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U.S. marriage recognized in Russia?

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Russia
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My wife says that Russian authorities consider her single, and that we need to go through some kind of minor legal process for our marriage to be recognized in her country.

I think she called it "apostle" (sp?) copy of the marriage certificate.

Does anyone know anything about this?

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Russia
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I know just a little about this. I haven't gone through the process yet, but it's something we plan to do in the near future.

If I remember right, when I was researching what to do, it involved going to the Russian Embassy (or maybe mailing back and forth).

Then she has to register with them as a Russian citizen residing in the United States.

Next you show them a copy (with translation) of your marriage certificate.

Finally she gets the stamp in her passport (local) and the marriage is recognized.

Again, a little hazy, but I think that's the gist of it. I'll see if I can't dig up the information again if no one is able to answer this with better detail.

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Russia
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My wife says that Russian authorities consider her single, and that we need to go through some kind of minor legal process for our marriage to be recognized in her country.

I think she called it "apostle" (sp?) copy of the marriage certificate.

Does anyone know anything about this?

Unless you're going to live in Russia, who cares what they consider her marital status? If the Russians know about the marriage and she owns property in Russia, it will be charged higher fees. And if she returns to Russia, she could face other issues and costs.

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Filed: Timeline

My wife says that Russian authorities consider her single, and that we need to go through some kind of minor legal process for our marriage to be recognized in her country.

I think she called it "apostle" (sp?) copy of the marriage certificate.

Does anyone know anything about this?

There is a process, it's been discussed here, and eventually we're going to go through it too, but I'll be damned if I can remember what it is, sorry. Do a search in this forum (or wait for me to do it in a few months :)) and you'll probably come across it.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
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It's called an apostille. You can find more information about it here:

http://www.perryvisa.com/webPages/legalDefine.php

The short explanation is, it's a way to prove to another country that the document is legitimately issued rather than you just creating it yourself.


Wife's visa journey:

03/19/07: Initial mailing of I-129F.

07/07/11: U.S. Citizenship approved and Oath Ceremony!

MIL's visa journey:

07/26/11: Initial mailing of I-130.

05/22/12: Interview passed!

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Russia
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It's called an apostille. You can find more information about it here:

http://www.perryvisa...legalDefine.php

The short explanation is, it's a way to prove to another country that the document is legitimately issued rather than you just creating it yourself.

When I got married in Russia I had to bring all my documents (birth certificate, divorce papers, Intent to Marry paper, etc.) with apostille stamps. Getting an apostille stamp is easy. You simply send the documents to your home state's Secretary of State. The cost is usually about $5.00 per document and the turnaround time is a few days as a rule.

If you married in the USA, I wonder why bother registering the marriage in Russia? Is there some benefit?

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Russia
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It's called an apostille. You can find more information about it here:

http://www.perryvisa.com/webPages/legalDefine.php

The short explanation is, it's a way to prove to another country that the document is legitimately issued rather than you just creating it yourself.

Hey, just curious if you had to go through this yet. Wondering if there's any potential pitfall advice you could toss out there at us.

Or is it pretty strait forward.

Although I do suppose this could ideally branch off in two different possible ways.

1.) If she will register the marriage while living in Russia.

2.) You'll register the marriage while living in the United States.

So if you did it here or there, it would be nice to know as well. I think doing it here will require the additional step of registering your spouse as a Russian citizen residing in the states. Again, still looking.

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Russia
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Yes, apostille should be recognized in Russia. It is not difficult to obtain in US. Many Russian clerks however will simply turn this document down stating they simply do not understand this paper and insist on getting a marriage certificate they can understand. It that sense, just get married again in Russia and have a real Russian wedding! Just do not try to out drink her Russian friends or you'll be sorry or worse :)

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
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My wife says that Russian authorities consider her single, and that we need to go through some kind of minor legal process for our marriage to be recognized in her country.

I think she called it "apostle" (sp?) copy of the marriage certificate.

Does anyone know anything about this?

Russia, like most countries in the world, is signatory to treaties recognizing legal marriages in other countries including the USA. It is not, technically, correct to say that they see her as "single". She is married, it is a legal marriage. She is married here and in any of the countries that recognizes US marriages, includng Russia.

Russia, of course, has no idea she is married, nor are they aware of any other marriages that take place outside of Russia. If, for example, your US citizen neighbors, married in the US, moved to Russia...YES they are married. IF you wish for Russia to be aware of the marriage for whatever reason, then you have to register it with them as you would a marriage in Russia.

They may also require her to register her residency as the USA at the same time (they will) which can cause tax problems if you own property there. Just be sure what you are doing and what the implications are


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
Timeline

I know just a little about this. I haven't gone through the process yet, but it's something we plan to do in the near future.

If I remember right, when I was researching what to do, it involved going to the Russian Embassy (or maybe mailing back and forth).

Then she has to register with them as a Russian citizen residing in the United States.

Next you show them a copy (with translation) of your marriage certificate.

Finally she gets the stamp in her passport (local) and the marriage is recognized.

Again, a little hazy, but I think that's the gist of it. I'll see if I can't dig up the information again if no one is able to answer this with better detail.

This is because Russia states such things in passports, along with the person's "nationality" (Alla is listed as "Russian" in her Ukrainian passport) All of these things simply do not matter if you do not live there.


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Russia
Timeline

My wife says that Russian authorities consider her single, and that we need to go through some kind of minor legal process for our marriage to be recognized in her country.

I think she called it "apostle" (sp?) copy of the marriage certificate.

Does anyone know anything about this?

We tried to get this done a few years ago so that my wife could change her name in her internal passport. Before we went to Russia we had the marriage certificate translation and apostille. We brought it to the zaggs office but they would not accept it. In our county (Collier, I think the OP is in Broward so it may be the same) there is no place on the document that states my wife's new name. It just indicates that X married Y. They gave it back to us saying it meant nothing to them and did not indicate she had a new name. My wife also showed the stamp with her new name in her international passport that was done by the Russian embassy but they also refused to acknowledge it. We gave up.


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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
Timeline

We tried to get this done a few years ago so that my wife could change her name in her internal passport. Before we went to Russia we had the marriage certificate translation and apostille. We brought it to the zaggs office but they would not accept it. In our county (Collier, I think the OP is in Broward so it may be the same) there is no place on the document that states my wife's new name. It just indicates that X married Y. They gave it back to us saying it meant nothing to them and did not indicate she had a new name. My wife also showed the stamp with her new name in her international passport that was done by the Russian embassy but they also refused to acknowledge it. We gave up.

And herein lies the confusion the OPs wife may be under. Russia doesn't deny the marriage or say she is "single" but they will not change one of THEIR documents (internal or international passport) without certain documentation. They are not denying the marriage or her status but denying a name change without what they consider adequate documents.

Alla never changed her name and when I read all this I am just glad she did not. It was SO much easier and I think we have not had a question yet about it.


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

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