Paul & Mallory's US Immigration Timeline

blank avatar   Petitioner's Name: Mallory
Beneficiary's Name: Paul
VJ Member: Paul & Mallory
Country: Sweden

Last Updated: 2019-03-26
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Immigration Checklist for Mallory & Paul:

USCIS I-129F Petition:      
Dept of State K1 Visa:    
USCIS I-485 Petition:  
USCIS I-765 Petition:      
USCIS I-131 Petition:      
USCIS I-751 Petition:  
USCIS N-400 Petition:  


K1 Visa
Event Date
Service Center : California Service Center
Transferred? No
Consulate : Sweden
I-129F Sent : 2017-06-05
I-129F NOA1 : 2017-06-12
I-129F RFE(s) :
RFE Reply(s) :
I-129F NOA2 : 2017-12-01
NVC Received : 2018-01-17
Date Case #, IIN, and BIN assigned : 2018-01-18
NVC Left : 2018-01-18
Consulate Received :
Packet 3 Received : 2018-01-24
Packet 3 Sent :
Packet 4 Received :
Interview Date : 2018-02-22
Interview Result : Approved
Second Interview
(If Required):
Second Interview Result:
Visa Received : 2018-03-05
US Entry : 2018-05-16
Marriage : 2018-05-26
Comments :
Processing
Estimates/Stats :
Your I-129f was approved in 172 days from your NOA1 date.

Your interview took 255 days from your I-129F NOA1 date.


Port of Entry Review
Event Date
Port of Entry : Charlotte
POE Date : 2018-05-16
Got EAD Stamp : No
Biometrics Taken :
Harassment Level : 0
Comments :


Adjustment of Status
Event Date
CIS Office : Greer SC
Date Filed : 2018-06-30
NOA Date : 2018-07-06
RFE(s) :
Bio. Appt. : 2018-07-25
AOS Transfer** :
Interview Date : 2018-09-18
Approval / Denial Date : 2018-09-18
Approved : Yes
Got I551 Stamp : Yes
Greencard Received: 2018-09-25
Comments : Our interview was scheduled for 1:05pm. We arrived early and entered around 12:40pm - we were back in the car headed home by 1:30. Mild airport-style security upon entry into the building, then directed to a separate room to wait, where the officer out front said someone would call us once they were ready. The room was similar to a doctor's office waiting room, without any windows, clocks, television, or background music. Silent room with a bunch of chairs, not a lot of other people waiting. After waiting maybe 10 or 15 minutes, someone came from a back room and called us (my husband). She took us to a separate office where we were sworn in under oath and sat down across from her at her desk. Most questions were directed towards the beneficiary, my husband. A majority of the questions asked were similar to the ones presented on the AOS application (are you involved in terrorism, etc.). She asked the beneficiary his current address, his parents information, and his basic information (DOB, etc.). She confirmed his biological details on his application, such as hair color, etc. The only question presented to us as a couple was how we met. We provided her our proofs, including various photographs of family and social functions stateside, including our civil ceremony when we got married, and from my visit to Sweden before Paul came home to the states. She looked through each one with us and had us point out who people were, where we were, etc. Examples of proofs we provided included: joint bank account statements (copy of the first statement reflecting my husband on the account, and a copy of the most recent one), copy of our updated lease and renter's insurance showing him as a tenant along with me, proof of him being added to my health insurance and added as my beneficiary for my retirement account. The interview was entirely painless and felt more like conversation than an interview. She told us we looked great, was pleased with the amount of evidence we had for having only been married a few months, and said she would put Approved in the system once his criminal background check came back. His approval letter arrived in the mail that following Saturday, and the Green Card arrived exactly 1 week later!


Employment Authorization Document
Event Date
CIS Office : Chicago National Office
Filing Method : Mail
Filing Instance : First
Date Filed : 2018-06-30
NOA Date : 2018-07-06
RFE(s) :
Bio. Appt. :
Approved Date :
Date Card Received :
Comments : EAD N/A due to Green Card being issued prior to combo card.
Processing
Estimates/Stats :
Based on timeline data, your EAD may be adjudicated between December 31, 2018 and January 29, 2019*.

If this date range has passed or your application is past due per USCIS processing times then you should consider calling the USCIS to inquire on your petition. If you have been approved please update your timeline.


Advance Parole
Event Date
CIS Office : Chicago National Office
Filing Method :  
Filing Instance : First
Date Filed : 2018-06-30
NOA Date : 2018-07-06
RFE(s) :
Date Received :
Comments : AP N/A due to Green Card being issued prior to combo card.
Processing
Estimates/Stats :
Based on timeline data, your AP may be adjudicated between January 2, 2019 and January 31, 2019*.

If this date range has passed or your application is past due per USCIS processing times then you should consider calling the USCIS to inquire on your petition. If you have been approved please update your timeline.


Member Reviews:

Consulate Review: Sweden
Review Topic: K1 Visa
Event Description
Review Date : March 2, 2018
Embassy Review : Mallory (the American) was able to plan a visit to Sweden during the time Paul's interview was scheduled, which was on February 22 (a Thursday). Paul resides in Gothenburg, which is a few hours away from Stockholm, so we booked a hotel for the night before and after the interview and took the train from GBG to Stockholm via MTR, which was a very pleasant trip that lasted about 3 hours each way. We picked the Radisson Blu Viking Hotel in Stockholm because it is literally right beside Central Station in Stockholm, so we were right there as soon as we got off the train and also had many amenities in walking distance, such as stores and restaurants located in the station. This hotel was very nice and worked for us, so we would definitely recommend that one. Others recommend booking a hotel much closer to the embassy instead (it was about a 15-20 minute cab ride from our hotel to the embassy), so it just depends on what works best for you and how you plan to travel to Stockholm.

Something to highlight, as this is something we had trouble with confirming beforehand and had to pretty much just try for ourselves and see - the American is NOT allowed into the embassy with the beneficiary. I was able to wait outside with Paul in line until he was called up to the security window, but then I had to leave. Because it was so cold, I couldn't wait outside for him and ended up having to take a cab back to the hotel to wait. For me, it was worth it to at least wait with him in line until he went in, but to each their own.

The interview was scheduled for 8:30 am, and they open at 8am. We left early enough to arrive at the embassy shortly after 7:30am, and we were first in line. If you read other reviews of the Stockholm embassy, you'll hear a lot about the two lines outside being confusing, which we found to be slightly true. The line for non-immigrant visas begins over by the outdoor vestibul (looks like a bus stop), and the immigrant visa line is just in front of it. The sign will say this line is for immigrant visa applicants and American citizens, and you line up along the sidewalk - this is where you need to be.

They called us up to the security window once they opened at 8am and asked Paul a couple of basic questions, asked to see his passport. This is all done through the window, they don't let you inside the security building yet. At this point, he asked who I was and we explained who I was and why I was there, also stated I was American. We asked if I could come inside to wait. The gentleman was very nice and at first said no, but did take the time to double check with some others inside before advising I was indeed unable to come in, so I left at this point.

At the security window (still outside), Paul was told to put his phone on airplane mode, or turn it off completely. He was told to remove his jacket and stand behind a yellow line and turn around so they could check his person. He also had to lift up both shoes so they could check the soles of his shoes. At this point, he was let inside the security building and went through something similar to an airport security check. All the items he had were put through a scanner and his phone was confiscated and placed in a locker, which they gave him a ticket for to retrieve once he left. This is all done in the security building out front.

Once this was done, he left the security building and was instructed to follow a yellow line through a parking lot to the actual embassy building. When he entered, there was a waiting area with a guard asking what he was there for. Once advising his business need, he went to a room full of chairs and spoke to a man at a window who also asked what he was doing there. Paul had to show this guy his passport. This gentleman advised him to go to the next window, where a woman (speaking English) asked him to speak Swedish. He complied and provided this lady his evidence. The lady mainly questioned the essential papers such as police records, divorce cree, and identification papers (Person Bevis). All papers were in English. She did not question original evidence and only asked to see more recent evidence, such as things that have occurred since initially applying for the visa. She explained this was not the actual interview, and asked mostly questions about the petitioner, such as what kind of work the petitioner does. The questions seemed more related to the petitioner's job/line of work. After she was done, she advised Paul to wait for his name to be called out. Personal assessment: it doesn't seem to be necessary to front load original evidence at this point, as they did not seem very interested in this and mostly in important papers (listed above).

After about ten minutes, he was called to the next window and spoke to a young American officer to complete the interview. Paul had to give his fingerprints and swear under oath. The officer asked if he read the IMBRA pamphlet (about beneficiary's rights). He then asked about how we met, and asked what the petitioner did for a living. He also asked what Paul did for a living and if he intended on continuing that profession in the US, which he does (he's a trained chef). He asked a lot of questions about the petitioner's job, what it entailed, etc. He advised Paul everything looked good, but because they had not yet received his medical papers from the doctor (Paul's medical was only the week before the interview), they couldn't issue the visa yet and had to wait until they receive those papers. (Based on our experience, it's best to try and plan your medical at least two weeks before your actual interview to avoid that lapse).

The interview was on a Thursday, Paul received his copy of the paperwork from the doctor the following Tuesday (which he was under the impression from the doctor that whenever he received the papers, the embassy had received theirs as well). The case was updated online that next Friday to Issued and he is currently waiting to receive the visa and his passport in the mail (he was advised it will arrive within 10 business days).

All in all, it was a very pleasant and non-stressful experience. Everyone we both encountered, both inside and outside the embassy, were very friendly and helpful.
Rating : Very Good


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*Notice about estimates: The estimates are based off averages of other members recent experiences
(documented in their timelines) for the same benefit/petition/application at the same filing location.
Individual results may vary as every case is not always 'average'. Past performance does not necessarily
predict future results. The 'as early as date' may change over time based on current reported processing
times from members. There have historically been cases where a benefit/petition/application processing
briefly slows down or stops and this can not be predicted. Use these dates as reference only and do not
rely on them for planning. As always you should check the USCIS processing times to see if your application
is past due.

** Not all cases are transfered

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