Jump to content

Andrew-Traci

Members
  • Content Count

    71
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Andrew-Traci got a reaction from TBoneTX in Help with bad past   
    No... do not place words in my mouth. I have never stated that if it isn't on the Police Report it didn't happen and never would. The USCIS clearly states that you must obtain a Police Certificate for every place you have lived since age 16. It further states that you need to provided court records for all criminal charges showing on such reports regardless if they are older than 15 years. Provide them with the reports they ask for, provide them with all the back up documentation they ask for. Done. Move on to the next requirement.
    During the waiver processing period the USCIS will do extensive background checks. If the applicant has ever been in the US the DOS will be asked to provide the applicant's fingerprints to the FBI for their checks to make sure no crimes were committed while visiting. There is always the possibilty that some thing can or may show up that needs to be addressed further - at which stage you should be forthright and honest and again, provide them with what they ask for. I don't necessarily think it's uncommon for people to forget things when filling out the extensive forms that we must do. With some the mere thought of completing all these forms is cause for extreme stress. However, there is a difference between forgetting and outright lying which should never be condoned - you will get done for it.
    Bottom line you provide the USCIS with what they ask for. Do this and you shouldn't have problems. As far as the N400, I am aware of the application and the questions asked on it - especially the section on Moral Character. Straight forward "yes" and "no" questions with a section below them to give additional information if you ticked "yes" to any of the questions. When the time comes that form will be completed in the same manner in which all other forms have been completed - HONESTLY.
    As far as rolling dice - No thanks. I'm not much of a gambler, especially with regards to my life - We did everything that was asked of us, provided everything that was asked of us, we were honest and spoke from the heart in our personal letters, and the end result was favorable. I'll just leave it at that. Carry on...
  2. Like
    Andrew-Traci got a reaction from Traci - Andrew in The 2010 London Waiver List   
    OMG - I can not believe my hubby posted the toilet analogy ... He had me laughing when he was explaining it to me on the phone!!! Was trying to stay away from here for awhile, but just had to reply to this comment - Hope it brought some chuckles to all of you... You sure know how to make me feel better hubby - guess that's why I love you so much!! Speaking of laughing.... I gotta pee Bye!!
  3. Like
    Andrew-Traci reacted to Traci - Andrew in citizenship or divorce first?   
    Hi Biter
    I concur with the last couple of posters who have hit the nail on the head.
    He does not want you to stay on the Green Card for the remainder of the 10 years as he would be financially responsible for you as you are unable to seek social security for 10 years or 40 quarters of work life.. So his interest in getting you your US Citizenship is purely selfish on his part, as it will free him from being bound to the Immigration form that he signed to say that he will support you for 10 years.
    In fact if you did not become a USC he would have to pay you to live and support you for the next 5 years, if he failed to do so you could end up suing him for the support payments in court.
    The decision that you make has got to be yours based on your circumstances.. I hope you make the right one.
    Wishing you all the best
    Andrew
  4. Like
    Andrew-Traci got a reaction from treehugger in THE IMMIGRATION FRAUD CON   
    Forgive me for failing to concur with you on what you consider to be ranting. For those of us who are waiting on waiver decisions many of us can relate to the information posted. For those who may face possible visa denials due to CIMT’s and who have done any travelling to the US and failed to tick “yes” to question B, the information posted here is invaluable. We wish that we had known this information when we first applied for our K1 visa as it would have saved us a lot of stress, time & money, because if we knew that we were going to get a misrep/fraud charge against us, we would have gone straight for the K3/CR1 because You must have a qualifying family member in order to qualify for an extreme hardship waiver which is a requirement if you receive a denial for misrep/fraud. You can not apply for an extreme hardship waiver to cover misrepresentation or immigration fraud under a K1 Visa. Had we known this we could have foregone the K1 Visa, gotten married sooner, applied for the K3 and submitted all required waivers at the interview. We could have saved ourselves a year of waiting for nothing (K1), not to mention the additional costs (K1 Visa + Legal).
    You have not had to go through the waiver process in order to obtain a visa. You have no idea of the anguish and frustration that those going through this process deal with. I don’t expect you to understand the meaning behind the post, nor the significance of how important the manner in which a “piece of paper” is worded can affect a person’s life. Had the wording on the VWP been as concise as it now is on the ESTA there would have been no way to misinterpret the question. Have you ever been arrested or convicted for any reason is a very clear cut “yes” or “no” answer. On the other hand the term moral turpitude is a very grey area and quite easy to misinterpret. Apparent from the number of applicants who have CIMT’s and have also been hit with misrepresentation/fraud, an automatic denial.
    If the post you are calling ranting can help even one couple make it through the visa process with less heartache than my husband & I, along with others we have met, than it has served its purpose. After all, this site is primarily used to ask "purposeful" questions, and post information to assist and support others.
  5. Like
    Andrew-Traci got a reaction from Traci - Andrew in THE IMMIGRATION FRAUD CON   
    Forgive me for failing to concur with you on what you consider to be ranting. For those of us who are waiting on waiver decisions many of us can relate to the information posted. For those who may face possible visa denials due to CIMT’s and who have done any travelling to the US and failed to tick “yes” to question B, the information posted here is invaluable. We wish that we had known this information when we first applied for our K1 visa as it would have saved us a lot of stress, time & money, because if we knew that we were going to get a misrep/fraud charge against us, we would have gone straight for the K3/CR1 because You must have a qualifying family member in order to qualify for an extreme hardship waiver which is a requirement if you receive a denial for misrep/fraud. You can not apply for an extreme hardship waiver to cover misrepresentation or immigration fraud under a K1 Visa. Had we known this we could have foregone the K1 Visa, gotten married sooner, applied for the K3 and submitted all required waivers at the interview. We could have saved ourselves a year of waiting for nothing (K1), not to mention the additional costs (K1 Visa + Legal).
    You have not had to go through the waiver process in order to obtain a visa. You have no idea of the anguish and frustration that those going through this process deal with. I don’t expect you to understand the meaning behind the post, nor the significance of how important the manner in which a “piece of paper” is worded can affect a person’s life. Had the wording on the VWP been as concise as it now is on the ESTA there would have been no way to misinterpret the question. Have you ever been arrested or convicted for any reason is a very clear cut “yes” or “no” answer. On the other hand the term moral turpitude is a very grey area and quite easy to misinterpret. Apparent from the number of applicants who have CIMT’s and have also been hit with misrepresentation/fraud, an automatic denial.
    If the post you are calling ranting can help even one couple make it through the visa process with less heartache than my husband & I, along with others we have met, than it has served its purpose. After all, this site is primarily used to ask "purposeful" questions, and post information to assist and support others.
  6. Like
    Andrew-Traci reacted to Traci - Andrew in THE IMMIGRATION FRAUD CON   
    At least my post on this Forum is informational to others and tells people about the prospects of what to expect, as and when they have the interview at the embassy and if they have a CIMT against them, because I know we were not ready for this particular offence being pinned on us...
    So if you have something relevant to say about this topic or you have been through the same thing, then I and others will welcome your comments, however if you just want to make unclear and unwelcome remarks then please do as your offensive member photo states.
  7. Like
    Andrew-Traci reacted to Traci - Andrew in THE IMMIGRATION FRAUD CON   
    First of all, I would like to compliment you on a very well put together response to my post, it is backed up by links to the information where the information was gathered from.
    However I must say that I was also in the military and have a disciplined mind and am considered very logical, my argument to your reply would be this:
    Any traveler visiting a country is not going to look up every single immigration law or local law of the country in question before travel, some people do not have the time whilst some do not have the ability to do such research either academically or financially. I have read some of the USCIS definitions of the CIMT and one section tells you that manslaughter is a CIMT however it may not be depending on the circumstances, now this to me as a layman who looks things up thinks that that is about as clear as mud.
    How can you expect Joe public to understand exactly what a CIMT covers when even Lawyers are not 100% certain themselves and have to read up on the latest interpretation from the USCIS guide, people who are deciding to emigrate to another country I can understand them getting very involved with what is or is not required to satisfy the decision making process, but for your average tourist who works hard all year to then take off 2 weeks for a vacation is not going to be bothered looking up questions to which they have no knowledge of until they receive a piece of paper 1 hour from landing, they will have to use their own judgment as to decipher the wording on the questions and nobody on-board that aircraft will have a clue what crimes are CIMT's I assure you.
    So this only leaves the possibility of the traveler to ask the border guards, whom are very busy and have very long lines of people waiting to get through the immigration section for either further travel or to get on with there holiday. The last thing that the border guards want is every plane load of passengers (about 200 - 300) asking them to define if whatever they have done when they were young 25 plus years ago, fits the CIMT question... This would make travel in to any country extremely slow and cause massive lines.
    So instead most travelers use commonsense which means they look at the question and think, well I did commit a crime of theft when I was in my late teens, now does that fit a CIMT? well CIMT in bundled in with Drug traffickers (Major Offense) Drug Users (Fairly Major Offense) People that have spent 5 years in jail (Again this must be for a Major offense) so CIMT? well that must mean any other crime that was a Major Offense, not a crime of theft involving a fine? surely, so they say NO to the question... not fraudulently but in a misinformed way, which is the problem... but only when that traveler decides to emigrate, then it is a big issue !!
    You can surely see from a logical point of view that this is how most people travel and they would make the same mistake every time they travel until they try and emigrate and only then does the problem occur, which I believe USCIS actually uses to their advantage to help keep down the number of approvals on immigration levels.. (That is my personal opinion)
    In the UK there has been a organization in place for a number of years now, to help make any forms or important information clear to read, this means less fine print on contracts and it must be written clearly and in plain english...
    This organization needed to be used on the VWP form so that question B was broken down or made clearer so you had to answer YES to the question if you had committed any crime, then the border guard could spot the question had been ticked YES and the traveler would then be asked to detail the offense. That would be the best way of doing it, but hey this would not fit in with being able to charge misguided travelers when emigrating with Immigration Fraud now would it
    Regards
    Andrew
  8. Like
    Andrew-Traci got a reaction from Traci - Andrew in THE IMMIGRATION FRAUD CON   
    Forgive me for failing to concur with you on what you consider to be ranting. For those of us who are waiting on waiver decisions many of us can relate to the information posted. For those who may face possible visa denials due to CMIT’s and who have done any travelling to the US and failed to tick “yes” to question B, the information posted here is invaluable. I wish that we had known this site existed when we first applied for our K1 visa and someone had posted this information. It would have saved us a lot of stress and waiting. You must have a qualifying family member in order to qualify for an extreme hardship waiver – a requirement if you receive a denial for misrepresentation a required Had we known this we could have foregone the K1 Visa, gotten married sooner, applied for the K3 and submitted all required waivers at the interview. We could have saved ourselves a year of waiting for nothing, not to mention the additional costs.
    You have not had to go through the waiver process in order to obtain a visa. You have no ideal of the anguish and frustration that those going through this process deal with. I don’t expect you to understand the meaning behind the post, nor the significance of how important the manner in which a “piece of paper” is worded can affect a person’s life. Had the wording on the VWP been as concise as it now is on the ESTA there would have been no way to misinterpret the question. Have you ever been arrested or convicted for any reason is a very clear cut “yes” or “no” answer. On the other hand the term moral turpitude is a very grey area and quite easy to misinterpret. Apparent from the number of applicants who have CMIT’s and have also been hit with misrepresentation, an automatic denial.
    If the post you are calling ranting can help even one couple make it through the visa process with less heartache than my husband & I, along with others we have met, than it has served its purpose. After all, this site is primarily used to ask "purposeful" questions, and post information to assist an support others.
×
×
  • Create New...