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Eisbrecher

J-1 visa to a F-1 visa

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Filed: Timeline

I have a friend who is currently in the US on a J-1 visa but she would now like to become a student and study in the US, however, we don't know the process that is required to do so. Is there a way she can switch or apply for the F-1 visa while she's here in the United States? I know she has to be accepted into a college first before she can even apply for the F-1 visa. Does she need to take the TOEFL before she even begins the application process for the F-1? If so, would it be possible to attend the college without taking it or would it be possible to take the TOEFL within the United States? Also if she would apply for the F-1 visa how long would she wait to either be approved or denied for the F-1?

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Filed: Timeline

I have a friend who is currently in the US on a J-1 visa but she would now like to become a student and study in the US, however, we don't know the process that is required to do so. Is there a way she can switch or apply for the F-1 visa while she's here in the United States? I know she has to be accepted into a college first before she can even apply for the F-1 visa. Does she need to take the TOEFL before she even begins the application process for the F-1? If so, would it be possible to attend the college without taking it or would it be possible to take the TOEFL within the United States? Also if she would apply for the F-1 visa how long would she wait to either be approved or denied for the F-1?

Depending on what J-1 program she's in, TOEFL might be waved. I was an exchange student back in the day on J-1, and applied for F-1 the next year, had my TOEFL waved. It depends how well she speaks English really.

You cannot apply for an F-1 visa from inside the US. After being accepted into an accredited US educational institution, the application is made online and you interview at the embassy/consulate where you live.

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Filed: Timeline

Depending on what J-1 program she's in, TOEFL might be waved. I was an exchange student back in the day on J-1, and applied for F-1 the next year, had my TOEFL waved. It depends how well she speaks English really.

You cannot apply for an F-1 visa from inside the US. After being accepted into an accredited US educational institution, the application is made online and you interview at the embassy/consulate where you live.

Thank you so much for your reply. Well, they are here working at a resort. Their English was assessed at the US Embassy in their home country from a scale 1 being the worst and 5 being the best. They got a 5/5 so their English is very close to a native English speaker. I would like to clarify if it is even possible to attain a F-1 while they are here on a J-1. Or would they have to finish their J-1 visa go back to their home country and apply for a F-1 there?

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Filed: Timeline

Thank you so much for your reply. Well, they are here working at a resort. Their English was assessed at the US Embassy in their home country from a scale 1 being the worst and 5 being the best. They got a 5/5 so their English is very close to a native English speaker. I would like to clarify if it is even possible to attain a F-1 while they are here on a J-1. Or would they have to finish their J-1 visa go back to their home country and apply for a F-1 there?

All F-1 applications have to be sent from abroad, and interview done in their country.

Also, it is important to note that many J-1 visas are subject to a 2 year foreign residency requirement. If you look at the bottom of the visa, it'll say whether or not the foreign residency requirement applies. If it does, the J-1 visa holder cannot apply for a new long-term visa for 2 years. If not, they're good to go.

I had already been an exchange student in the US and spoke English pretty much fluently, so my TOEFL was waived by the school. When I got to the interview the CO didn't even ask about TOEFL.

Edited by jaejayC

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Also, it is important to note that many J-1 visas are subject to a 2 year foreign residency requirement. If you look at the bottom of the visa, it'll say whether or not the foreign residency requirement applies. If it does, the J-1 visa holder cannot apply for a new long-term visa for 2 years. If not, they're good to go.

Actually, a person who has had a J-1 visa, is subject to the 2 year HRR, and has not yet spent those 2 years back home, is still eligible for an F1, or a new J1 as well. The rule is that..

If the exchange visitor is subject to the two-year home-country physical presence (foreign residence) requirement, he or she cannot change his/her status to that of H, L, K, or immigrant lawful permanent resident (LPR) until he or she has returned to his/her home country for at least two-years or received a waiver of that requirement.

Regarding the TOEFL requirement, my understanding is that it is more a requirement of the school than the Immigration Officials. Most colleges and universities require TOEFL from foreign students unless certain conditions are met (such as in the case of jaejay), and the TOEFL sscores have to be provided together with the original school application. Once the university has sent the foreign student the I-20 and other documents needed for the visa interview, it is the assumption of the IO that the school has already made sure the student speaks English on a fluent enough level to study in America.

Edited by Little_My

Adjustment of Status from F-1 to Legal Permanent Resident

02/11/2011 Married at Manhattan City Hall

03/03/2011 - Day 0 - AOS -package mailed to Chicago Lockbox

03/04/2011 - Day 1 - AOS -package signed for at USCIS

03/09/2011 - Day 6 - E-mail notification received for all petitions

03/10/2011 - Day 7 - Checks cashed

03/11/2011 - Day 8 - NOA 1 received for all 4 forms

03/21/2011 - Day 18 - Biometrics letter received, biometrics scheduled for 04/14/2011

03/31/2011 - Day 28 - Successful walk-in biometrics done

05/12/2011 - Day 70 - EAD Arrived, issued on 05/02

06/14/2011 - Day 103 - E-mail notice: Interview letter mailed, interview scheduled for July 20th

07/20/2011 - Day 139 - Interview at Federal Plaza USCIS location

07/22/2011 - Day 141 - E-mail approval notice received (Card production)

07/27/2011 - Day 146 - 2nd Card Production Email received

07/28/2011 - Day 147 - Post-Decision Activity Email from USCIS

08/04/2011 - Day 154 - Husband returns home from abroad; Welcome Letter and GC have arrived in the mail

("Resident since" date on the GC is 07/20/2011

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