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jbiel590

Filing taxes while living in US and working in NL

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Netherlands
Timeline

Hi all,

as we all know, tax season is here and I am getting more and more worries and confused... My situation might be a little unique: I immigrated from the Netherlands to the US & got married last year (2010), so since april 2010 I live in the US. However, I have been a PhD student in the Netherlands and I convinced my employer that I could carry out most of my work from the US. So: I am employed in the Netherlands, get my pay check in euros to my Dutch bank account and pay all the taxes there so far. Now that my husband (who works in the US) and I have a household together and have to file taxes together, I have no idea how to go about this! I know I have to file in both countries, but do not want to pay double taxes!

Does anyone have experience with a like situation? Or any other advice where to look for help? Anything is welcome! Thanks a bunch!

Chris

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Vietnam
Timeline

Hi all,

as we all know, tax season is here and I am getting more and more worries and confused... My situation might be a little unique: I immigrated from the Netherlands to the US & got married last year (2010), so since april 2010 I live in the US. However, I have been a PhD student in the Netherlands and I convinced my employer that I could carry out most of my work from the US. So: I am employed in the Netherlands, get my pay check in euros to my Dutch bank account and pay all the taxes there so far. Now that my husband (who works in the US) and I have a household together and have to file taxes together, I have no idea how to go about this! I know I have to file in both countries, but do not want to pay double taxes!

Does anyone have experience with a like situation? Or any other advice where to look for help? Anything is welcome! Thanks a bunch!

Chris

You have to declare the foreign earnings when you file your tax return in the US. However, you are generally allowed to deduct the mandatory taxes you had to pay in the Netherlands. This will offset any taxes owed to the US government, and may even eliminate them entirely. This is complicated enough that you might want to consult with a tax accountant.


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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Russia
Timeline

Hi all,

as we all know, tax season is here and I am getting more and more worries and confused... My situation might be a little unique: I immigrated from the Netherlands to the US & got married last year (2010), so since april 2010 I live in the US. However, I have been a PhD student in the Netherlands and I convinced my employer that I could carry out most of my work from the US. So: I am employed in the Netherlands, get my pay check in euros to my Dutch bank account and pay all the taxes there so far. Now that my husband (who works in the US) and I have a household together and have to file taxes together, I have no idea how to go about this! I know I have to file in both countries, but do not want to pay double taxes!

Does anyone have experience with a like situation? Or any other advice where to look for help? Anything is welcome! Thanks a bunch!

Chris

You have to declare the foreign earnings when you file your tax return in the US. However, you are generally allowed to deduct the mandatory taxes you had to pay in the Netherlands. This will offset any taxes owed to the US government, and may even eliminate them entirely. This is complicated enough that you might want to consult with a tax accountant.

Jim is correct. To avoid double taxation on your wages you need to claim a foreign tax credit for the taxes that were paid to the Dutch government. I suggest you read IRS Publication 514 - Foreign Tax Credit for Individuals before deciding whether you want to try and prepare your tax return by yourself or hire a tax professional. Here is the link to the publication:

Publication 514 - Foreign Tax Credit for Individuals

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