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We are about to schedule our interview in Havana and I have a few questions:

1. How reliable is the Cuban mail system to receive the packet? If a Cuban shows up at the embassy, can they pick it up?

2. Does the Petitioner have to come to the interview? How did you other Americans schedule your timing? I want to be with him when he says good bye to his family, but I also want to be there for the interview. If I have to choose one event, I am going to escort him to the U.S. I don't want to have to wait a week or more for the visa as I cannot take off work that long. For those of you that didn't go to the interview, did you have to call in to the embassy? How many of you left with a visa in hand, versus having to wait 1+ weeks?

3. Did the Cuban beneficiary have to bring the I-134 to the interview?

4. Are there computers in the embassy that the beneficiaries can use to review and print the confirmation page of the DS160 that we fill out for them in the U.S.?

5. All of the visa paperwork/process is to adhere to the requirements of the U.S. government. Is there anything a Cuban needs to do to on their side to leave the country? I am nervous that we get through all the U.S. stuff, get to the airport, and for some reason he cannot leave because we needed to fill out a form of some sort! Help?

6. For those of you with your love already by your side, how is the Cuban liking America? I know my fiance will love Los Angeles, but I am curious what he will think of the culture shock.

Thank you all for the help and advice.

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Hi there!!

Cuba it's a totally different "thing" The good part. the embassy knows.
the mail it's not reliable at all. maybe only in Havana. you don't have to be at interview however If you have to choose between the interview and the trip, go to the interview. His trip should be very easy especially if his point of entry is Miami ( there's about 2 millions Cubans in Miami) (I'm one of those) There's not computers at the embassy for public use. he needs to go find out the way to do it. believe me every Cuban knows that they need to ask a friend.
He will need a couple of things from the Cuban authorities but they will tell him at the department of immigration of his community.
About the culture shock... of course any chance it might be a little difficult at the beginning but it's not as hard as it use to be when my family came in the early 60's. besides... Love will find a way :-)
I'm not aware about how's the current situation for the rest of your questions, but around the embassy he will find a group of people that are experts on every situation (that's what they do for a living) and operate from their houses.
Good luck :-))

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Here is a wiki page with some Cuba-specific K-1 information. But make sure to check everything as some of the information may be outdated (page was created in 2013 although some people may have made changes to it since then.)

http://www.visajourney.com/wiki/index.php/Cuba_K1#Frequently_Asked_Questions_Specific_to_Cuba

To answer your questions:

1. Mail is unreliable in Cuba. Your fiancé can make an appointment to pick up the packet by calling US Embassy there.

2. Like the person before said, if you have the choice of being there for the interview or escorting your fiancé to the US, GO TO THE INTERVIEW. While it is not mandatory that you be there, it helps a lot especially if there is even the slightest possibility that they might think your relationship is not valid (length of relationship, big age difference, have only met each other in person a couple of times, etc...) Also, they do not issue visas immediately. It can take a week or even longer for the visa to be ready. Many here have had to go through administrative processing, which can take months to clear.

3. Yes, the Cuban beneficiary has to bring the I-134 to the interview. The wiki page lists everything you will need for the interview-- although again, double check to make sure the list is still current.

4. I do not know.

5. I do not know as the process has changed since my now husband left. But yes, he should check with his local immigration office to find out. Also, depending on his profession, he may need to ask permission to leave his job (like if he were a doctor.)

6. Everyone's experience is different. But I can tell you that the first year can be difficult, especially if he does not know the language. Also know that he will not be able to work for the first 6 months or more depending on when you marry and file for AOS + AP/EAD combo card.

Good luck!


N-400

06/18/2016 Mailed N-400 application

06/21/2016 NOA

07/22/2016 Biometrics

08/26/2016 In line for interview

10/24/2016 Interview (approved)

11/16/2016 Oath ceremony

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Thank you all so much!!! I did learn there is an IRC at the embassy where you can make appointments to use their computers!

My fiancé was saying he prefers that I come to bring him to the U.S. and help him through the "goodbyes" and navigating through the airport. I'm just so torn because it's difficult to get flights to and from Cuba, and given the embargo it's not easy to travel there. Plus I live in LA, so there's a lot of money and time spent even just getting to Miami.

So for those of you who say to go to the interview, do you recommend I just meet him in he Miami airport? I'm so stressed about this decision!!!! Thank you all for being my sounding board.

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Inlovewithacuban-

I am in the same boat as you. I am torn between interview and departure. I am going for the departure because he doesn't speak english and I am afraid he will need the guidance through the whole process and I need to think about all the things he will be bringing with him so I will take luggage.

I chose not to go to the interview for a few reasons- some from speaking with other people on here.. They feel if they didn't go to the interview their visa would have A - been approved and B - not been put into AP for 2-3 months.

Try to find these stories on here to make a sound decision and go with your gut.

I talked to someone else on here who said she had a lawyer do the DS form for the finance for a small fee.

They are not easy as the consulate by any means - I know a year ago there was a woman officer who was denying people left and right. Thank god she isn't there any longer.

Best of luck -

You can also find people who will take the forms to your fiancé for the interview.

There is an embargo but you can still go. I've been 5 times in two years and might have to go back just to drop off papers since I don't know how else to get him what he needs to take to the interview.

Dealing with Cuba is a lot more difficult than other countries because the lack of internet to the Cuban's and the lack of mail system.


2nd go round

1st K-1 Denied

Subitted Feb 2-6-15

NOA1 - 2-18-15

NOA2 - 8-18-15

Interview 11-25-15 - Denied

And Here we go again -

New K1 submitted - 1-9-16

NOA1 - 1-12-16 (according to USCIS)

Text received 1-15-16

hardcopy - not received yet as of 1-26-16

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I went to visit my husband about a month before his case was approved. We did not think it would be approved so quickly. I wasn't able to go to his interview because I live in Chicago and I wasn't able to get off work, or pay to return in Cuba for his interview. He had to do the interview and the entry alone. He was a little nervous, but it all went smoothly. Luckily he came through Miami and there are so many Cuban coming into the port of entry there that he felt pretty comfortable. He had to navigate the miami airport and get on a flight to Chicago alone without a cell phone. I will admit I was extremely worried, but everything went well. I hope everything goes smoothly for your fiance as well! :)

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5. All of the visa paperwork/process is to adhere to the requirements of the U.S. government. Is there anything a Cuban needs to do to on their side to leave the country? I am nervous that we get through all the U.S. stuff, get to the airport, and for some reason he cannot leave because we needed to fill out a form of some sort! Help?

I am somewhat knowledgeable of the new immigration reforms implemented by the Cuban government in early 2013. Here are a few things to note:

- Cubans no longer need the "exit permit" or "carta blanca."

- As someone mentioned above, certain professionals that represent "the qualified workforce for the economic, social and scientific development of the country"--- these range anywhere from star athletes to medical doctors--- must first request "authorization to reside abroad" ("permiso para residir en el exterior") to superiors in their respective fields (a request that no doubt must be approved by the Comisión de Cuadros, a workforce management agency). This permission must be obtained before even applying for a passport, as is the case with the next point, that is, military service.

- You husband must not be legible for compulsory military service. First he must either fulfill the military service requirement or request a waiver to the Cuban Revolutionary Armed Forces (FAR). This latter option is seldom granted.

- If he owns any property in Cuba in which he is still interested, he may keep it under current regulations. This was not the case years ago.

I hope this helps,

R.R.

Edited by RockyRaccoon

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Is it even possible for the petitioner to attend to the interview with the beneficiary??? While I was applying for the K1 visa, I read in a bunch of different places that it was not allowed, but I've seen come cases here on VJ where the petitioner attended the interview as well. Maybe it is different for other countries, but I don't think the petitioner is allowed in the interview as far as Cuba goes.

Edit: I would not rely on the mail system even in Havana where things work better. My fiancée (at the time, currently my wife) actually never received the famous packet from the embassy. Luckily we knew everything we needed to get done and were ready for the interview by the time that came around. And yes, take the affidavit to the interview please. Also, regarding him adjusting to things here in the US, it's different depending on the person's personality and where they move to. I've known people (Cubans) that come to Miami where a Cuban can feel more at home outside of Cuba than any other place, and they have a really hard time adjusting and go through depression etc. However, those cases are rare. For the most part, Cubans will be happy anywhere but IN CUBA! L.A. is a different case though, it will be up to him to get used to it and encourage him to learn English. Doesn't have to be perfect but it will make him feel more independent.

Best of luck to you both.

Edited by Guille89

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Thank you all so much!!! I did learn there is an IRC at the embassy where you can make appointments to use their computers!

My fiancé was saying he prefers that I come to bring him to the U.S. and help him through the "goodbyes" and navigating through the airport. I'm just so torn because it's difficult to get flights to and from Cuba, and given the embargo it's not easy to travel there. Plus I live in LA, so there's a lot of money and time spent even just getting to Miami.

So for those of you who say to go to the interview, do you recommend I just meet him in he Miami airport? I'm so stressed about this decision!!!! Thank you all for being my sounding board.

I just wanted to let you know direct flights btwn LAX and HAV are supposed to begin in December so depending on where you are in the process, your fiance may be able to bypass Miami.


N-400

06/18/2016 Mailed N-400 application

06/21/2016 NOA

07/22/2016 Biometrics

08/26/2016 In line for interview

10/24/2016 Interview (approved)

11/16/2016 Oath ceremony

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