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Government Benefits?

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Filed: Country: Russia
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I have a question regarding what the consulate will consider government benefits for the purpose of determining if my fiancee will become a public charge or not. My fiancee was living in Pripyat Ukraine during the time when there was a nuclear factory or something that had an accident and had to evacuate the city. Because the government was slow to act, people who lived there now receive benefits from the government such as having half their rent paid etc. I read on the guides that if the beneficiary receives government benefits then they might deny them a visa because they are likely to become a public charge. What are yall's opinions with regard to this particular situation? Will it be a potential problem for us?

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Vietnam
Timeline

I have a question regarding what the consulate will consider government benefits for the purpose of determining if my fiancee will become a public charge or not. My fiancee was living in Pripyat Ukraine during the time when there was a nuclear factory or something that had an accident and had to evacuate the city. Because the government was slow to act, people who lived there now receive benefits from the government such as having half their rent paid etc. I read on the guides that if the beneficiary receives government benefits then they might deny them a visa because they are likely to become a public charge. What are yall's opinions with regard to this particular situation? Will it be a potential problem for us?

I've never heard of a consulate considering whether the visa applicant was receiving any government benefits in their own country when making the public charge determination for a K visa. I don't know of any basis under US immigration law that would allow them to consider this. What they are required to consider is the ability of the sponsor to support the beneficiary in order to ensure that they won't need or apply for means tested benefits in the US. Many people sponsor beneficiaries who are flat broke, unemployed, and without any marketable job skills. As long as the sponsor meets the financial requirements, the beneficiary will not be denied on the basis of the public charge determination.


12/15/2009 - K1 Visa Interview - APPROVED!

12/29/2009 - Married in Oakland, CA!

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Filed: Citizen (pnd) Country: Thailand
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This is very strange. I think you have misread somewhere about considering the fiance(e)' financial situation in their home country. The USC petitioner must fill out the I-134 Affidavit of Support to show how they can provide for the Alien beneficiary.


Naturalization N-400

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Filed: Country: Russia
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Oh yes I did indeed misread! I was reading the following:

"An actual case has been documented wherein a fiance visa was denied because the petitioning fiance was on

government benefits and would not be working, even though the US fiance had two co-sponsors."

http://www.visajourney.com/content/support

This applies to the petitioner and not the beneficiary though. I feel better!

Thanks

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: United Kingdom
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IF the US fiance has been on welfare or other

government benefits for a lifetime or has no plans to work actively, the consulate can still deny the visa based on

the likelihood that the foreign fiance will become a public charge.

I think it's better to read it in its entirety. I'm sure that there are some petitioners out there that have filed and received their visas but had government supplements. They were/are working and had not spent a lifetime on benefits.


I married my British Husband strictly for financial purposes. My heart wrote a check and I cashed it. (L)

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