a citizen once your wife does. You will need to file N600 (Certificate of US Citizenship) for your son for proof of citizenship.


بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم
I-751 (waiver) Timeline:
1/22/2010 Sent I-751 Waiver to VSC
1/26/2010 NOA
2/19/2010 Biometrics
4/30/2010 Card Production ordered (الحمد لله )
5/05/2010 Received Approval Notice
5/22/2010 Card Received
N:400
12/07/2012: Sent N400

12/13/2012: Check Cashed
12/12/2012: NOA
12/26/2012: Biometrics
02/08/2013: Placed in line for interview
02/11/2013: Scheduled for interview
03/18/2013: Interview

05/03/2013: Call from USCIS for oath ceremony!(الحمد لله)

05/08/2013: Oath Ceremony & Passport application

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your step son will automatically become a citizen once your wife does. You will need to file N600 (Certificate of US Citizenship) for your son for proof of citizenship.

Yeah, they kind of get you one way or the other, stepdaughter just had to turn 18 before her mom could apply for US citizenship, so she had to wait for the five year, take the civics test, plus another 1,350 miles of driving, biometrics, interview, than the oath ceremony. Under 18 is the N-600, but still 600 bucks, but can save a lot of driving.

Since my stepdaughter turned 18, we had no choice but to use the five year on her, so I really didn't dig into the details. Another person with the N-600 said he has to go to an oath ceremony, I was under the impression you just sent in the paperwork, wait, six or so months and the certificate is mailed. Others say to forget about the certificate and just go for a US Passport, but people that did that reported the DOS wants all kinds of proof. For one thing, your wife may have your married name and her child the biological parents name, have to send in proof with that paper trail to prove to the DOS you are indeed that parent of that child. Previous marriage certificate, divorce papers, new marriage certificate, birth certificate of the child. But then another woman that did that, the DOS also wanted a notarized letter from the biological parent, giving that child permission to get a US passport.

I know if we had to go through that, my stepdaughter would never get that letter from her dad, he wouldn't even give permission for his daughter to renew her foreign passport, but yet complained to me that I wouldn't let her travel so she could visit him. What an idiot! I would think in dealing with the USCIS, you would bypass that since they already have all the paperwork that child has permission to come here from that parent. But I am not sure about this, could never apply for the N-600 due to her age.

Can say one thing for sure, those children are not automatically US citizens via there immigrant parent gaining US citizenship, they don't give you any proof of that. You have to pay dearly to get that proof with a lot more chasing around.

Even if her dad would sign that permission, no way could we visit her home country, could get in, but couldn't get back out again without his permission, again, they would not accept the fact that my wife had full custody and a court order giving her permission to bring her daughter here. They insist on a new current permission with dates and flight numbers. Even though he abandoned his daughter six years before I met my wife that didn't carry any weight in their courts. But the ace we had, he would have to pay ten years of child support, we forgave that for his permission.

Thank God, that is all history now, while hitting that 18 years of age with the USCIS was a disaster for us with a two more year wait for my stepdaughter, she was free to get her own passport.. Has a new US passport now, but really no good in her returning to her home country. Still has to maintain that countries passport because her place of birth shows she was born in that country. But she can travel everywhere else with her US passport.

Still a no win situation, thanks to our laws.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, your step son will become a US citizen automatically.

No, you don't need to file an N-600 (sorry, Nick) and waste$600 and time on it.

I have advised people in the same situation several times now on how to get a US passport and thus prime proof of US citizenship without a Certificate of Citizenship and they all were successful. It does work!


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, your step son will become a US citizen automatically.

No, you don't need to file an N-600 (sorry, Nick) and waste$600 and time on it.

I have advised people in the same situation several times now on how to get a US passport and thus prime proof of US citizenship without a Certificate of Citizenship and they all were successful. It does work!

Just Bob is correct... see:

http://travel.state.gov/visa/immigrants/types/types_1312.html#7


Meta =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just Bob is correct... see:

http://travel.state....pes_1312.html#7

Reread my post, didn't see anything to disagree with, more of a pro and con type post, and admitted I didn't have direct experience this this.

But can either of you positivity state the OP will not have problems in getting permission from the biological parent for the DOS requirement? This MAY not be a requirement with the USCIS, but may also not be a problem for this couple to get that permission.

What about an expired US passport? This is just a question, is it still valid for proof of citizenship.

Can state either the certificate or the passport works with the DMV in my state and with the SS. Can also state that this couple does have a choice in either the N-600 or the US passport for proof of citizenship. Passport does double for traveling abroad, the certificate is worthless for that, still need a passport.

This is a matter of choice, if my stepdaughter was under 18, she would have both her certificate and US passport, that is my choice. But as it was, she was over 18 she had to get that certificate because she needed a US passport, when she got that, I got her passport as well, but that was my choice. Not pushing it either way. But since this child is under 18 and citizenship is applied for before this child turns 18 of the immigrant parent, they do have a choice which way to go. But each has advantages and disadvantages, if you want just advantages, have to apply for both. If the child plans never on traveling, over the long term, the N-600 would be cheaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nick,

the N-600 has two purposes: a primary one and a secondary one.

The primary one is to get the very first US passport. After the passport has been issued, it serves as proof of citizenship. I strongly advise any immigrant to get a passport book and a passport card to make sure they have a backup document in case one gets lost.

The secondary one is to save as backup in case a Tsunami, wildfire, or earthquake swallows the entire house and everything in it.

Any passport serves as type A proof of citizenship. Interestingly, for I-9 purposes, meaning when applying for a job, the Certificate of Citizenship and the Certificate of Naturalization are not any longer accepted! This means, a passport is as good as it gets for proof of citizenship.

The N-600 costs $600, the passport card $30 plus fees. A heck of a deal, me thinks!


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Tsunami, wildfire, or earthquake swallows the entire house and everything in it." can be more of a problem than just your certificate. Claim you should have photos of everything you own to file an insurance claim. I haven't done that in years, so equally guilty. They just don't give you the money you are insured for, have to prove every loss. Would think that 400 bucks for a new certificate would also be covered.

One thing we use to have in our state, but quit that about 20 years ago would be to bring in important documents to your register of deeds, would charge a buck for a certified copy that was suppose to be just as good as the original in case yours is lost for some reason. With all the documents for my wife and stepdaughter that are extremely difficult to get from a foreign country, couldn't find any place in this country that offers that service. But then you have an additional concern that your courthouse would also be consumed by that tsunami.

Was told all of my military records were burnt up in St. Louis so wasn't eligible for my VA benefits. For some strange reason about seven years ago, I did get a letter from Washington DC that I was reinstated and now eligible for full VA benefits. First thing I ask for was a refund on all the tuition payments I had to make out of pocket. No deal was told, just from now on. Just saying that fire or tsunami is possible and especially devastating if it happens to you.

USCIS tells you to make copies of your certificate in case yours is lost, don't they keep records of your certificate, you need that copy. Not exactly sure how SS is now involved, they are suppose to keep records of your citizenship status. We were told just last month not to change your SS status at your SS office for at least two weeks until their database was updated. If they have that database, why do we have to drive in to notify them what they should already know?

Here we are just talking about a minor where under this definition a child under the age of 18, a different definition for a minor is used when petitioning, that is under the age of 21, can't even be consistent in these ages.

Practically most of us on this board are over 18 and need that certificate to get a US passport, this is just isolated to children under the age of 18 whose parent is eligible to apply for US citizenship. Still unclear if that under age of 18 is when the parent can apply or after the oath ceremony. And we know when a decision cannot be made for some reason, months can go by before that certificate is received. So what happens if that kid ages to over 18? Is he/she still automatically a US citizen via his/her parent?

I would think not, because when that application goes to the DOS, you are dealing with an entirely different agency and have to follow their rules about ages and at that date. This is a very common problem where we have 1,525 agencies to deal with. One small example, my stepdaughter got screwed out of that Bush 600 buck tax credit, wrote to my congressman on that, responded by saying, you are correct, but didn't do anything about it. In one law too young, in another, too old kind of thing.

Only very young minor children have that option of either the passport or the N-600. In regards to proving your citizenship, that is very state related, for most of the important stuff in our state like voting or getting a drivers' license, all you have to do is to check the I am a US citizen box. Sure make it easy for illegals to vote and get a drivers' license. But we don't make the laws, just have to follow them.

Probably why with immigration bot this strange idea our country is ran by idiots. Really the only place my wife and stepdaughter had to show their green cards was at our field office. Don't they know they have green cards, they issued them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A great idea is to get an authorized copy of the Certificate of Naturalization directly from USCIS. It's FREE of charge and can be obtained by making an appointment and then showing up with the original. The copy is like the original, sans photo. If that's kept at a different location, it can be used in case of an emergency to obtain a new passport, as long as the applicant has one form of accepted photo ID, such as a driver's license.

Cool, huh?


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A great idea is to get an authorized copy of the Certificate of Naturalization directly from USCIS. It's FREE of charge and can be obtained by making an appointment and then showing up with the original. The copy is like the original, sans photo. If that's kept at a different location, it can be used in case of an emergency to obtain a new passport, as long as the applicant has one form of accepted photo ID, such as a driver's license.

Cool, huh?

Where did you read that Bob? I wasn't aware of that. Is anyone else here aware of this?

So as long as you have your original, you can get another free? But 400 bucks if something happens to it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where did you read that Bob? I wasn't aware of that. Is anyone else here aware of this?

So as long as you have your original, you can get another free? But 400 bucks if something happens to it?

The "other" one is a "Certified True Copy," but since it's a copy directly from USCIS, it is valid proof of US citizenship.

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=85e5e6b0eb13d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCRD&vgnextchannel=54519c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1RCRD


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "other" one is a "Certified True Copy," but since it's a copy directly from USCIS, it is valid proof of US citizenship.

http://www.uscis.gov...00045f3d6a1RCRD

Interesting!

"If you have the original document to be certified, you must make an appointment with your local USCIS office by using the InfoPass Appointment Scheduler on our website. When you go to your appointment, be sure to bring your original naturalization certificate and a copy of it. Also bring another form of photo identification, such as a drivers license or passport. A USCIS officer will review the documents and may certify the copy, if the officer can confirm your identity and status as a naturalized citizen.

Wife's certificate has her photo stuck on with double sided tape with two USCIS ink stamps half on her photo, other half on the certificate. Willing to bet that is all they do with YOUR copy. Certainly would be a stress reliever if you could send that certified copy off for your passport. Could have given you one at the oath ceremony, but for us, would be another 450 mile trip. I know you got your passport the same day, for us, a 630 mile round trip. But that is our fault, not the DOS or the USCIS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the very good input.

Finding this web site back in 2004 was a God send. The whole visa journey community has been fabulous with all the questions I have had. Much more helpful than my calls to the USCIS, my visits to my local office and even my letters to my Senator. Thank you all so very much.


.

~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~

~=~................. .................................................~=~

~=~.... pushpin.gif All is going very well !.......................... ~=~

~=~...................................................................~=~

~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~

3dflags_col0001-0003a.gif3dflags_usa0001-0003a.gif3dflags_usasc01-0003a.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the very good input.

Finding this web site back in 2004 was a God send. The whole visa journey community has been fabulous with all the questions I have had. Much more helpful than my calls to the USCIS, my visits to my local office and even my letters to my Senator. Thank you all so very much.

So what's your choice, the N-600, the US passport, or both?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×