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davlor

Time outside US

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A couple 'o nitpicky N-400 questions from Part 7, regarding time outside the US:

Question 1:

Part 7 requests dates of travel outside the US, and also asks for 'total days out of the United States'. For some trips, the arrival date in the foreign country is the day after the departure date in America. For instance, on a trip where we left the US on 11/4/2009 and came back 11/18/2009, we arrived in Taiwan on 11/5. Do we call this 14 days (11/5-11/18) or 15 days (11/4-11/18)? Best logical interpretation is the former, but we don't want the USCIS to think we're fudging our numbers. :)

Question 2:

My wife's requesting naturalization due to marriage to a US citizen (me); she's been in the US for about 6 years (originally on a student visa), and a permanent resident for just over 3 years. Parts 7A-7B ask for trips and days outside the US for the past 5 years, so we're going back to July 2005 for those. But part 7C asks specifically for trips "since becoming a lawful permanent resident." So for this one we're only including the information for the past 3 years. Thus the info here (total number of days) is less than the numbers in 7A-7B, which also include 2005-2006. Is this the correct interpretation, or do you think the USCIS wants all three parts to reflect either the full 5 years or the 3 year green card period?

Thanks for your help everyone. :) I'm sure we're fine either way, but I always get worried about this stuff.

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A couple 'o nitpicky N-400 questions from Part 7, regarding time outside the US:

Question 1:

Part 7 requests dates of travel outside the US, and also asks for 'total days out of the United States'. For some trips, the arrival date in the foreign country is the day after the departure date in America. For instance, on a trip where we left the US on 11/4/2009 and came back 11/18/2009, we arrived in Taiwan on 11/5. Do we call this 14 days (11/5-11/18) or 15 days (11/4-11/18)? Best logical interpretation is the former, but we don't want the USCIS to think we're fudging our numbers. :)

1) Time outside the USA is the day you left the USA until the day you re-entered.... even if some of that time was spent on an airplane, it was still outside the USA


YMMV

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A couple 'o nitpicky N-400 questions from Part 7, regarding time outside the US:

Question 1:

Part 7 requests dates of travel outside the US, and also asks for 'total days out of the United States'. For some trips, the arrival date in the foreign country is the day after the departure date in America. For instance, on a trip where we left the US on 11/4/2009 and came back 11/18/2009, we arrived in Taiwan on 11/5. Do we call this 14 days (11/5-11/18) or 15 days (11/4-11/18)? Best logical interpretation is the former, but we don't want the USCIS to think we're fudging our numbers. :)

Question 2:

My wife's requesting naturalization due to marriage to a US citizen (me); she's been in the US for about 6 years (originally on a student visa), and a permanent resident for just over 3 years. Parts 7A-7B ask for trips and days outside the US for the past 5 years, so we're going back to July 2005 for those. But part 7C asks specifically for trips "since becoming a lawful permanent resident." So for this one we're only including the information for the past 3 years. Thus the info here (total number of days) is less than the numbers in 7A-7B, which also include 2005-2006. Is this the correct interpretation, or do you think the USCIS wants all three parts to reflect either the full 5 years or the 3 year green card period?

Thanks for your help everyone. :) I'm sure we're fine either way, but I always get worried about this stuff.

1. You count any days, of which you have not spent any portion of, in the United States. For example you depart on a trip on the first of the month and arrive back on the tenth, you were gone eight days (the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th), because you were in the US on the 1st, and also on the 10th. This is how I filled out my paperwork and I also asked my IO if it was the correct way to count.

2. You count the trips from the day your permanent residency started as noted on your wifes green card.

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