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ceekay70

When shall I apply for citizenship?

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Filed: Timeline

I had my N400 application all filled up and then hubby (US citizen) got laid off. We decided not to send in the application since we don't know if we may end up moving. After several rounds of interviews, it looks like a Canadian company is very keen on hiring hubby. He was thinking that if he got hired, he'll ask for a start date of late Aug. Since we live in NY, looking at the average citizenship application timeline, it may take 6 to 9 months. So my question is, should I submit my application and have hubby just move to Canada first while our kids and I wait for my approval? Or can I apply when I am in Canada? Or not apply at all and hope that we will end up back in the US? My GC expires in 2014 and if I've been out of the country for a few years, will I have trouble renewing my GC or even granting me citizenship? Would appreciate your input. Thanks.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

I had my N400 application all filled up and then hubby (US citizen) got laid off. We decided not to send in the application since we don't know if we may end up moving. After several rounds of interviews, it looks like a Canadian company is very keen on hiring hubby. He was thinking that if he got hired, he'll ask for a start date of late Aug. Since we live in NY, looking at the average citizenship application timeline, it may take 6 to 9 months. So my question is, should I submit my application and have hubby just move to Canada first while our kids and I wait for my approval? Or can I apply when I am in Canada? Or not apply at all and hope that we will end up back in the US? My GC expires in 2014 and if I've been out of the country for a few years, will I have trouble renewing my GC or even granting me citizenship? Would appreciate your input. Thanks.

So much for the global economy, my company exported many jobs to Canada because they could save 5,600 bucks per employee on health insurance cost. But that didn't last long, got a much better deal from China. So should you apply for citizenship in Canada, or just simply China? But how long will China last? They are getting rich where there are many other third world countries willing to work for nothing. USA had a very strong trade deficit ever since they opened the doors to Japan, then Korea, then Taiwan, and now, even Viet Nam. We really never been nice to our allies from WW II, like European countries charging very high tariffs for anything they import to us. But have been extremely generous to the countries that caused us a lot of grief. Exactly who is our government representing? Crosses my mind frequently when looking for work.

So why even apply for USC when you can't even earn a living here? Good question, but at least we have a government now that is talking about this now age old problem, but still spending a lot of our money fighting for the freedom of other countries that don't want us there. Also a question about family, do you have family here that you want to leave to earn an income? My family sure was spread across the world except for my kids working in the medical field, still lots of job in that area.

In the hopes that this country will revert to the way we were, the most powerful manufacturing country in the world, just go ahead and apply. Once you got US citizenship, will last forever, and maybe things will get better here, hopefully, if we don't go broke first.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Argentina
Timeline

I had my N400 application all filled up and then hubby (US citizen) got laid off. We decided not to send in the application since we don't know if we may end up moving. After several rounds of interviews, it looks like a Canadian company is very keen on hiring hubby. He was thinking that if he got hired, he'll ask for a start date of late Aug. Since we live in NY, looking at the average citizenship application timeline, it may take 6 to 9 months. So my question is, should I submit my application and have hubby just move to Canada first while our kids and I wait for my approval? Or can I apply when I am in Canada? Or not apply at all and hope that we will end up back in the US? My GC expires in 2014 and if I've been out of the country for a few years, will I have trouble renewing my GC or even granting me citizenship? Would appreciate your input. Thanks.

I don't understand the part that you say you've out of the ocuntry? did you loose your LPR? if your out of the country for a year you loose your residency. can you explain?

you cannot apply in Canada you have to live in the US, proving continous presence.

and it's not taking that long normally.

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Filed: Timeline

I don't understand the part that you say you've out of the ocuntry? did you loose your LPR? if your out of the country for a year you loose your residency. can you explain?

you cannot apply in Canada you have to live in the US, proving continous presence.

and it's not taking that long normally.

What I meant was that if I were to leave the US and stay in Canada due to husband's job (I assume we will be in Canada for a few years at least), then would I have trouble renewing my GC and/or applying for citizenship later when (if) we come back to the US to live for good.

So I take it from your response is that I will lose residency if I live outside the US for more than a year and I cannot apply for citizenship while living in Canada.

So I guess I should apply for citizenship before I move. I am hoping that it will not take that long but just looking at what the NY folks in this forum are saying, it may take that long.

Thanks.

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Filed: Other Timeline

You apply for citizenship NOW and travel back for the interview. Simple as that.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Filed: Other Timeline

You use the address of a trustworthy friend or family member in the US. You file the new address with USCIS first, the follow up with your N-400 application at the same address.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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