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Europeanboy

How do they exactly do that backgroud check?

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I am probably asking something that nobody knows but I am really curious in what way they check your background except criminal history which is easy to figure out. Do they check the couple's social security numbers in each government agency to verify their information? For the last two years my wife and I have changed 4-5 places to live of which We have reported three only in AR-11 and I-865 to USCIS. We've submitted two leases only in our I-751 because simply We really haven't had contracts for the rest of the places We've lived.

When we moved to our new place We did it through an agency and we had to go through a background check. When we were approved I went to the office to finish signing some paperwork and I saw our background check the office person there let me look at it even though I wasn't supposed to and I saw everything there all our moves everything which kind a made me thinking. We have only two leases the first and the last one in addition to the rest of evidence which is a lot. what do they know about us? I just wanna hear your opinions...

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I am probably asking something that nobody knows but I am really curious in what way they check your background except criminal history which is easy to figure out. Do they check the couple's social security numbers in each government agency to verify their information? For the last two years my wife and I have changed 4-5 places to live of which We have reported three only in AR-11 and I-865 to USCIS. We've submitted two leases only in our I-751 because simply We really haven't had contracts for the rest of the places We've lived.

When we moved to our new place We did it through an agency and we had to go through a background check. When we were approved I went to the office to finish signing some paperwork and I saw our background check the office person there let me look at it even though I wasn't supposed to and I saw everything there all our moves everything which kind a made me thinking. We have only two leases the first and the last one in addition to the rest of evidence which is a lot. what do they know about us? I just wanna hear your opinions...

I am pretty sure they just look at criminal records.

They don't even care if you have bad or good credit, as long as you don't owe money to the IRS and pay all your taxes :0-)


Removing Conditions - I-751

Joint I-751 Sent- 04/02/10

Received at CSC - 04/05/10

Check Cashed - 04/07/10

NOA & extension received - 04/09/10 (dated 04/05/10)

Biometrics done - 05/18/10

Card Production Ordered - 06/24/10

Approval letter received - 06/30/10

New green card received - 07/06/10

Citizenship - N-400

N400 Sent - 04/01/11

check cashed - 04/07/11

Biometrics done-05/17/11

Interview letter-05/28/11

Interview date - 06/30/11

Oath ceremony-07/07/11

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I am pretty sure they just look at criminal records.

They don't even care if you have bad or good credit, as long as you don't owe money to the IRS and pay all your taxes :0-)

They do a National Agency Check. They look to see if any "hits" come up. By the way, more and more background checks include a credit history, since everything is keyed to your SSN anyways. I would be surprised if that is not included in the background check, though the items that concern the DHS might be limited to just those of a criminal nature, or fraud.

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I am surprised. The background check is threefold:

• The Interagency Border Inspection System (IBIS) Name Check— IBIS is a multiagency effort with a central system that combines information from multiple agencies, databases and system interfaces to compile data relating to national security risks, public safety issues and other law enforcement concerns. USCIS can quickly check information from these multiple government agencies to determine if the information in the system affects the adjudication of the case. Results of an IBIS check are usually available immediately. In some cases, information found during an IBIS check will require further investigation. The IBIS check is not deemed completed until all eligibility issues arising from the initial system response are resolved.

• FBI Fingerprint Check—FBI fingerprint checks are conducted for many applications. The FBI fingerprint check provides information relating to criminal background within the United States. Generally, the FBI forwards responses to USCIS within 24-48 hours. If there is a record match, the FBI forwards an electronic copy of the criminal history (RAP sheet) to USCIS. At that point, a USCIS adjudicator reviews the information to determine what effect it may have on eligibility for the benefit. Although the vast majority of inquiries yield no record or match, about 10 percent do uncover criminal history (including immigration violations). In cases involving arrests or charges without disposition, USCIS requires the applicant to provide court certified evidence of the disposition. Customers with prior arrests should provide complete information and certified disposition records at the time of filing to avoid adjudication delays or denial resulting from misrepresentation about criminal history. Even expunged or vacated convictions must be reported for immigration purposes.

• FBI Name Checks—FBI name checks are also required for many applications. The FBI name check is totally different from the FBI fingerprint check. The records maintained in the FBI name check process consist of administrative, applicant, criminal, personnel and other files compiled by law enforcement. Initial responses to this check generally take about two weeks. In about 80 percent of the cases, no match is found. Of the remaining 20 percent, most are resolved within six months. Less than one percent of cases subject to an FBI name check remain pending longer than six months. Some of these cases involve complex, highly sensitive information and cannot be resolved quickly. Even after FBI has provided an initial response to USCIS concerning a match, the name check is not complete until full information is obtained and eligibility issues arising from it are resolved.

http://www.uscis.gov/files/pressrelease/security_checks_42506.pdf

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Great info. but why do you have to do biometric so many times, does your fingerprint change? once you've done once they should be able to do your background with info they already have in the system (all they have to do is hit recheck button). but that's how the system works.


#1 investment is YOURSELF!!!

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How about your spouse? How do they check all your history with your spouse? If you are still married if you have kids and all that good stuff?

I suppose they go by the documents that you supply them. If they have any questions, they will send an RFE, or request an interview.

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Good question. The website just says the USCIS does a background check of the applicant/petitioner at this stage (generic). Since it is a "joint" application, you have to wonder. They never take the "petitioner's" fingerprints, so I guess they could only do the first and third checks on the USC. Since FBI name checks were taking 4 to 6 months to complete at one time, and as fast as the CSC is completing the applications, it appears the checks are superficial, if at all, or they have a must faster system in California for some reason. :star:

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Great info. but why do you have to do biometric so many times, does your fingerprint change?

the second bio metrics are done to validate that the same person who AOS'd is ROC.


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I am reading the thread for the guy that had his N-400 denied because he got divorced before his joint I-751 was approved and he didn't notify USCIS for that.

Got married to US Citizen in April 02.

Got temp green crad on Sep 02.

Filed I-751 jointly in July 04.

Filed for no fault divorce in Sep 04.

Got divorced in Nov 04.

I-751 approved in July 05. So,

No children. No property settlement or alimony agreement. I have no clue about the whereabouts of my ex wife. Its been over 5 years.

I was under the impression that everything is fine. I got my 10 year green card. We were married for 2.5 years. It was a legit marriage. Had all proof in I-751 application. We lived together for 3 years (6 months prior to marriage moved in together).

Now, after 6 years, I filed N400. It got denied. They said, that I was given green card in an error. Because we were divorced before I-751 was approved. They sent me a form to appeal for N400. My question is, if I appeal, most probably it will be denied too. Should I file I-751 waiver now separately? I am confused. My attorney says, file I-751 waiver and appeal for N400 also at the same time to buy some time, while I-751 is in process. Is that the right thing to do? I don't seem to have too many choices. Need some guidance. If I were to file I-751 waiver, what kind of documents should I include to support the marriage?

To some extend that shows how USCIS does the background check. 9 months after he divorced they approved his JOINT I-751. I think that was enough time for them to find out if he was still married because that's the basis he filed on! The easiest thing to find out and they didn't bother to do so! The only thing they check I think is criminal history, DUI,...

Edited by VSCfiler

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This is actually quite interesting as I have been thinking about it with regards to my husband. As we live in DC you can imagine we have many friends that live what we call a "secure lifestyle" aka security clearances. Because my husband is a foreign national many of them due to their level must list him as a foreign contact. He is now on several lists because of this. He also had an extensive background check due to his employment and has to go through this routinely for rechecks. We make jokes about how checked out he is but I am wondering if this will hurt or help him. I am hoping help him considering. Guess we will see. *Crosses fingers*


-Dawn(Vinny-Irish/Dawn-American)

08/14/13: CITIZEN! We are done!

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Good question. The website just says the USCIS does a background check of the applicant/petitioner at this stage (generic). Since it is a "joint" application, you have to wonder. They never take the "petitioner's" fingerprints, so I guess they could only do the first and third checks on the USC. Since FBI name checks were taking 4 to 6 months to complete at one time, and as fast as the CSC is completing the applications, it appears the checks are superficial, if at all, or they have a must faster system in California for some reason. :star:

My thought was while it is a joint application, it is still the alien's application. The only dog the USC has in the proverbial hunt is that they want their spouse to receive their 10 year GC. Proof of support is not asked for, nor is anything else from the USC for that matter. But would that preclude them from running some kind of background check on the USC? Possibly not.

Interesting to ponder though!

(BTW love your avatar :D


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My thought was while it is a joint application, it is still the alien's application. The only dog the USC has in the proverbial hunt is that they want their spouse to receive their 10 year GC. Proof of support is not asked for, nor is anything else from the USC for that matter. But would that preclude them from running some kind of background check on the USC? Possibly not.

Interesting to ponder though!

(BTW love your avatar :D

I'm a Pink Floyd fan from way, way back when! :P

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