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dakotatp

Translator's Certification

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I'll be soon submitting an application for a US Visa for my wife.



Below is copied and pasted from the Instructions regarding translation of foreign language documents.



Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator’s certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.



I submitted Thai language documents for translation to English via email. They were promptly translated and hard-copies mailed and soft-copies emailed to me. I paid by bank transfer. No problem. The translated docs are stamped, "Certified complete and correct translation" and signed by the translator.



I subsequently (repeatedly) asked, via email, for the "translator's certification", but I get no response.



(1) What exactly is the "translator's certification?" Is this similar to a business license?



(2) Is the United States Citizen Immigrant Services really strict about seeing a copy of the translator's certification?



(3) Why are they ignoring my email? I used what appears to be a very large translation company in BKK.


I printed out the homepage of the translation company's website. Can this suffice as proof of their validity?




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(1) I can not say for sure, because my documents have not even been sent, let alone reviewed and approved, but, I view it as something like a notary public, or Professional Engineers stamp. The stamp IS the certification with the signature.

Like I said, my docs have not been reviewed yet, but I can not see anything else they could want. I hope.

(3) They are probably ignoring you because THEY don't know what you are talking about. If it is like I say above, then as far as they are concerned, they already sent what you are asking for with the translation, any further communication is asking for trouble!

That last bit there is my opinion, Thai's seem to clam up rather than try to clarify a situation.

I will be curious if someone tells you different though... I will have to get on my horse and quickly find the cert. for my docs!!!

Edited by ibhitchin

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I'll be soon submitting an application for a US Visa for my wife.

Below is copied and pasted from the Instructions regarding translation of foreign language documents.

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator’s certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

I submitted Thai language documents for translation to English via email. They were promptly translated and hard-copies mailed and soft-copies emailed to me. I paid by bank transfer. No problem. The translated docs are stamped, "Certified complete and correct translation" and signed by the translator.

I subsequently (repeatedly) asked, via email, for the "translator's certification", but I get no response.

(1) What exactly is the "translator's certification?" Is this similar to a business license?

(2) Is the United States Citizen Immigrant Services really strict about seeing a copy of the translator's certification?

(3) Why are they ignoring my email? I used what appears to be a very large translation company in BKK.

I printed out the homepage of the translation company's website. Can this suffice as proof of their validity?

You have what you need. You don't need anything further from the translator. The stamp is the translator's certification.


You can click on the 'X' to the right to ignore this signature.

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I'll be soon submitting an application for a US Visa for my wife.

Below is copied and pasted from the Instructions regarding translation of foreign language documents.

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator’s certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

I submitted Thai language documents for translation to English via email. They were promptly translated and hard-copies mailed and soft-copies emailed to me. I paid by bank transfer. No problem. The translated docs are stamped, "Certified complete and correct translation" and signed by the translator.

I subsequently (repeatedly) asked, via email, for the "translator's certification", but I get no response.

(1) What exactly is the "translator's certification?" Is this similar to a business license?

(2) Is the United States Citizen Immigrant Services really strict about seeing a copy of the translator's certification?

(3) Why are they ignoring my email? I used what appears to be a very large translation company in BKK.

I printed out the homepage of the translation company's website. Can this suffice as proof of their validity?

This idea of certification is wildly misunderstood. The certification is simply a statement by the person that did the translation indicating they are competent in both languages.

Karee is correct.

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(1) I can not say for sure, because my documents have not even been sent, let alone reviewed and approved, but, I view it as something like a notary public, or Professional Engineers stamp. The stamp IS the certification with the signature.

Like I said, my docs have not been reviewed yet, but I can not see anything else they could want. I hope.

(3) They are probably ignoring you because THEY don't know what you are talking about. If it is like I say above, then as far as they are concerned, they already sent what you are asking for with the translation, any further communication is asking for trouble!

That last bit there is my opinion, Thai's seem to clam up rather than try to clarify a situation.

I will be curious if someone tells you different though... I will have to get on my horse and quickly find the cert. for my docs!!!

You are wrong in many ways here. A notary isn't required simply because they don't do translations and never have anything to do with the content of a document. They verify signatures only.

An engineer would never be used and would not stamp anything outside of the discipline they are trained in.

There is no stamp required to be a certified translator. In Thailand you can pay a translator and they will use a stamp because they think it looks good but they know nothing of the actual requirements of the U S embassy.

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You are wrong in many ways here. A notary isn't required simply because they don't do translations and never have anything to do with the content of a document. They verify signatures only.

An engineer would never be used and would not stamp anything outside of the discipline they are trained in.

There is no stamp required to be a certified translator. In Thailand you can pay a translator and they will use a stamp because they think it looks good but they know nothing of the actual requirements of the U S embassy.

I did not mean to imply, and I certainly did not say, that you could take a document in need of translation to a notary, nor to a PE.

What I did say, was that in the same way that a notarized document will get a Notary stamp, and the same way that a reviewed and approved Engineering document will get the reviewing PE's stamp, a translated document will get a translators stamp.

Since receiving your reply, you have prompted me to check what we have for our documents, and that stamp bit is not entirely correct, it does not come from the translator. As it turns out you can have the translation done by anyone, but the translation stamp is affixed and signed by a single (gov.?) authority, after reviewing and approving the translation. That is what we have on our documents that are sitting in an overnight envelope in the US, waiting for a IV bill receipt to be added to them.

Ning, you allude to additional requirements of the US Embassy, would you mind expanding on that. If indeed there are further requirements, what precisely are they?

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I did not mean to imply, and I certainly did not say, that you could take a document in need of translation to a notary, nor to a PE.

What I did say, was that in the same way that a notarized document will get a Notary stamp, and the same way that a reviewed and approved Engineering document will get the reviewing PE's stamp, a translated document will get a translators stamp.

Since receiving your reply, you have prompted me to check what we have for our documents, and that stamp bit is not entirely correct, it does not come from the translator. As it turns out you can have the translation done by anyone, but the translation stamp is affixed and signed by a single (gov.?) authority, after reviewing and approving the translation. That is what we have on our documents that are sitting in an overnight envelope in the US, waiting for a IV bill receipt to be added to them.

Ning, you allude to additional requirements of the US Embassy, would you mind expanding on that. If indeed there are further requirements, what precisely are they?

Ok but what ever terms you want to use or analogy you like,to say some stamp is required is simply wrong. A translated document will have a stamp if someone puts one on the doc but that has nothing to do with the required procedure.

You say I alluded to some hidden requirements? No. This is exactly my statement :

There is no stamp required to be a certified translator. In Thailand you can pay a translator and they will use a stamp because they think it looks good but they know nothing of the actual requirements of the U S embassy. There is nothing wrong with doing this if people just want to pay more money per page because they like to see some colored stamp with a persons name they cant read on it.

The embassy has accepted many times including in my own case a simple statement made by the person that does the translation that indicates they are fluent in both languages. This is signed and dated whereupon it becomes the " certified " translation. The certification is no more than that. No stamp nor anything further. So an acceptable certified translated document does not have to have a stamp on it.

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Ok but what ever terms you want to use or analogy you like,to say some stamp is required is simply wrong. A translated document will have a stamp if someone puts one on the doc but that has nothing to do with the required procedure.

You say I alluded to some hidden requirements? No. This is exactly my statement :

There is no stamp required to be a certified translator. In Thailand you can pay a translator and they will use a stamp because they think it looks good but they know nothing of the actual requirements of the U S embassy. There is nothing wrong with doing this if people just want to pay more money per page because they like to see some colored stamp with a persons name they cant read on it.

The embassy has accepted many times including in my own case a simple statement made by the person that does the translation that indicates they are fluent in both languages. This is signed and dated whereupon it becomes the " certified " translation. The certification is no more than that. No stamp nor anything further. So an acceptable certified translated document does not have to have a stamp on it.

I think Karee and I said this in previous posts but Karee did it three sentences.

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I got the answer. The US Embassy officially recognizes 6 different translation companies, but acknowledges that there are many more. Attached is a list of those 6 companies.

A photocopy of the translation company's certification issued to them by the Thai government must be obtained from any translation company that is not on the US Embassy's list. In other words, a copy of their occupational license must be obtained. They should be able to scan this and email it to any client who makes a request.

translators_photographers.pdf

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I got the answer. The US Embassy officially recognizes 6 different translation companies, but acknowledges that there are many more. Attached is a list of those 6 companies.

A photocopy of the translation company's certification issued to them by the Thai government must be obtained from any translation company that is not on the US Embassy's list. In other words, a copy of their occupational license must be obtained. They should be able to scan this and email it to any client who makes a request.

Hmm...nice work in finding that document.

Here is what USCIS says about translation.

http://www.uscis.gov/forms/file-my-application-online-e-filing/submitting-supporting-documentation

  • Translations. Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

10-04-2013 We met online
11-21-2013 We met in person in Shanghai for 2 weeks

12-13-2013 I-129F packet sent via express

12-19-2013 USCIS NOA #1 (text and email) received

12-24-2013 USCIS assigns Alien Registration Number
12-31-2013 USCIS NOA #1 hard copy received
06-02-2014 USCIS web site shows NOA #2 approval
06-06-2014 USCIS web site shows case sent to NVC

06-xx-2014 Fiancee acquired birth, marriage, and police certificates from local police station (wrong)

06-16-2014 NVC creates case with GUZ### number

06-19-2014 NVC sends case sent to Guangzhou, China
06-24-2014 Received packet 3 express mail from embassy
06-25-2014 Completed DS-160 and paid K1 visa fee

06-26-2014 Mailed packet 3 response back to Embassy

06-26-2014 Requested police certificate from Russian embassy

07-08-2014 Received packet 4 email from Embassy

07-17-2014 Picked up Russian police certificate

07-25-2014 Fiancee medical exam (received MMR & Varicella, but they missed required TD shot)

07-31-2014 Picked up medical exam reports

08-01-2014 Request (correct) birth, marriage, and police certificates from Notarial Service (GongZhengChu)

08-06-2014 Picked up birth, marriage, and police certificates from Notarial Service

08-14-2014 Passed Interview Guangzhou embassy

09-01-2014 Received passport, visa, & sealed envelope

09-13-2014 POE

09-17-2014 Went to CBP office to get (US entry) I-94 updated correctly

09-18-2014 Applied for Social Security Card
09-19-2014 Applied for Marriage License (via online)
09-25-2014 Received Social Security Card
09-30-2014 Picked up Marriage License
10-09-2014 Marriage by Justice of Peace
10-09-2014 Got Certified Marriage Certificate Copies
10-17-2014 Received a letter from SS office that they need the marriage license
10-09-2014 Applied to change the social security card name
10-24-2014 Went back to SS office to provide the marriage certificate documents again!!!
12-09-2014 Submitted AOS, EAD, and AP
12-16-2014 Received 16 emails and 16 text NOA messages
01-05-2015 Received Biometrics appointment letter for (01-12-2015)
01-12-2015 Had Biometrics (fingerprint & picture) - Required Marriage Certificate!!!
02-17-2015 EAD and AP is approved
02-23-2015 Received AP is approval letter
02-25-2015 Received EAD/AP combo card (expires 02/16/2016)
02-27-2015 Applied for SS card name change (they took her SS card)
02-27-2015 Driver's learner permit test was denied since the SS card was given to SS office for name change
03-17-2015 Received SS card with married name
03-17-2015 Started to change all her accounts to married name
03-23-2015 Received potential interview waiver letter
03-27-2015 DMV rejects learner's permit due to "legal status=pending" and vision test failure
04-05-2015 Vision test for learner's permit
04-06-2015 DPS sent us letter that DHS cleared my wife's status to acquire driver's license.
04-10-2015 Passed Driver Learner's Permit
04-22-2015 Received Driver Learner's Permit ID card (expires 02/16/2016)
08-27-2015 Green Card approved
08-31-2015 Received Green Card "Welcome Notice Was Mailed" letter
09-05-2015 Received Green card
10-26-2015 Passed Driver's License Road Test (on 3rd attempt)
11-03-2015 Received Driver's License (expires 02/16/2022)
11-06-2015 Applied to remove conditional work remark on SS card
11-23-2015 Received updated Social Security Card.
- - - - - - - - - - Pending Future Processing - - - - - - - - - -
05-27-2017 File 10 Year Green Card
08-27-2017 2 Year Green Card Expires
05-27-2018 File USC

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A photocopy of the translation company's certification issued to them by the Thai government must be obtained from any translation company that is not on the US Embassy's list. In other words, a copy of their occupational license must be obtained. They should be able to scan this and email it to any client who makes a request.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/752997-usa-visa-form-i-130-certification-of-translator/?p=8270631

I'm assuming doontp from TVF and dakotap here on VJ are the same person. I'm wondering where that requirement came from? That is definitely new. I've had monks here in Dallas at the Thai temple translate documents for me that were submitted to USCIS. I can assure you they're not on any US Embassy approved list.

Something is not making sense here unless there's a new policy.

Edited by Karee

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http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/752997-usa-visa-form-i-130-certification-of-translator/?p=8270631

I'm assuming doontp from TVF and dakotap here on VJ are the same person. I'm wondering where that requirement came from? That is definitely new. I've had monks here in Dallas at the Thai temple translate documents for me that were submitted to USCIS. I can assure you they're not on any US Embassy approved list.

Something is not making sense here unless there's a new policy.

Your assumption is correct. doontp and dakotatp is the same person.

I called USCIS at Tel.: 02-205-5352. USCIS said a business license issued to them by the government allows them to provide translation services.

Again....the below is taken for the Form I-130 Instructions.

(1) Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct,

and

(2) Any foreign language document must be accompanied by the translator’s certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

What certification or proof does the monk have that indicates he is competent to translate the foreign language into English? A Bachelors Degree in English? Perhaps I'm going overboard with my understanding of the I-130 instructions? Perhaps I'm being a little too #######? Perhaps the person I spoke with over the phone (who I will add did not sound like an American) was wrong?

I'm not trying to ruffle anyone's feathers. I'm not here to debate what's right or wrong. Bottom line I don't want any problems or holdups on my wife's visa application. My wife's visa app will be a documentation-gathering of perfection. My wife will not be denied. I'm looking for any loose end, any I that hasn't been dotted, any T that hasn't been crossed.

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Your assumption is correct. doontp and dakotatp is the same person.

I called USCIS at Tel.: 02-205-5352. USCIS said a business license issued to them by the government allows them to provide translation services.

Again....the below is taken for the Form I-130 Instructions.

(1) Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct,

and

(2) Any foreign language document must be accompanied by the translator’s certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

What certification or proof does the monk have that indicates he is competent to translate the foreign language into English? A Bachelors Degree in English? Perhaps I'm going overboard with my understanding of the I-130 instructions? Perhaps I'm being a little too #######? Perhaps the person I spoke with over the phone (who I will add did not sound like an American) was wrong?

I'm not trying to ruffle anyone's feathers. I'm not here to debate what's right or wrong. Bottom line I don't want any problems or holdups on my wife's visa application. My wife's visa app will be a documentation-gathering of perfection. My wife will not be denied. I'm looking for any loose end, any I that hasn't been dotted, any T that hasn't been crossed.

USCIS Document Translation Policy

Per the USCIS, documents not in English must be translated. The policy states as follows: "All documents that are in a language other than English must be submitted with a translation. The person translating the document must certify that the translation is complete and accurate and that he/she is competent to translate from the foreign language into English."

All translations must include a statement similar to the following:

Certification by Translator:

I typed name , certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and

languages, and that the above/attached document is an accurate translation of the

document attached entitled .

Signature

Date Typed Name

Address

Source: http://www.visajourney.com/content/translations

That's it. That's all I used. Not sure if the policy has changed since then, but I don't think it has.


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Source: http://www.visajourney.com/content/translations

That's it. That's all I used. Not sure if the policy has changed since then, but I don't think it has.

The US CIS just called me with additional information.

A company doing the translation must simply provide their contact info, i.e. letterhead, attached to the translation.

An individual doing the translation must complete a certification form which is provided by the US CIS and attach it to the translation. The lady said she will email this form to me. I will post it when I get it. She said she's working alone today and will email it to me as soon as she can.

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The US CIS just called me with additional information.

A company doing the translation must simply provide their contact info, i.e. letterhead, attached to the translation.

An individual doing the translation must complete a certification form which is provided by the US CIS and attach it to the translation. The lady said she will email this form to me. I will post it when I get it. She said she's working alone today and will email it to me as soon as she can.

Karee has given the example form we used and the same one used by hundreds or thousands of others. However if you feel what you have learned is somehow more correct then use that format and you should have no problem. This can be done either way.

I note the format Karee posted is directly from USCIS.

Edited by Ning

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