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Layla88

Travel abroad pending citizenship

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I applied for N400 in June 2018 based on the 5 year rule. My case should be finished in July 2019. I am considering "taking break" and travel internationally for a couple of months, this would involve leaving current job and moving out from my current house. Are these changes going to negatively impact my citizenship application? Another question is How much are they questioning previous marriage if you got your permanent residency per spouse?

Thanks

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Yes they could.  First a couple of months can be risky because it is not a given you will be let back in without a challenge.  There is no fixed rule on how long a green card holder can be absent.  A rule of thumb is less than 6 months before you need a reentry visa but it is not a given. So that is always a risk.

 

Second,  you don't want to be away when you get your interview date.  You have a month's notice but it could prove expensive to have to return hastily.  

 

Third, you definitely need to maintain a permanent residence at all times within the USA because without one you can be considered to have abandoned your residency.   So if you move out you also have to move in somewhere else.  Not having a job will no look good at an interview. 

 

Finally,  I think you are saying your got your green card via marriage.  Are you now divorced?  If so, then see https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/can-i-apply-citizenship-i-ve-divorced-the-person-got-me-green-card.html  

 

Given the above I would think again about leaving the country.

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On 11/30/2018 at 10:44 PM, flyingkites said:

Yes they could.  First a couple of months can be risky because it is not a given you will be let back in without a challenge.  There is no fixed rule on how long a green card holder can be absent.  A rule of thumb is less than 6 months before you need a reentry visa but it is not a given. So that is always a risk.

 

Second,  you don't want to be away when you get your interview date.  You have a month's notice but it could prove expensive to have to return hastily.  

 

Third, you definitely need to maintain a permanent residence at all times within the USA because without one you can be considered to have abandoned your residency.   So if you move out you also have to move in somewhere else.  Not having a job will no look good at an interview. 

 

Finally,  I think you are saying your got your green card via marriage.  Are you now divorced?  If so, then see https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/can-i-apply-citizenship-i-ve-divorced-the-person-got-me-green-card.html  

 

Given the above I would think again about leaving the country.

 

On 12/1/2018 at 9:25 AM, Layla88 said:

Thank you! Very helpful. Just in theory, changing jobs and moving within the US won’t raise any flags right? 

Going out of US for 2 months is never a problem. They don't care much if the visits are short n infrequent. So you can take ur break without worrying. I applied in June '18 and I am currently out of US for 2 months because I know for sure that it takes pretty long for my field office to schedule an interview for me. So you can worrielessly take ur break but check ur field office trends to make sure you don't get an interview date while u r away! 

Edited by love_my_wife

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On 11/30/2018 at 12:14 PM, flyingkites said:

First a couple of months can be risky because it is not a given you will be let back in without a challenge.  There is no fixed rule on how long a green card holder can be absent. 

Your last statement is correct.  And it's contradicting your first statement, which is basically incorrect and unsupported (assuming "a couple" actually means 2, not 6+). 

 

On 11/30/2018 at 12:14 PM, flyingkites said:

Second,  you don't want to be away when you get your interview date.  You have a month's notice but it could prove expensive to have to return hastily.  

That's a completely different issue and not what the OP asked about.  Could be easily handled by purchasing an open ticket. 

 

On 11/30/2018 at 12:14 PM, flyingkites said:

Not having a job will no look good at an interview. 

Why?  Having a job is not a legal requirement for naturalization.  Do you have any evidence for this statement?

 

On 11/30/2018 at 12:14 PM, flyingkites said:

Given the above I would think again about leaving the country.

Thinking is good, but jumping to unsupported conclusions is not. 

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On 11/30/2018 at 10:55 PM, Layla88 said:

Thank you! Very helpful. Just in theory, changing jobs and moving within the US won’t raise any flags right? 

No that is OK.  But not having a job, having no fixed abode and being out of the country just before your interview is not a great idea.  All three factors together indicate no actual connection to USA.

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Thanks for all replies. I was talking about 1-2 months outside the country. I know there is no way to tell for sure, but I was actually just fine traveling out of country for 3-4 months twice a year when I was in school in Europe few years ago. I may take a trip out but will make it short. 

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