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notyuriy

Question about Certificate of Citizenship Number

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Hi, I'm brand new here, preparing to file a K1 visa to bring my fiancee to US. I am a citizen through my parents, both of whom have Certificates of Citizenship. On form I-134, 1B states: "If a U.S. Citizen through parent(s) or marriage, give Certificate of Citizenship number".

Since both of my parents have these certificates (and I do not), do I put both of them on the form or just one, and which?

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You were either born in the US or were naturalized. If you were born here, you dont have to fill in the rest of Question 1.

If you were naturalized, you have to have a naturalization certificate.

Edited by Shri & Vai

K-1 Timeline:

Oct 06, 2008 - I-129F sent to USCIS

Jul 08, 2009 - Interview at Montreal Consulate

Jul 10, 2009 - US Entry. POE: Buffalo, NY

Jul 15, 2009 - Marriage

AOS Timeline:

July 29, 2009 - AOS, AP, and EAD sent to USCIS

July 30, 2009 - USCIS receives Documents.

Aug 05, 2009 - Received NOA Dated July 31.

Aug 10, 2009 - Biometrics letter. Appointment date: Sep 2nd.

Aug 13, 2009 - AOS transferred to CSC.

Sep 02, 2009 - Biometrics done at Elizabeth, NJ location.

Sep 16, 2009 - Received emails of EAD(Card production Ordered) and AP(Approval notice sent).

Sep 21, 2009 - Received 2nd email of EAD(Card production Ordered)

Sep 22, 2009 - Received AP.

Sep 26, 2009 - Received EAD Card

Oct 19, 2009 - AOS transferred back to NJ.

Nov 05, 2009 - RFE for I-693

Dec 02, 2009 - USCIS receives I-693 vaccination supplement.

Jan 06, 2010 - RFE for Entire I-693 needed since CBP/USCIS loses our documents.

Feb 04, 2010 - I-693 received by USCIS.

Feb 17, 2010 - Green Card in mail!!!

Conditions Timeline:

Nov 17, 2011 - Sent I-751 application to Vermont office.

Nov 22, 2011 - I-751 Receipt Notice/Extension letter sent by USCIS.

Jan 04, 2012 - Biometrics done at Elizabeth, NJ location.

Aug 31, 2012 - GC approved.

Sep 11, 2012 - GC mailed. USCIS says we should receive within 7 days

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No I came here with parents before I was 18 so I became a citizen when my parents got their citizenship, but I didn't get my own certificate of citizenship (naturalization). I see what you mean after re-reading the form. I was confusing it with I-129F #10 because that step clearly has boxes for Parents' # and your own #.

So will it be acceptable to fill out I-134 #1 D - Alien #? I still have that from my old green card even though I have a passport now. I read on this forum that the A# stays with you for life.

Edited by notyuriy

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You were either born in the US or were naturalized. If you were born here, you dont have to fill in the rest of Question 1.

If you were naturalized, you have to have a naturalization certificate.

One can also derive citizenship through one's parents (even if living abroad). However, a certain form (N-600K, I believe) should have been filled out by the parents on behalf of the child. The child would then be assigned a Certificate of Citizenship and corresponding number (much like--but actually distinct from--naturalization).

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This might be useful: http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.eb1d4c2a3e5b9ac89243c6a7543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=d4c3a3ac86aa3210VgnVCM100000b92ca60aRCRD&vgnextchannel=d4c3a3ac86aa3210VgnVCM100000b92ca60aRCRD

Take note of the second-to-last paragraph. You may need to apply for a Certificate of Citizenship to complete the Affidavit.

Edited by alexd

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One can also derive citizenship through one's parents (even if living abroad). However, a certain form (N-600K, I believe) should have been filled out by the parents on behalf of the child. The child would then be assigned a Certificate of Citizenship and corresponding number (much like--but actually distinct from--naturalization).

You are not required to get the N-600K. Plenty of posts (and people I've asked in the past unrelated to K1) do say that you can be a citizen through parents without having naturalization or certificate of citizenship. The I-129F itself implies this because it asks if you are a citizen through parents (if yes, then you are a citizen), and then follows up with "Have you obtained a certificate in your name?".

alexd, you got me scared for a second :-) but if you re-read that paragraph:

A person who satisfies the requirements of section 320 of the INA before turning 18 automatically obtains citizenship without having to file an application. However, in order to obtain a certificate of citizenship from USCIS, an individual must file Form N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship. To obtain a U.S. Passport, visit the Department of State's Apply for a U.S. Passport webpage.

All it says is that if I want to obtain a certificate of citizenship, I need to file N-600. It says right before that, that I would automatically obtain citizenship without having to file an application.

So back to the heart of the question: Is filling out question 1 in I-134 with an A# (option D) sufficient?

Or maybe I need to do option C and attach an explanation with parents' citizenship #s?

Edited by notyuriy

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So will it be acceptable to fill out I-134 #1 D - Alien #? I still have that from my old green card even though I have a passport now. I read on this forum that the A# stays with you for life.

No, you will not fill out #1(d) as you are not a Legal Permanent Resident (you are a citizen). The subsections of question #1 are mutually exclusive (e.g. you will only fill out one and ONLY one). To simplify, #1(b) is the applicable subsection for your particular situation.

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No, you will not fill out #1(d) as you are not a Legal Permanent Resident (you are a citizen). The subsections of question #1 are mutually exclusive (e.g. you will only fill out one and ONLY one). To simplify, #1(b) is the applicable subsection for your particular situation.

So there is no way around it? I have to pay another $600 and wait for however long just to get a #? :-(

I'm curious if any other US Citizens have done this process without having a certificate. It's just puzzling to me that I-129F would not require you to have one, but I-134 would.

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alexd, you got me scared for a second :-) but if you re-read that paragraph:

All it says is that if I want to obtain a certificate of citizenship, I need to file N-600. It says right before that, that I would automatically obtain citizenship without having to file an application.

So back to the heart of the question: Is filling out question 1 in I-134 with an A# (option D) sufficient?

Or maybe I need to do option C and attach an explanation with parents' citizenship #s?

Again, Question 1 is specific to the sponsor and no one else.

#1(a) is n/a because you were not naturalized (you derived citizenship through your parents--#1(b))

#1© is n/a because again, you derived citizenship through your parents--#1(b)

#1(d) is n/a because you are NOT a LPR, you are a CITIZEN

And yes, you DID automatically obtain citizenship without having to fill out an N-600, BUT to "be official" about your citizenship and to technically execute the I-134 sufficiently, you would need your OWN Certificate of Citizenship number.

In all reality, providing your parents' CoC numbers would probably suffice, it just depends on how strict the consulate will be.

What I'm trying to get across is that this is the way it SHOULD (technically) be done.

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In my own (personal) opinion though (JUST an opinion), I don't think that your own Certificate number would absolutely be necessary. I'm thinking that there may be some way around it, which we'll have to wait for someone else to comment to find out.

I'm wasn't trying to be mean or scare you, I just wanted to provide an "accurate" response first.

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In my own (personal) opinion though (JUST an opinion), I don't think that your own Certificate number would absolutely be necessary. I'm thinking that there may be some way around it, which we'll have to wait for someone else to comment to find out.

I'm wasn't trying to be mean or scare you, I just wanted to provide an "accurate" response first.

It's totally fine you didn't scare me, I just want to find out exactly what my options are from someone who's been through the same situation. I know there have to be people who have been because there are posts on this forum asking the same question, but I couldn't find a post with an answer. This thread has been the most informative so far!

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It's totally fine you didn't scare me, I just want to find out exactly what my options are from someone who's been through the same situation. I know there have to be people who have been because there are posts on this forum asking the same question, but I couldn't find a post with an answer. This thread has been the most informative so far!

I'm wondering how you were able to obtain a U.S. passport without a CoC, because if you look at the requirements on the State Department's website, one would have to provide THEIR (not their parents') Naturalization Certificate or CoC. Perhaps they AREN'T that strict (and allow the parents to show their Certificates)?

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I'm wondering how you were able to obtain a U.S. passport without a CoC, because if you look at the requirements on the State Department's website, one would have to provide THEIR (not their parents') Naturalization Certificate or CoC. Perhaps they AREN'T that strict (and allow the parents to show their Certificates)?

Below that it says you can provide secondary proof of citizenship and that page lists that you can provide the foreign birth certificate with parent's marriage certificate and their citizenship cert so I guess that's what I did. It's been so long ago I don't even remember.

Link: http://travel.state.gov/passport/get/secondary_evidence/secondary_evidence_4315.html

Edited by notyuriy

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