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KayDeeCee

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  1. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from YvetteS in Immunizations. DS-3025 or I-693?   
    Thank you for writing out a new post about all of this. Going to ask that this is pinned(even though no one seems to read pinned threads either) so it can be referred to from now on.
  2. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from fuzxzmjer in K1 and health insurance   
    The guides here on VJ are based on FACTS and the INSTRUCTIONS from the USCIS forms. They are not full of opinions and I am not sure I follow the "rally in support of individuals" as far as the guides are concerned. That particular link is a guide to obtaining your SSN, and includes a document from the SSA, not some member's opinion. The other guides here list the forms from the USCIS and the guides are based on the instructions given by the USCIS. It is always advised to seek out the most current forms, fees and instructions from the USCIS website. Many people get through the immigration process with no problems just by following these guides and the USCIS and country consulate specific instructions without ever consulting an attorney, including myself. A lot of times I have seen the non-professional, experienced members here on VJ give better and more accurate advice than had been given by lawyers.
  3. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Nikol993 in SSN Married Name Change- K1   
    You should be able to change it with just the marriage certificate, but quite a few have run into problems trying to get their SSN in their married name before they have govt. ID in the married name first.
    You do not need it changed to file for AOS. List your SSN on the forms where it asks, and put your maiden name when asks for maiden or other names used. Once you get the EAD/AP in your married name, then go change your SSN, or you could wait for the green card and get the name changed and get the SS card without the 'DHS authorization' notation on it.
    ~ Moved from Working & Traveling to Social Security Numbers - topic about SSN ~
  4. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Dhilman2 in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  5. Thanks
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Pumkinpie00 in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  6. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Teacake in I-864 Co sponsor   
    This is not so in all cases. Living in the same house does not determine if someone must file the I-864 or I-864A. They have no income, so it is best for the father to fill out his own separate I-864 instead. The I-864A is only used to combine incomes to reach the 125% requirement. If there is no income on the part of the primary sponsor, then it makes little sense to use a form to combine an income with nothing. The father should fill out his own separate I-864, like the attorney suggested.
  7. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Teacake in I-864 Co sponsor   
    You fill out the I-864 as the primary sponsor. Your father fills out his own I-864. Filling out an I-864A is used to combine incomes of qualifying household members. Since you are not earning anything, there is nothing to combine, so he would just use the I-864. Whether or not he needs to claim you in his household size is based on whether or not he claims you as a dependent on his taxes. If he does, then he counts you. If he doesn't, then he does not count you. His household size will be himself, a spouse if he has one, any dependent children under 21, any other dependents claimed on his taxes, anyone else he previously signed an affidavit of support for, plus your spouse(the intending immigrant).
  8. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from ParVJNu in What do the asterisk(*) below my photo on my visa mean?   
    This makes sense. B1 is a visitor visa. If she had all her belongings with her, then it appeared to CBP that she did not plan on just visiting. Why would someone need all their belongings just to visit temporarily?
  9. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from jporron in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  10. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Gloom in Joint sponsor on form I-134 (Affidavit of Support)   
  11. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Hemutian in AOS proof of relationship - just pictures   
    Not sure how many AOS threads you have actually read, but many people follow the I-485 instructions and do not send in any proof of relationship with their AOS submissions. The only proof of your relationship that is required is a copy of your marriage certificate. This topic of what is needed for AOS has also been discussed plenty of times. The I-485 instructions do not ask for any proof of relationship. Read through them.
    I don't have a blog, but can tell you that my husband and I never provided any proof of our marriage beyond the copy of our marriage certificate, and that was with having an AOS interview.
    Lots of those adjusting from a K-1 get approved without an RFE or interview, and they do not send in anything extra. Just what is required works. If you get an interview, then take whatever documentation you have to show co-mingling of finances and co-habitation. The IO may or may not ask for it. Most interviews for K-1 adjusters seem to be fairly quick, relaxed and easy. An IO understands the fact that you just got married recently and would not have a large paper trail documenting your marriage together yet.
    For ROC, the large paper trail is very much needed, so save up your evidence for that over the next couple years.
  12. Thanks
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from SunnyFireflies in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  13. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Teacake in SSN After Marriage K1   
    Ugh, yet another idiot SSA worker. They know NOTHING about immigration and should stop trying to advise on anything immigration related. They need to focus on learning their own SS jobs.
    As a K-1 entrant, you are legal alien allowed to work and therefore eligible for an SSN right after entry. You can use the I-94 up until it has 2 weeks left before it expires. To avoid hassles and delays, it is suggested to apply for the SSN in your maiden name so it matches the name on your I-94, passport and visa. You can apply in your maiden name even if you already married. Then apply for AOS in your married name, and go back and change the name on the SSN when you receive the EAD in your married name.
    You can NEVER change into a K-3 from a K-1. Getting married does NOT make you ineligible to receive an SSN using your I-94 as a K-1 entrant. You can print out the SSA's own info about a K-1 being a legal alien allowed to work, found in the guide > http://www.visajourney.com/content/ssn
    ~ Moved from K-1 Process to Social Security Numbers - topic about SSN~
  14. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Papa Mio 510 in received my I-797 now what?   
    The I-797c is the receipt notice. (NOA1). The approval notice(NOA2) will be an I-797.
    https://www.uscis.gov/i-797-info
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov...ons-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently they are all being sent to California (CSC).
    Flowchart > http://www.visajourney.com/content/k1flow
  15. Thanks
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from jeanieCZ in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  16. Thanks
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from K@S in SSN after AOS   
    Filing for AOS does not stop someone from being able to apply for their SSN. If they have at least 2 weeks left before their I-94 expires, then they can apply for the SSN, whether they have married yet or not, and whether they have filed for AOS yet or not. If the I-94 does not have enough time left on it, then they will need to wait for their EAD.
  17. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from vonsoriano in K2 "aging out" question (split thread)   
    The USCIS has not updated their sites and information, but there indeed was a BIA ruling years ago. The K-2 does not 'age-out'. File for the K-2 AOS at the same time as the K-1. No I-130 needed. Include a copy of the Matter of Le BIA ruling and point out that the K-2 is still eligible to AOS, even though they turned 21. This may help if whatever adjudicator happens to receive your case is not aware of the old ruling that USCIS is not updating about.
    The BIA ruling in 2011, Matter of Le > http://www.legalactioncenter.org/sites/default/files/docs/lac/Matter-of-Le-Decision-6-23-2011.pdf


    As long as a K-2 entered the US before turning 21 and the K-1 parent married the I-129F petitioner within 90 days of entry, then they are eligible for AOS and do not age out.

    A K-2 does not need to be under 18 when the K-1 parent's marriage takes place. The K-2 just has to receive the K-2 visa and enter the US with it before turning 21, and the K-1 parent must marry within 90 days of enter with their K-1. That is all it takes for a K-2 to be eligible to adjust status.

    USCIS Q&A from 2012. The USCIS is slow in providing updated info and guidance on new laws/rulings, but at least it was mentioned here > http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Outreach/Notes%20from%20Previous%20Engagements/2012/October%202012/AILA-Liaison-Committee-meetingQA.pdf

    You can find several articles and lawyer sites discussing the ruling if you Google something like "K-2 age out'.
    And this is from 2015 and proves that USCIS is slower than a weighted down turtle traveling through a molasses ridden tar pit. They have drafted the guidance, but the internal review is lasting for years. What a load of lazy BS >
    https://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Outreach/Notes%20from%20Previous%20Engagements/PED-Field_Ops_Agenda_October_2015_Cleared.pdf

    K-1 Matter of Sesay and Matter of Le Guidance
    7) During our liaison meeting on March 21, 2012, USCIS stated that it had drafted guidance related to Matter of Sesay, 25 I&N Dec. 431 (BIA 2011) and Matter of Le, 25 I&N Dec. 541 (BIA 2011) and that the guidance would be issued soon after the completion of an internal review.8 Please provide an update on the status this guidance.

    USCIS Response: USCIS has draft guidance related to Matter of Le and Matter of Sesay. This guidance is currently undergoing internal review.
  18. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Promiseiliya in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  19. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from mety in Form Expiration Dates Do NOT Matter. Pay Attention to the EDITION Dates.   
    People ask about form expiration dates all the time. The expiration date at the top of a form does not mean that form can no longer be used.
    The OMB(Office of Management and Budget) expiration date only matters internally for the USCIS. That expiration date has nothing to do with whether or not it will be acceptable for you to use. The edition date is what matters. The accepted edition dates for the forms are listed on the site where the forms can be found and downloaded. If you click on 'Edition Date', the information about that particular form's edition date, and what forms are accepted are listed there.
    Read more about it here > § 0.408 OMB control numbers and expiration dates assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995.
    A list of updated forms can be found on the USCIS website > https://www.uscis.gov/forms-updates
  20. Thanks
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Tin S. in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  21. Thanks
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from Ninja Joe in Birth certificate translation   
    Anyone fluent in both languages can do the translation. Just have the person use this certification on the translated document > http://www.visajourney.com/content/translations
  22. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from AudiS4 in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  23. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from ScooterJones in Process for the Mailing and Receiving of I-129F Petitions   
    This is asked about time and time again. The instructions state to mail the I-129F petition to the Dallas Lockbox facility, but people are still often confused about where to mail it, where it goes, and where it gets processed.
    The Dallas Lockbox is an intake facility. It is not a USCIS service center. They do not process and adjudicate the petitions there.
    The address for regular mail is a Dallas address and the address for courier mail is a Lewisville address. They are still both being sent to the Dallas Lockbox. The difference in addresses is just because the Dallas PO Box address cannot accept courier mail.
    This is exactly what happens when your petition is received at the Dallas Lockbox > http://www.uscis.gov/about-us/directorates-and-program-offices/lockbox-intake/lockbox-intake-processing-questions-and-answers
    The Lockbox Service provider performs the following activities when processing incoming applications:
    Receive, open, sort and stage mail. Prepare and scan documents. Enter document data in system from scanned images. Accept or reject applications and related fees based on business rules. Balance applications and fees. Deposit payments to the U.S. Treasury Send receipt notices for accepted applications to the applicant and designated representative. Return rejected applications to the applicant or designated representative. Transmit application data to USCIS and payment data to U.S. Department of Treasury. Send application files to the appropriate USCIS service center or field office for further processing. Once your petition is received and dealt with by the Lockbox facility, it will be sent to one of the USCIS service centers to be adjudicated. This is not a transfer of your case. Transfers only happen between one service center and another. If your petition was to be transferred, then you would receive a transfer notice stating such. Don't enter a transfer into your VJ timeline unless you actually receive a transfer notice, which is something entirely separate/different from your NOA1 receipt notice of filing.
    Your receipt notice (NOA1) will contain your receipt number and the service center location that your petition was sent to. Currently there are only two service centers processing the I-129F petitions. They are California (CSC) and Texas (TSC). If your receipt number begins with WAC, then your petition is at the CSC. If your receipt number begins with SRC then your petition is at the TSC.
    Typically the petitions are sent to one of the two service centers based on where the USC petitioner resides. I have seen some report that is not always 100% the case, but for the most part this is correct.
    California Service Center: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
    Texas Service Center: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, U.S. Virgin Islands, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.
  24. Thanks
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from peanutismint in Form I-693 with K1 visa   
    The actual I-693 instructions state you do not need another medical if you had yours overseas within a year of filing for AOS. This gets asked about a lot here on VJ. You can do a search here to find more threads about the topic. Also, there is an AOS forum too: http://www.visajourney.com/forums/forum/7-adjustment-of-status-green-card-from-family-based-visas/
    You do not need a medical, and you may not need to see a civil surgeon at all. If you had all the required vaccinations at the time of your medical and they are all marked off on your DS-3025, then skip the civil surgeon and just send in a copy of your DS-3025. Here are details of how to know if your DS-3025 is ok to send alone or not : http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/335754-ds-3025-complete-or-not/page__p__4971318#entry4971318
  25. Like
    KayDeeCee got a reaction from The_Empyrean in Name Discrepancy RFE: Kindly Advise   
    Resend copy of marriage certificate and a new I-765, filling out her maiden name where it asks for 'Other Names Used (include Maiden Name)'. That is for any other names someone has ever legally used anytime in their lives, and specifically mentions to include maiden name. You list the maiden name there, as that is the name she previously was known as, and is the name from her other immigration documents, on her K-1 visa, in her passport and on her birth certificate. The I-485 has you enter the maiden name where it asks for you to list their name exactly as it is on their I-94.
    You can include a statement explaining that she changed her name through marriage, and you mistakenly forgot to put the maiden name on the form for 'other names used'. State that you are enclosing a copy of your marriage certificate as proof of name change.
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