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Found 10 results

  1. I live in the UK and do not have a US cosigner. This means that I can only get a loan from 2 companies. There's MPower and one other, but they both have their own lists of specific universities that they support. I can only get an MPower loan of $50'000, and that's a lifetime maximum amount. The other uni doesn't offer loans for my course. I'm about $20'000 short of being able to prove to the Embassy that I can afford the whole year of my course, but without a cosigner I can't apply for any of the other student loans. I'm not sure what else to do now. Does anyone have any advice? Also, does anyone know if a death certificate would help to prove to the Embassy that my family will be receiving inheritance? Thanks x
  2. I (US Citizen) filed an I-130 for my wife (Indian Citizen) that was received by USCIS on December 2, 2019. Since then she has received an opportunity at a US University for a fully funded PhD program that is exactly in the scope of her previous education (Bachelor's / Master's completed in India). The professor she would be working under has said she is the only suitable candidate they have identified for the position. I am currently a graduate student in Ohio and her PhD program would take place in Mississippi. Acceptance into this program would be huge for both of our future due to timeline and credibility of US university on her resume. The program would last a minimum of 3 years. Presumably her I-130 would be processed and she would receive her green card well before the end of the program. I know it is more difficult to receive an F1 visa if you have any sort of immigrant visa pending. I have two questions regarding this: 1. This seems like a unique circumstance that could affect her F1 chances. Seemingly it would be impossible for her to overstay her F1 visa seeing as her spouse visa will have been approved by the time her F1 expires. Are the chances of her receiving the F1 non-zero? 2. Would the filing of an I-20 and an attempt to receive the F1 visa hinder her I-130 process in any way? Thank you for your time and any advice you can provide.
  3. Hello all, I am a green card holder and I have filed I130 for my spouse and the process is going on to bring her here through family based immigration as my dependent. While this process is going on can she apply for tourist visa or student visa with full disclosure of her pending I130? ANy one here who went that route and had any luck? Please share your experience and any advice or tips? Thanks in advance. Regards, J
  4. I entered the US with a F-1 visa on September of 2019 and I originally came for a graduate program. Classes started last Fall and the school had a quarter system. After completing the first quarter there, I decided to transfer to an undergraduate program at a new school, which has a semester based system. I got my I-20 transferred between the two schools and started at the new school in January of 2020. I just found out that there's not going to be enough classes available for me to enroll full time next semester (summer) and my advisor said it's ok for me to take the summer semester off and go back to school next fall. The problem is this school doesn't have a lot of experience with international students, which makes me feel a little insecure about his advising. I know I'm allowed to take an annual vacation after completing an academic year, but does the quarter term I completed at the previous school count towards this time? And can I stay in the US during the break or do I have to go back to my home country until fall? Also, to make it a little more complicated, I have tickets booked to visit my home country for 2 weeks in May. I bought them before I knew I was not going to be taking classes over the summer. Do you think I'll have issues re-entering the US?
  5. Hi everyone!! I was just wondering if anyone had any experience with a K1 interview after having F1 (student visa/s) denied? I have had a couple of J visas approved and worked as a camp counsellor (where I met my fiance) in 2014 2015 and 2016, and was an Au Pair in his city for 18 months. Then in December 2018 I applied for a student visa and was denied under 214(b). I reapplied a few weeks later and took more evidence with me but unfortunately was denied again for the same reason 214(b) for lack of home ties. We have now been doing long distance for over a year and have just applied for our K1 visa. We have been dating for 4 years and have tons and tons of evidence of trips, with each others family etc, but we are nervous if at the interview I am asked about my prior student visa denials. Has anyone had any experience with this and if so, what were you asked during the interview and was it an issue for you? Thank you!!!
  6. Overview Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. You must have a student visa to study in the United States. Your course of study and the type of school you plan to attend determine whether you need an F visa or an M visa. To enter the United States to attend: You need the following visa category: University or college F High School Private elementary school Seminary Conservatory Another academic institution, including a language training program Vocational or other recognized nonacademic institution, other than a language training program M Students cannot travel on the Visa Waiver Program or with Visitor Visas A student visa (F or M) is required to study in the United States. Foreign nationals may not study after entering on a visitor (B) visa or through the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), except to undertake recreational study (non-credit) as part of a tourist visit. For more information on the VWP, see Visa Waiver Program. For short periods of recreational study, a Visitor (B) visa may be appropriate A visitor (B) visa permits enrollment in a short recreational course of study, which is not for credit toward a degree or academic certificate. Learn more about Visitor Visas. Study leading to a U.S. conferred degree or certificate is never permitted on a visitor (B) visa, even if it is for a short duration. For example, a student in a distance learning program that requires a period of time on the institution’s U.S. campus must obtain a student (F or M) visa prior to entering the United States. Student Acceptance at a SEVP Approved School The first step is to apply to a SEVP-approved school in the United States. After the SEVP-approved school accepts your enrollment, you will be registered for the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and must pay the SEVIS I-901 fee. The SEVP-approved school will issue you a Form I-20. After you receive the Form I-20 and register in SEVIS, you may apply at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate for a student (F or M) visa. You must present the Form I-20 to the consular officer when you attend your visa interview. If your spouse and/or children intend to live with you in the United States while you study, they must also enroll in SEVIS, obtain individual Form I-20s from the SEVP-approved school, and apply for a visa (but they do not pay the SEVIS fee). Visit the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) website to learn more about SEVIS and the SEVIS I-901 Fee. Visit the Department of State EducationUSA website to learn about educational opportunities for undergraduate and graduate study, and an overview of the application process. You can also visit the DHS Study in the States school search page to search for SEVP-certified schools. How To Apply There are several steps to apply for a visa. The order of these steps and how you complete them may vary by U.S. Embassy or Consulate. Please consult the instructions on the embassy or consulate website. Complete the Online Visa Application Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application, Form DS-160 – Learn more about completing the DS-160. You must: 1) complete the online visa application, and 2) print the application form confirmation page to bring to your interview. Photo –You will upload your photo while completing the online Form DS-160. Your photo must be in the format explained in the Photograph Requirements. Schedule an Interview Interviews are generally required for visa applicants with certain limited exceptions below. Consular officers may require an interview of any visa applicant. If you are age: Then an interview is: 13 and younger Generally not required 14 - 79 Required (some exceptions for renewals) 80 and older Generally not required You should schedule an appointment for your visa interview at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the country where you live. You may schedule your interview at another U.S. Embassy or Consulate, but be aware that it may be more difficult to qualify for a visa outside of the country where you live. Wait times for interview appointments vary by location, season, and visa category, so you should apply for your visa early. Review the interview wait time for the location where you will apply: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/visa-information-resources/wait-times.html New Students – Student (F and M) visas for new students can be issued up to 120 days in advance of the start date for a course of study. However, you will not be allowed to enter the United States on your student visa more than 30 days before the start date. Continuing Students - Student (F and M) visas for continuing students may be issued at any time, as long as the student is currently enrolled at a SEVP-approved school or institution and in SEVIS. Continuing students may enter the United States at any time before classes start. Prepare for Your Interview Fees - Pay the non-refundable visa application fee, if you are required to pay it before your interview. If your visa is approved, you may also pay a visa issuance fee, if applicable to your nationality. Fee information is provided here: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/visa-information-resources/fees/fees-visa-services.html Review the instructions available on the website of the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you will apply to learn more about fee payment. Gather Required Documentation Gather and prepare the following required documents before your visa interview: Passport valid for travel to the United States – Your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your period of stay in the United States (unless exempt by country-specific agreements). Each individual who needs a visa must submit a separate application, including any family members listed in your passport. Nonimmigrant Visa Application, Form DS-160 confirmation page. Application fee payment receipt, if you are required to pay before your interview. Photo – You will upload your photo while completing the online Form DS-160. If the photo upload fails, you must bring one printed photo in the format explained in the Photograph Requirements. Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1) Student Status-For Academic and Language Students, Form I-20 or Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (M-1) Student Status for Vocational Students, Form I-20 – Your school will send you a Form I-20 once they have entered your information in the SEVIS database. You and your school official must sign the Form I-20. All students must be registered in the Student and Exchange Visitor System (SEVIS). Your spouse and/or minor children, if they intend live in the United States with you, will each receive an individual Form I-20. Additional Documentation May Be Required A consular officer will interview you to determine your qualifications for a student visa, and may request additional documents, such as evidence of: Your academic preparation, such as: Transcripts, diplomas, degrees, or certificates from schools you attended; and Standardized test scores required by your U.S. school; Your intent to depart the United States upon completion of the course of study; and How you will pay all educational, living and travel costs. Review the instructions for how to apply for a visa on the website of the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you will apply. Attend Your Visa Interview A consular officer will interview you to determine whether you are qualified to receive a student visa. You must establish that you meet the requirements under U.S. law to receive a visa. Ink-free, digital fingerprint scans are taken as part of the application process. They are usually taken during your interview, but this varies based on location. After your visa interview, the consular officer may determine that your application requires further administrative processing. The consular officer will inform you if this is required. After the visa is approved, you may need to pay a visa issuance fee (if applicable to your nationality), and make arrangements for the return of the passport and visa to you. Review the visa processing times to learn more. Entering the United States A visa does not guarantee entry into the United States. A visa only allows a foreign citizen to travel to a U.S. port-of-entry (generally an airport) and request permission to enter the United States. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials at the port-of-entry have authority to permit or deny admission to the United States. After you present your passport, visa, and Form I-20 at the port-of-entry, a CBP official will make this decision. Once you are allowed to enter the United States, the CBP official will provide an admission stamp or paper Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record. Learn about procedures for students (with F or M visas) entering the United States on the CBP website under Arrival Procedures for Students or Exchange Visitors. Learn about admissions and entry requirements, restrictions about bringing food, agricultural products, and other restricted/prohibited goods, and more by reviewing the CBP website. Extending Your Stay Foreign students in the United States with F visas must depart the United States within 60 days after the program end date listed on Form I-20, including any authorized practical training. Foreign students may request an extension through U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website (see the USCIS Extend Your Stay page). Additional information to maintain student status is on the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement SEVP website under Maintaining Your Immigration Status While a Student or Exchange Visitor. Failure to depart the United States on time will result in being out of status. Under U.S. law, visas of individuals who are out of status are automatically voided (Section 222(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act). Any multiple entry visa that was voided due to being out of status will not be valid for future entries into the United States. Failure to depart the United States on time may also result in you being ineligible for visas in the future. Review Visa Denials and Ineligibilities and Waivers: Laws to learn more. Change of Status If your plans change while in the United States (for example, you marry a U.S. citizen or receive an offer of employment), you may be able to request a change in your nonimmigrant status to another category through U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). See Change My Nonimmigrant Status on the USCIS website to learn more. While you are in the United States, receiving a change of status from USCIS does not require you to apply for a new visa. However, once you depart the United States you must apply for a new visa at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate in the appropriate category for your travel. Additional Information There is no guarantee you will be issued a visa. Do not make final travel plans or buy tickets until you have a visa. For information about working in the United States during your study, review Students and Employment and Form I-765 Work Authorization Instructions on the USCIS website. If you have a temporary break in your study, view the information on the SEVP website under Do Students Returning from Temporary Absences Need New Visas? If your student visa is still valid, but you are outside the United States, you should consult with your Designated School Officials. Spouse and children Your spouse and unmarried, minor children who intend to reside with you during your study may apply for F-2 or M-2 visas. Although SEVIS fee payment is not required, your school must issue them an individual Form I-20, which is required to apply for their visas. You must provide a copy of your F-1 or M-1 visa and provide proof of relationship. Your minor children are permitted to attend school in the United States while accompanying you. U.S. Embassies and Consulates will adjudicate visa applications that are based on a same-sex marriage in the same way that we adjudicate applications for opposite gender spouses. A valid U.S. visa in an expired passport is still valid. Unless canceled or revoked, a visa is valid until its expiration date. If you have a valid visa in your expired passport, do not remove it from your expired passport. You may use your valid visa in your expired passport along with a new valid passport for travel and admission to the United States.
  7. Hello, I'm an American citizen living in South Korea. I have been living here for 4 years. I got married four months ago to my wife who is Korean. We are planning to move to the U.S. in Fall of 2020 so she can attend graduate school. She has a master's degree in English Language Instruction, but will be pursuing a degree in a different field. She will be a full time student and likely won't work while studying. I have not lived in the U.S. for 4 years, and I have never lived in the state where we hope to move for school. We don't know our plans after she graduates, we will likely move back to Korea, but there is the possibility we may want to stay in the U.S. after graduation. Is a CR1 visa the obvious option for us? Or would an F1 visa also be suitable for our situation? If we applied for a CR1 visa and ended up moving back to Korea for several years after graduation would the visa be canceled? Would being a married couple on an F1 visa cause any foreseeable problems? Thanks for your help!
  8. My fiance is French, but he lived in China with his parents for several years with a student visa from the time he was 10 years old until he was 19 years old. He moved back to China when he was 21 years old with a visitor visa (S2) to visit family and he has been living in china for 2 years (including the multiple renewals). Do you know if he is required to get documentation for a criminal background check from china even though he is not a Chinese citizen and has been on a visitor and student visa all these years? If a criminal background check from China is required, where do you recommend to go? He lives in Shanghai. Thanks!!
  9. Hello, A friend of mine is here in the U.S. on a student visa. She would like to get married to a guy, who is a U.S. citizen. Her student visa expires in October 2019. 1) What steps does she need to take after she gets married to stay in the U.S.? 2) If she’s already married can she stay in the U.S. even if her student visa expires? Thank you for your assistance in advance!!
  10. i am a former J1 student visa holder, my program ended on October 29 2018 and thats where i met my fiance. i went back home to the Philippines after my program to graduate. my fiance visited me in the Philippines 3 months later and that when he proposed and when we decided to apply for a K1 Fiance Visa. would my previous student visa affect the visa we currently are applying for? My J1 visa is not subject to the Two-year home country requirement, but we did not declare it on our petition packet.
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