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Dear VJ-ers,

I am a PR of Canada. I live here over 3 years and I am eligible to apply for citizenship. I got married with US citizen on Sep 2012 and I am decided to move to States and I -130 is in process at National Benefit Center.

Will it be effect for my CR1 visa if I applied Canada citizenship? In the application form of citizenship, I have to write if I am the PR of any other country. If I apply within this month or next month, I have to say NO as I havent received CR-1 visa yet.

Once I moved to states, I have to inform OHIP and others from Canada, right. SO they will easily know that I am not here and moved to States.

Any suggestion will be highly appreciated.

Thanking you all in advance.

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It shouldn't affect your application for a CR-1 visa, although, if you become a Canadian citizen before the CR-1 visa is approved you will have to notify them of the 'addition' to your citizenship or the 'substitution' of your citizenship if your country of origin does not recognize dual citizenship.

It may or may not affect your application for Canadian citizenship. Right now, you are not a PR of any other country except Canada so you can answer that honestly 'no'. Both the CR-1 visa and the Canadian citizenship process takes time, however, and you may find yourself getting the CR-1 approved before the Canadian citizenship is approved. It is not just the matter of passing the citizenship exam and interview - you have to take the oath as well. The problem is that you will probably receive the CR-1 visa before your Canadian citizenship, which currently has a 21 month processing time from receipt of the application to receiving the oath. http://www.cic.gc.ca...-processing.asp

Once you receive the CR-1 visa you have 6 months from the date the visa is issued until it expires. You need to enter the US and take up permanent residence before it expires. Once you take up permanent residence in the US you are no longer accruing residency in Canada. You can delay your entry to the US for 6 months but after that the CR-1 expires.

Becoming a PR of the US with a CR-1 visa may compromise your ability to become a Canadian citizen. There are residency requirements in order to apply for citizenship, and you have to meet all of the residency requirements which include residing in Canada 3 of the 4 years immediately prior to applying for residency. Depending on how long it takes to process the CR-1 and the Canadian Citizenship applications, you may be living in the US long enough to no longer meet the Canadian citizenship residency requirements. You do have the option to delay taking up your CR-1 when it is approved for up to 6 months and this might buy you enough time to qualify for citizenship and receive citizenship before you become a US PR. Check here under Appendix A for requirements to maintain PR residency and citizenship:

</h3>

http://www.cic.gc.ca...C.asp#appendixA

<h3>Minimum residency obligations

If you have been a permanent resident for Five (5) years or more

  • you must have been physically present in Canada for a minimum of 730 days within the past five (5) years.

If you have been a permanent resident for less than five (5) years

  • you must show that you will be able to meet the minimum of 730 days physical presence in Canada at the five (5)-year mark.

Here are the requirements for applying for Canadian citizenship: http://www.cic.gc.ca...eligibility.asp

Edited by Kathryn41

“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

5892822976_477b1a77f7_z.jpg

Another Member of the VJ Fluffy Kitty Posse!

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It shouldn't affect your application for a CR-1 visa, although, if you become a Canadian citizen before the CR-1 visa is approved you will have to notify them of the 'addition' to your citizenship or the 'substitution' of your citizenship if your country of origin does not recognize dual citizenship.

It may or may not affect your application for Canadian citizenship. Right now, you are not a PR of any other country except Canada so you can answer that honestly 'no'. Both the CR-1 visa and the Canadian citizenship process takes time, however, and you may find yourself getting the CR-1 approved before the Canadian citizenship is approved. It is not just the matter of passing the citizenship exam and interview - you have to take the oath as well. The problem is that you will probably receive the CR-1 visa before your Canadian citizenship, which currently has a 21 month processing time from receipt of the application to receiving the oath. http://www.cic.gc.ca...-processing.asp

Once you receive the CR-1 visa you have 6 months from the date the visa is issued until it expires. You need to enter the US and take up permanent residence before it expires. Once you take up permanent residence in the US you are no longer accruing residency in Canada. You can delay your entry to the US for 6 months but after that the CR-1 expires.

Becoming a PR of the US with a CR-1 visa may compromise your ability to become a Canadian citizen. There are residency requirements in order to apply for citizenship, and you have to meet all of the residency requirements which include residing in Canada 3 of the 4 years immediately prior to applying for residency. Depending on how long it takes to process the CR-1 and the Canadian Citizenship applications, you may be living in the US long enough to no longer meet the Canadian citizenship residency requirements. You do have the option to delay taking up your CR-1 when it is approved for up to 6 months and this might buy you enough time to qualify for citizenship and receive citizenship before you become a US PR. Check here under Appendix A for requirements to maintain PR residency and citizenship:

</h3>

Here are the requirements for applying for Canadian citizenship: http://www.cic.gc.ca...eligibility.asp

Thank you so much, Kathryn41 and all VJ memebers. I feel like clear enough after I read this. Thanks again.

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