Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
hej1

K-1 Interview & Overstay of Japanese Visa

4 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Peru
Timeline

Hi, everyone--

I have some questions and wanted to hear about other people's experiences. Here is the situation: My fiance was in Japan and overstayed his Japanese visa (more than 10 years ago)-- this is a civil (not criminal) issue in Japan-- he was stopped at a traffic stop, found to be without proper papers and deported. He has no other blemish of any type on any record.

I want to understand how/if we need to communicate and provide documentation related to this situation, especially as it seems it will probably not appear on his Japanese police certificate as they do not report non-criminal items that happened more than 10 years ago (we are still waiting to receive it)-- not even sure if they would ever report this. Our interview is Nov 5th and we have been advised by the embassy not to change our interview date as we can submit the police certificate later (of course no visa until the certificate is provided and reviewed).

Here are my questions, in the spirit of proper disclosure and minimizing complications:

1) On the DS-156, question #38 - do we mark yes or no since it was a civil issue?

2) If we need to mark yes, what other documentation do we need to have at the interview? We have called the police stations in Japan and Japanese embassy who was not able to help us or provide any information on how to obtain documentation related to his case.

3) For anyone who may have been through this, what was your experience and did you have delays due to addiitonal reviews of your case?

Thanks so much for any help and advice. This week I started consulting with a lawyer on this, but they are still researching and have not given me any guidance yet...I figure real-life experience is always good to understand as well :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Russia
Timeline
Hi, everyone--

I have some questions and wanted to hear about other people's experiences. Here is the situation: My fiance was in Japan and overstayed his Japanese visa (more than 10 years ago)-- this is a civil (not criminal) issue in Japan-- he was stopped at a traffic stop, found to be without proper papers and deported. He has no other blemish of any type on any record.

I want to understand how/if we need to communicate and provide documentation related to this situation, especially as it seems it will probably not appear on his Japanese police certificate as they do not report non-criminal items that happened more than 10 years ago (we are still waiting to receive it)-- not even sure if they would ever report this. Our interview is Nov 5th and we have been advised by the embassy not to change our interview date as we can submit the police certificate later (of course no visa until the certificate is provided and reviewed).

Here are my questions, in the spirit of proper disclosure and minimizing complications:

1) On the DS-156, question #38 - do we mark yes or no since it was a civil issue?

2) If we need to mark yes, what other documentation do we need to have at the interview? We have called the police stations in Japan and Japanese embassy who was not able to help us or provide any information on how to obtain documentation related to his case.

3) For anyone who may have been through this, what was your experience and did you have delays due to addiitonal reviews of your case?

Thanks so much for any help and advice. This week I started consulting with a lawyer on this, but they are still researching and have not given me any guidance yet...I figure real-life experience is always good to understand as well :)

Visas to stay in Japan and any consequence of such has no bearing whatsoever on a visa petition to the US. They are two totally different things.

Edited by baron555

Phil (Lockport, near Chicago) and Alla (Lobnya, near Moscow)

As of Dec 7, 2009, now Zero miles apart (literally)!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ukraine
Timeline
Hi, everyone--

I have some questions and wanted to hear about other people's experiences. Here is the situation: My fiance was in Japan and overstayed his Japanese visa (more than 10 years ago)-- this is a civil (not criminal) issue in Japan-- he was stopped at a traffic stop, found to be without proper papers and deported. He has no other blemish of any type on any record.

I want to understand how/if we need to communicate and provide documentation related to this situation, especially as it seems it will probably not appear on his Japanese police certificate as they do not report non-criminal items that happened more than 10 years ago (we are still waiting to receive it)-- not even sure if they would ever report this. Our interview is Nov 5th and we have been advised by the embassy not to change our interview date as we can submit the police certificate later (of course no visa until the certificate is provided and reviewed).

Here are my questions, in the spirit of proper disclosure and minimizing complications:

1) On the DS-156, question #38 - do we mark yes or no since it was a civil issue?

2) If we need to mark yes, what other documentation do we need to have at the interview? We have called the police stations in Japan and Japanese embassy who was not able to help us or provide any information on how to obtain documentation related to his case.

3) For anyone who may have been through this, what was your experience and did you have delays due to addiitonal reviews of your case?

Thanks so much for any help and advice. This week I started consulting with a lawyer on this, but they are still researching and have not given me any guidance yet...I figure real-life experience is always good to understand as well :)

The question asks if you were "arrested or convicted of any offense or crime..." Since they separate "offenses" from "crime" I would say you answer YES. However it is not an offense that would disqualify you for a visa to the US and the US does not care if he overstayed a visa in Japan. Of course he will have to have a Japanese police certificate (required of any country where he lived for more than 6 months after age 16) and that will show no criminal offenses. I would attach trhe Japanese police cetificate and a letter of explanation of the answer to question 38.


VERMONT! I Reject Your Reality...and Substitute My Own!

Gary And Alla

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Peru
Timeline
Hi, everyone--

I have some questions and wanted to hear about other people's experiences. Here is the situation: My fiance was in Japan and overstayed his Japanese visa (more than 10 years ago)-- this is a civil (not criminal) issue in Japan-- he was stopped at a traffic stop, found to be without proper papers and deported. He has no other blemish of any type on any record.

I want to understand how/if we need to communicate and provide documentation related to this situation, especially as it seems it will probably not appear on his Japanese police certificate as they do not report non-criminal items that happened more than 10 years ago (we are still waiting to receive it)-- not even sure if they would ever report this. Our interview is Nov 5th and we have been advised by the embassy not to change our interview date as we can submit the police certificate later (of course no visa until the certificate is provided and reviewed).

Here are my questions, in the spirit of proper disclosure and minimizing complications:

1) On the DS-156, question #38 - do we mark yes or no since it was a civil issue?

2) If we need to mark yes, what other documentation do we need to have at the interview? We have called the police stations in Japan and Japanese embassy who was not able to help us or provide any information on how to obtain documentation related to his case.

3) For anyone who may have been through this, what was your experience and did you have delays due to addiitonal reviews of your case?

Thanks so much for any help and advice. This week I started consulting with a lawyer on this, but they are still researching and have not given me any guidance yet...I figure real-life experience is always good to understand as well :)

The question asks if you were "arrested or convicted of any offense or crime..." Since they separate "offenses" from "crime" I would say you answer YES. However it is not an offense that would disqualify you for a visa to the US and the US does not care if he overstayed a visa in Japan. Of course he will have to have a Japanese police certificate (required of any country where he lived for more than 6 months after age 16) and that will show no criminal offenses. I would attach trhe Japanese police cetificate and a letter of explanation of the answer to question 38.

Thanks for your help! That does make sense-- I guess "offense" is meant to mean civil offense?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×
×
  • Create New...