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N-400 Questions

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I am currently filling out the N-400 based on being married to a US citizen and using the 3 year option. I am retired and have been for 10years, I have lived at the same address for the last the last 3 years.

My Questions

Do I have to list my residence outside the US prior to obtaining my Green Card or only for the last 3 years?

Both my children are US citizens. Do I just put that in the children info section as they ask for A numbers?

My previous spouse is deceased. I am currently married to my present one for 44 years. What do I list as my previous spouse's immigration status? Deceased which I already indicated in a previous question or her citizenship. She was not US.

I have listed retired in the appropriate section and gave wrote my last occupation. Is this correct?

I am sure that there are simple answers to these questions, but reading some postings it appears that dealing with the USCIS is never a simple or straightforward matter.

Thanks for your help

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Filed: Other Timeline

I am currently filling out the N-400 based on being married to a US citizen and using the 3 year option. I am retired and have been for 10years, I have lived at the same address for the last the last 3 years.

My Questions

Do I have to list my residence outside the US prior to obtaining my Green Card or only for the last 3 years?

Both my children are US citizens. Do I just put that in the children info section as they ask for A numbers?

My previous spouse is deceased. I am currently married to my present one for 44 years. What do I list as my previous spouse's immigration status? Deceased which I already indicated in a previous question or her citizenship. She was not US.

I have listed retired in the appropriate section and gave wrote my last occupation. Is this correct?

I am sure that there are simple answers to these questions, but reading some postings it appears that dealing with the USCIS is never a simple or straightforward matter.

Thanks for your help

I'm sorry, but your post makes no sense to me. You providing information that collides like atoms in the universe.

I have no clue how long you have a Green Card. Is it 3 years, 5 years, or over 44 years?

If you are a Green Card holder for 5 years or more, you do NOT file based on marriage to a USC. The marriage to a USC option allows a Green Card holder to apply for citizenship after only 3 years, instead of 5 years. Once you reached the magic 5-years, the marriage means nothing anymore.

If you are married to your second wife for 44 years already . . . how long have you had your Green Card?

Your US citizen children have no bearing on any immigration or naturalization case whatsoever. They are US citizens, and US citizens do not have A numbers. A numbers are for aliens, foreign nationals.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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I am currently filling out the N-400 based on being married to a US citizen and using the 3 year option. I am retired and have been for 10years, I have lived at the same address for the last the last 3 years.

My Questions

Do I have to list my residence outside the US prior to obtaining my Green Card or only for the last 3 years?

Both my children are US citizens. Do I just put that in the children info section as they ask for A numbers?

My previous spouse is deceased. I am currently married to my present one for 44 years. What do I list as my previous spouse's immigration status? Deceased which I already indicated in a previous question or her citizenship. She was not US.

I have listed retired in the appropriate section and gave wrote my last occupation. Is this correct?

I am sure that there are simple answers to these questions, but reading some postings it appears that dealing with the USCIS is never a simple or straightforward matter.

Thanks for your help

Hi,

it would be a good idea if you provide when you became a LPR.

However, reading between the lines, it sounds like you have been a resident for almost 3 years now, but you have been married for 44 years. If so, then you do not need to list any residences prior to becoming a LPR.

As for your former spouse, in Part F:

F.2, you need to check other, and write down his nationality/citizenship.

F.4, you write the date your previous spouse passed away and

F.5, you check "Spouse Died".

As for your children, the instructions are clear that you need to list ALL children from you and your spouse either togther or previous marriages. If you read the instructions, they tell you what to exactly write in each of the boxes.

As for the last occupation, retired should be fine.

Please take some time to read the instructions http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/n-400instr.pdf

Also, take some time to read the Guide to Naturalization M-476 http://www.uscis.gov/files/article/M-476.pdf

Helpful documents.

As for your occupation, retired sounds right.

Hope this helps.


N-400 Naturalization Timeline

06/28/11 .. Mailed N-400 package via Priority mail with delivery confirmation

06/30/11 .. Package Delivered to Dallas Lockbox

07/06/11 .. Received e-mail notification of application acceptance

07/06/11 .. Check cashed

07/08/11 .. Received NOA letter

07/29/11 .. Received text/e-mail for biometrics notice

08/03/11 .. Received Biometrics letter - scheduled for 8/24/11

08/04/11 .. Walk-in finger prints done.

08/08/11 .. Received text/e-mail: Placed in line for interview scheduling

09/12/11 .. Received Yellow letter dated 9/7/11

09/13/11 .. Received text/e-mail: Interview scheduled

09/16/11 .. Received interview letter

10/19/11 .. Interview - PASSED

10/20/11 .. Received text/email: Oath scheduled

10/22/11 .. Received OATH letter

11/09/11 .. Oath ceremony

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline

I am currently filling out the N-400 based on being married to a US citizen and using the 3 year option. I am retired and have been for 10years, I have lived at the same address for the last the last 3 years.

My Questions

Do I have to list my residence outside the US prior to obtaining my Green Card or only for the last 3 years?

If you have only been a PR in the US for three years and are applying based on that status, then only include the addresses you have lived in since becoming a permanent resident.

Both my children are US citizens. Do I just put that in the children info section as they ask for A numbers?

Either write "no A#, born in US" or "(e.g.)Jane A#XXXX now US citizen and (e.g.) John A#XXXXX now US citizen"

My previous spouse is deceased. I am currently married to my present one for 44 years. What do I list as my previous spouse's immigration status? Deceased which I already indicated in a previous question or her citizenship. She was not US.

"Not applicable - never in US, now deceased" would work

I have listed retired in the appropriate section and gave wrote my last occupation. Is this correct?

Yes, that should be fine.

I am sure that there are simple answers to these questions, but reading some postings it appears that dealing with the USCIS is never a simple or straightforward matter.

It always seems easier when someone else is answering the questions but when it is your turn, suddenly it doesn't seem as straight-forward. I know - it happened to me too :yes: .

Thanks for your help

Good luck :)


“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

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Another Member of the VJ Fluffy Kitty Posse!

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

Each to his own, wasn't about to change the form, if the USCIS asked for the last five years, that is exactly how we filled it out and was also the advice of my attorney.

Maybe we don't get around that much, for the employment and address history, wife only had two jobs, one in Venezuela and one here, same for addresses, hers in Venezuela, and her present address here, but those two went back over twenty years. Filling out the days out of the country was no problem either, said since you became a LPR, no three or five years on that. Only thing that was questioned was the days out of the country in the last five years, was something like 435 days. Her IO said she should have put down the days out of the country since she became a LPR, but wife said, the question did not ask that, it asked the days out of the country for the last five years. That we computed from the date on our application.

Her IO could not question that, because that is precisely what the question asked, and you are suppose to answer each question honestly and to the best of your ability. If they want to know the number of days you have been out of the country since receiving your LPR card, that is precisely what they should ask.

If the USCIS is not happy with that question, they should change it, with most government forms, can get into trouble by changing their forms. It's their form, not ours.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

Thanks for the help. You all are terrific and I do appreciate it. I know that sometimes the answers to the questions are straight-forward but I just wanted to make sure that I did not make any silly mistakes.

I thought that question about did you commit any crimes you were never caught for was stupid, who would admit that? But later read, if you did get caught later with that crime, you lied on your N-400 and therefore can be deported. Makes sense in that respect.

But doesn't make sense when they ask for fives years when they should be asking for the period of time since you became a LPR. I did find a pre-Bush form on the net where the questions were less nebulous. But Bush appointed Emilio, a Cuban refugee that helped him win the election as head of the USCIS, and Emilio didn't speak very good English. Perhaps the reason for the changes. But that's history, form has yet to be corrected. Still do not feel that is our job to change it. Would be more tempted to put a "?" mark in that box and explain it on a separate sheet of paper.

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