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Tourseasia

I-130 filing requirement

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According to the USCIS Field Office in Manila;

Current DCF procedures state that if a US Citizen lives overseas they may file the I-130 for a foreign spouse, child or parent at the US Consulate / USCIS Field Office governing their place of residence.

In most cases permanent residence abroad must be legally established for a period of six months prior to submitting an I-130 petition.

My question is when I file for the 13a [permanent residence] with the BI in manila and are granted a 1yr probation period for permanent residence, is the first 6 months count for the 6 month requirement, or does it have to be 6 months after the 1yr probation period is finished for filing the I-130?

Thanks :)

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USC must stay more than 6 mos here in the Philippines before you can file I-I30 at USEM.

Of course, you must be married also to qualify.

While you are staying here in the Phils., just keep all receipts or bills which will be serving as proofs of your stay here.

When I filed ACR card for my husband, we immediately filed for a petition.

I hope this helps.

According to the USCIS Field Office in Manila;

Current DCF procedures state that if a US Citizen lives overseas they may file the I-130 for a foreign spouse, child or parent at the US Consulate / USCIS Field Office governing their place of residence.

In most cases permanent residence abroad must be legally established for a period of six months prior to submitting an I-130 petition.

My question is when I file for the 13a [permanent residence] with the BI in manila and are granted a 1yr probation period for permanent residence, is the first 6 months count for the 6 month requirement, or does it have to be 6 months after the 1yr probation period is finished for filing the I-130?

Thanks :)


God is good all the time..

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According to the USCIS Field Office in Manila;

Current DCF procedures state that if a US Citizen lives overseas they may file the I-130 for a foreign spouse, child or parent at the US Consulate / USCIS Field Office governing their place of residence.

In most cases permanent residence abroad must be legally established for a period of six months prior to submitting an I-130 petition.

My question is when I file for the 13a [permanent residence] with the BI in manila and are granted a 1yr probation period for permanent residence, is the first 6 months count for the 6 month requirement, or does it have to be 6 months after the 1yr probation period is finished for filing the I-130?

Thanks :)

My question is, why go through all that hassle of obtaining residency in the Philippines when you can simply file at the lockbox facility assigned to your State of residency? The difference in processing time is only a month or so ahead if doing it on a DCF! If you add the 6 months it takes to be called a Philippine-resident, then you're wasting time.

I could have obtained a 13(a) visa when I got married there and wait the 6 months, but instead I filed for my spousal visa immediately after the wedding. I filed on May 19, 2012, got my I130 approval on 8/3/2012 and currently awaiting my NVC notice. By doing the DCF, I would have been still waiting for my PHL residency.

But your situation is different as you might have your own reason for doing it your way.

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My question is, why go through all that hassle of obtaining residency in the Philippines when you can simply file at the lockbox facility assigned to your State of residency? The difference in processing time is only a month or so ahead if doing it on a DCF! If you add the 6 months it takes to be called a Philippine-resident, then you're wasting time.

I could have obtained a 13(a) visa when I got married there and wait the 6 months, but instead I filed for my spousal visa immediately after the wedding. I filed on May 19, 2012, got my I130 approval on 8/3/2012 and currently awaiting my NVC notice. By doing the DCF, I would have been still waiting for my PHL residency.

But your situation is different as you might have your own reason for doing it your way.

So your saying your living in the Philippines full time and as soon as you were married filed an I-130 with the lockbox in Chicago Il. And they will send your papers to you in the Philippines? And when you file for the IR-1/CR-1 that will be thru the Chicago Lockbox as well? I thought you have to file where your currently residing at, I have been living here in the Philippines for many years on a tourist visa and just got married in May this year.

:)

Edited by Tourseasia

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So your saying your living in the Philippines full time and as soon as you were married filed an I-130 with the lockbox in Chicago Il. And they will send your papers to you in the Philippines? And when you file for the IR-1/CR-1 that will be thru the Chicago Lockbox as well? I thought you have to file where your currently residing at, I have been living here in the Philippines for many years on a tourist visa and just got married in May this year.

:)

I know it's somewhat confusing but here's the hows and whys:

1. I am a Fil-Am so I'm able to live in the Philippines on an annual Balikbayan tourist Visa. I get to stay in the Philippines for 11 mos and 29 days after which I have to exit the country and return after a weekend in Hongkong or any of the neighboring countries. When I return after a weekend, I'm good again for the next 11 mos and 29 days of the year.

2. The US Embassy would not allow me to file a DCF because I am not a permanent resident of the Philippines although I've been doing the in and outs for the last 7 year. Therefore I have to file with the Phoenix, AZ lockbox because my State of permanent residence is California.

3. I sent my I130 to the Phoenix lockbox with an explanation and it was accepted. I now get my mail via my FPO AP address here in the Philippines (being a retired US military). I had to explain to the USCIS that my home address is California, but my current mailing address is my FPO AP address in the Philippines.

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So your saying your living in the Philippines full time and as soon as you were married filed an I-130 with the lockbox in Chicago Il. And they will send your papers to you in the Philippines? And when you file for the IR-1/CR-1 that will be thru the Chicago Lockbox as well? I thought you have to file where your currently residing at, I have been living here in the Philippines for many years on a tourist visa and just got married in May this year.

:)

By the way, I got married April 19, 2012 and filed my I130 last May of 2012 also.

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