Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
mrsbetz

I-864 Qs Unanswered

4 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi, I'm looking ahead at the second part of the application process, and although I've read through all of the London embassy's info on the I-864, I am still sort of confused. I haven't lived in the US for almost five years, so, I'm going to have to prove that I "intend" to take up residence in the US again. I'm looking thru the suggestions, and I don't really know how I'm going to do it.

http://london.usembassy.gov/cons_new/faqs/...4_domicile.html

You may meet this requirement by showing that you have taken or will take a credible combination of steps to make the U.S. your immediate principal place of residence. Such steps may include finding employment, locating a place to live, registering children in U.S. schools etc. In addition, you should make arrangements to abandon your residence in the United Kingdom; for example obtaining a valuation of your property from an estate agent.

Okay, I'm a stay-at-home mom to a 4 mo. old little boy. I have no intention of going back to work for a while when we move there. My mom suggested that she could "make up" a role for me within her business, but I don't feel right about it, and I don't think I could get away with it anyway. Because of his age, I obviously can't enroll him in school, and I'm not putting him in daycare. Also, we weren't planning on going house/apartment hunting until we were there--my sister and her husband were going to let us stay with them for a few weeks. Abandoning our residence here isn't a problem though, we can just get out of our lease early.

Are there some other things I can do to prove that I intend on moving back?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there! Are you sure you're doing K3? Just asking because if you're resident in the UK you should have filed directly through the Embassy (the so-called DCF process).

London is fairly relaxed on the domicile issue; I hadn't lived in the US for 12 years and had pretty much abandoned domicile (no bank account, no drivers licence, no credit card, zilch, zip, nada!) and I still made it through with no problems. No one is expecting you to get a job or put your baby in day care, but there are some very simple steps you can take to compile a "domicile dossier".

Do you still have a US bank account? If you do, get a hold of your most recent statements. Ditto for US credit cards.

If you have a US driving licence, keep it up to date and bring it with you.

Do you still have any mail being delivered to you in America? If not, consider getting something mailed to you in advance at your temporary residence with your sister.

Are you still on the electoral rolls somewhere in the US? It may be possible to obtain proof of this from your registrar of voters.

Consider writing a letter to the Embassy to take with you on the day that spells out what steps you will be taking to abandon UK residency -- like how easily you can get out of your lease, winding up bills, etc. I did this and spelled out how I had resigned my job contingent on getting the visa, where I was going to stay in the US and what our living arrangements were.

All you need to show for London is that you are taking steps to establish residency not later than the date which your husband enters. As I said, London is pragmatic about this and are willing to listen to your circumstances. Good luck! :thumbs:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, you're absolutely right, I'm doing DCF. Technically, I've been "domiciled" at my parents' home since I moved as I've had my mail sent there, and that is the address on my DL. Also, thank-goodness I have a US account for the sole purpose of paying off my student loans. If I were majorly lazy, I would list my parents' house as my residence in the US, but, we aren't going to stay there really, and my sister is going to be my joint sponsor.

Anyway, thanks for the info, you're a star!

Betsy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×
×
  • Create New...