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can my fiance make his sibling a co sponsor even if they not living in the same house? and can we make his parents a co sponsor too even if they have previously submitted affidavit of support to his other sibling?

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12 minutes ago, milock said:

can my fiance make his sibling a co sponsor even if they not living in the same house? and can we make his parents a co sponsor too even if they have previously submitted affidavit of support to his other sibling?

If his sibling is a USC and makes over 125% of the current poverty level than yes, his sibling can sponsor you. Living in the same house is not a requirement. However, if the sponsor does live in the same house I believe they file a I-864a(this is AOS phase. I can’t remember if  there is a similar document for the K-1 I-134 phase)

 

His parents may cosponsor as well if they meet the same requirements I stated above. You can have up to two co sponsors. His parent(s) can sponsor you if they have sponsored someone else but odds are if it has not been 10 years they are still legally responsible for the other person they sponsored. That’s something they need to look into. Is that person still in the US? Are they a USC yet? Are they still a GC holder? What visa did they use to come over? As long as they can prove that they make enough money to support their house hold (this includes the two of them, likely the person they’ve sponsored in the past, you, and any other dependents they may have) you won’t have an issue. They have to disclose if they’ve sponsored someone else in the past. 

 

If his sibling is a USC, makes over 125% poverty level for their household then I would forget the parents and stick with the sibling. But keep in mind if his sibling has any children because they would have to make 125% poverty level for their household including you and any children they may have.


K-1 VISA

I129F Sent: 08/23/2017

NOA 1: 08/25/2017

NOA 2: 02/27/2018

NVC Received: 03/14/2018

NVC Case #: 03/15/2018

NVC Left: 03/24/2018

Embassy Received: 03/28/2018

Medical: 05/08/2018

Interview: 05/15/2018 

Visa issued: 05/18/2018

Visa received: 05/23/2018 

 

AOS

POE: 06/07/2018

SSN applied: 06/12/2018

SSN received: 06/28/2018

AOS Sent: 07/27/2018

Biometrics: 08/23/2018

Interview: 10/30/2018

Approval: 10/30/2018 

NOA2: 11/05/2018

Green card Received: 11/08/2018

 

 

NO MORE USCIS UNTIL ROC!!!!!😁

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, K & R said:

If his sibling is a USC and makes over 125% of the current poverty level than yes, his sibling can sponsor you. Living in the same house is not a requirement. However, if the sponsor does live in the same house I believe they file a I-864a(this is AOS phase. I can’t remember if  there is a similar document for the K-1 I-134 phase)

 

His parents may cosponsor as well if they meet the same requirements I stated above. You can have up to two co sponsors. His parent(s) can sponsor you if they have sponsored someone else but odds are if it has not been 10 years they are still legally responsible for the other person they sponsored. That’s something they need to look into. Is that person still in the US? Are they a USC yet? Are they still a GC holder? What visa did they use to come over? As long as they can prove that they make enough money to support their house hold (this includes the two of them, likely the person they’ve sponsored in the past, you, and any other dependents they may have) you won’t have an issue. They have to disclose if they’ve sponsored someone else in the past. 

 

If his sibling is a USC, makes over 125% poverty level for their household then I would forget the parents and stick with the sibling. But keep in mind if his sibling has any children because they would have to make 125% poverty level for their household including you and any children they may have.

thank you for that info thank you

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