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My wife is bringing a new I-Pad into Ukraine, and then taking a train to Russia with it. Will she have a problem at customs if it is still in the original box and wrapping? Is it necessary to make it appear that it is her personal I-Pad and remove all packaging? It is an $800 item. Is there some limit over which you can't bring gifts without paying a tax?

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I would do my best to hide it. If it's "new in the box" she doesn't look like a typical Ukrainian traveling home to visit family, she looks like a MOB whose rich husband handed her stacks of hundreds to bribe customs officials with.

Wrap it in a sweater, put it in her beat up backpack of a carry-on or something, and act like it doesn't exist. If they don't see it, they can't charge her for it. Hell, she could slide it between a few magazines in her hand-carried bag and they probably wouldn't notice.


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My wife is bringing a new I-Pad into Ukraine, and then taking a train to Russia with it. Will she have a problem at customs if it is still in the original box and wrapping? Is it necessary to make it appear that it is her personal I-Pad and remove all packaging? It is an $800 item. Is there some limit over which you can't bring gifts without paying a tax?

Yes, there are limits and YES she should take it out of the original box. There are also sorrupt border people in both countries that liketo shake people down for CASH. I brought computers to Alla and Sergey during my travels (laptops) and just took them out of the box and put everything into one of those zipper carrying cases and carried it on the plane with me. Oops! I forgot to bring it back with me...OH, no problem, Alla and Sergey brought them when they came.

BTW...The electricity is not a problem, they have built in transformers. They just need an adaptor OR most of the laptops have a separate cord that plugs into the transformer and you can buy a European cord in Ukraine or Russia


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Gary And Alla

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My wife is bringing a new I-Pad into Ukraine, and then taking a train to Russia with it. Will she have a problem at customs if it is still in the original box and wrapping? Is it necessary to make it appear that it is her personal I-Pad and remove all packaging? It is an $800 item. Is there some limit over which you can't bring gifts without paying a tax?

Another thing to always remember...this is Ukraine and Russia. The laws do not matter. What matters is what they can shake down people for. I never had a problem but I am a "rich American" that always travels with a computer (actually I NEVER do because when I am on vacation my job can pound sand up their @ss for all I care) but that is the template, anyway. She should have no problems, really, but try not to make it "look new".


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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I would still get a power converter in addition to a European adaptor. While they will WORK without a converter, it's bad for the system. It's fine for a week-long visit, but long-term use will eventually fry the power supply. That's why I have a computer sitting in my closet waiting to be taken to a repair place.


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I would still get a power converter in addition to a European adaptor. While they will WORK without a converter, it's bad for the system. It's fine for a week-long visit, but long-term use will eventually fry the power supply. That's why I have a computer sitting in my closet waiting to be taken to a repair place.

Not to be contrary but not my experience. Sergey has been using his computer 10 months per year in Moscow for two years. Alla's was in use, and still is when she visits, with no problems for many months before she came here.

The transformers are rated for 110-240V power and are the same as sold all over the world. That is why they have different power cords. This way they can use the same computers the world over and only need to change the power cord which is shipped with the unit.


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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Longer time line..... more probability to catch a surge over 240V.


Русский форум член.

Ensure your beneficiary makes and brings with them to the States a copy of the DS-3025 (vaccination form)

If the government is going to force me to exercise my "right" to health care, then they better start requiring people to exercise their Right to Bear Arms. - "Where's my public option rifle?"

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Longer time line..... more probability to catch a surge over 240V.

Yeah, I'd rather be safe than sorry. My problems were with (and I know other people who have had the same exact issue) using computers from Russia in the US, so maybe it's worse one way than the other. They get really, really hot. I'm glad Sergey hasn't had any problems, but I'd rather err on the side of caution than have to deal with getting something repaired. I sure wish I had.

Edited by eekee

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We have taken over a number of computers and printers for friends and family and all continue to work well. One printer has been in use since 2004.


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We have taken over a number of computers and printers for friends and family and all continue to work well. One printer has been in use since 2004.

Agreed. When the computer comes off the factory line, they have no idead where it will be sold, they are all the same. Some will get sent to the USA and will be packaged with a USA/North America power cord. Some will be sent to Europe and get a different power cord, but the transformer and internals are the same.

Some parts of Russia/Ukraine, maybe all parts, have some relatively unreliable power sources with larger than normal (or larger than we accept) variances in voltage and frequency. This is a function of a poor distribultion system or poor grounding or both. Power spikes can fry things out, no doubt, and if your electrical "converter" is actually a surge protector it may provide protection. But the protection is not from the line voltage, just from the vagaries of the system.


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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No problems with any American made computers in the FSU. All I've ever used is a 10 grivna prong adapter I got in the subway tunnel in Kharkov.


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I would still get a power converter in addition to a European adaptor. While they will WORK without a converter, it's bad for the system. It's fine for a week-long visit, but long-term use will eventually fry the power supply. That's why I have a computer sitting in my closet waiting to be taken to a repair place.

Not to be contrary but not my experience. Sergey has been using his computer 10 months per year in Moscow for two years. Alla's was in use, and still is when she visits, with no problems for many months before she came here.

The transformers are rated for 110-240V power and are the same as sold all over the world. That is why they have different power cords. This way they can use the same computers the world over and only need to change the power cord which is shipped with the unit.

Longer time line..... more probability to catch a surge over 240V.

Yeah, I'd rather be safe than sorry. My problems were with (and I know other people who have had the same exact issue) using computers from Russia in the US, so maybe it's worse one way than the other. They get really, really hot. I'm glad Sergey hasn't had any problems, but I'd rather err on the side of caution than have to deal with getting something repaired. I sure wish I had.

My job is designing battery chargers so I can speak to this a little. AC to DC conversion almost always becomes more efficient with less current. That means more efficient at higher voltage. So eekee is right that most converters are going to get hotter in the US than in Russia. But they should be designed to handle this and unless you are operating in a high ambient temperature your converter shouldn't suffer any adverse affects. It may wear out faster but not noticeably so. I would expect your power supply to outlive the useful life of your laptop in any case.

Of course, if you are using a cheap after-market power supply someone made in Russia and labeled 100-240 but never intended to actually be used at 110, you may have a problem. But reputable vendors will sell power supplies that should work everywhere.

In any case, I wouldn't get a transformer unless I was worried about the quality of my power supply. Even though your power supply efficiency will be better at 220, your system efficiency will be less considering loss in the transformer. If you are worried about surges, get a surge protector.

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No problems with any American made computers in the FSU. All I've ever used is a 10 grivna prong adapter I got in the subway tunnel in Kharkov.

Subway tunnels are the BEST place to buy stuff! :thumbs:


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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In any case, I wouldn't get a transformer unless I was worried about the quality of my power supply. Even though your power supply efficiency will be better at 220, your system efficiency will be less considering loss in the transformer. If you are worried about surges, get a surge protector.

I have a $15 multizone adapter from Radioshack that has lasted me for eight years traveling all over the place. Vika uses a $5 adapter to charge her Ukrainian cell here. Two years, no problems.


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