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olna83

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  1. Like
    olna83 reacted to Shauneg in Passport order   
    You should be getting it soon. They give a timeframe but normally it's really an estimate that is based on many things. If it were I...I would wait one more week. In all my years and everyone I've ever come across, I have yet to see anybody's documentation get lost from the passport folks. I dealt with upwards of about 500 passports processed in my prior position at my job..and personally.
  2. Like
    olna83 reacted to Shauneg in Passport order   
    To answer your question more directly. 3 weeks is not uncommon. I would start calling after that point,
  3. Like
    olna83 reacted to Buckyball in Passport order   
    Took two weeks before I got mine back. Think it's a very weak system that people need to send the original certificate and it's even worse that they won't pay for a replacement if it's getting lost.
  4. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from JimmyHou in Document during citizenship interview   
    JimmyHou,
    I agree. That's why I pointed out "depending on a specific case". If there were any issues paying taxes in the past and an IO knows about it he may ask to provide transcripts to prove all has been settled.
    My friend was working on cash and she reported her earnings every year during the tax season. So when she applied for citizneship based on 5 yr rule the officer specifically wanted to review her tax returns for the last 5 years.
    I was told by my lawyer to bring copies/transcripts for the last 5 years (just in case) - although I was on payroll with all my employers and filed my taxes in a timely manner.
    Thanks!
  5. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from bappi48 in Document during citizenship interview   
    Grab your current state issued ID as well. My officer asked to show all: GC, passport and driver's license.
    Other than that - anything that is relevant to you specific case. Also, refer to the interview letter attachement - it should say what you have to bring. The following is what applicants here had to submit:
    1. If based on 5 yr rule - copies of the last 5 tax returns (transcripts, installement agreements if any).
    2. If based on 3 yr rule - copies of the last 3 tax returns (transcripts, installement agreements if any); if married - proof of that you're still married like copies of leases, bills, banking accounts. There were cases when they asked for it.
    3. If you had arrests/DUIs or traffic tickets and all were resolved - bring receipts, court dispositions or other related documentation showing it's resolved.
    4. If you are/were married bring the original and the copy of all marriage certificates/divorce decrees (if married more than once).
    5. If marriage certificate/divorce decree is in foreign language - bring a certified translated copy.
    6. They also suggest to have a letter of employment - to prove you currently have a job (not required but in some cases they may want to take a look at it).
    7. If you have your old foreign passport - they recommend to bring it as well especially if you traveled a lot and your trip history is torn between two passports.
    You know your situation better. And if there are issues you think they may question - bring everything that proves your good moral character. I hope it's all clean and smooth.
    So best of luck!
  6. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from Maria2012 in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  7. Like
    olna83 reacted to JimmyHou in Naturalization oath ceremony   
    As Olna said, you can correct this on the day of the ceremony. You may have to wait a day or two to get your certificate but you will take the oath and become a citizen that day. Make sure you tell them that there's a mistake when you check the certificate. If there is a mistake, they may want to see proof of your legal name so take your passport and birth certificate (and of course your green card) with you. If you are using a married name then also take your marriage certificate with you.
  8. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from Ortolan in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  9. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from sweet01 in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  10. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from Lauren and Kevin in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  11. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from TBoneTX in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  12. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from Eric & Idalia in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  13. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from Shauna&Wael in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  14. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from NancyNguyen in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  15. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from S_R in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  16. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from irina_frank in Interview and Oath Today - My experience   
    Hi all,
    I really need a big cup of frozen yogurt with a bunch of crunchy stuff in it.
    My immigration journey was finally over today at 8:45 am in the Newark office (Newark, NJ) when IO told me I'm approved and that the oath ceremony is in a few hours. The appointment was scheduled for 7:30 am so I was in the first group of applicants for a naturalization interview today. The waiting room is fairly big, with 8 windows and three doors. Although about dozen of people was sitting and waiting to be called there was no noise in the room, the clerks quietly and politely kept registering more applicants as those came in. A little before 8 one guy came out of the admin door, he was smiling and said "Welcome to the USCIS office in Newark, you can relax now and have your drinks. The vending machines are in the hall. There's also a cafeteria downstairs. We hold three oath ceremonies today and also give free US flags. So good luck to everyone!". Everyone got cheered up after his words and it all started. My attorney arrived about 8:15. She went over the copy of my N400 and then waved to a few officers she saw behind the windows. I'm sure all these standard things are not interesting to you so I'll start with the details of my case. I was nervously waiting to be called. The concerns were not over the civic test but over my moral character: - I was married twice (first ex-hb sponsored my GC, married for 4 years; second ex-hb is also US citizen but we were married for only 3 months). - I have 4 traffic violations for the last 5 years (cafeteria choice: 2 speeding tickets; driving on red light; improper cell phone usage while operating a vehicle). All is paid but as far as the last one - I didn't show up for the appeal in court as I forgot. I thought it'll be on the driving history. - I'm in installment agreement with the IRS to pay my 2014 balance till August of this year. BUT I PAID IT ALL OUT THE DAY BEFORE THE INTERVIEW. - I changed 5-6 addresses and never notified USCIS about it. There were more short term residences that I don't even remember. - I think that some time 5 years ago I applied online for a federal reserve position and checked off the status US citizen (because there was no choice for green card holders - only visa holder or US citizen). I think.. I don't recall... Anyways, the IO finally called my name, and we walked towards the door. As soon as the officer opened it for us my attorney said "I have G-28", and the office said "No problem". (Note, I decided to bring the attorney basically last minute). The officer is in his 50s, looked very serious... HEAVY South American accent... Although my brain slept only 5 hours it was fast enough to process what he said for the first time so I didn't have to ask to repeat. But let me tell you, if there was someone who doesn't speak and understand English well - he would have a horrible time to communicate with this officer. NO OFFENSE TO THE IO, just saying). He started from asking to raise the right hand and swear to tell the truth..Then he asked for my ID, GC and passport. Then he started discussing the situation with my first name because, as he said, it's confusing. It's translated from my language so it sounds different from what it generally is. I explained all and I said that I want to go by the normal version. So he changed it. Next question he asked is if I was out of country for more than 6 months. I said no. Then he asked if I have any children. I said no. What do I do for living, where I work and for how long (I've been doing accounting for 6 years). Then he asked what company did I work prior to that and where. I explained that I moved to NJ again last year as I got a job here, and before that I lived and worked in Boston. Then he asked how for long I was in Boston before I moved to NJ for the second time? Moved on to the next..,He asked for how long was my first marriage and when we got divorced and whether I have any children. I explained all and said I have no children (note: second question about kids). Then he went to another marriage. "Oh, that was very short. Did you sponsor him a green card?". I said no, he's a U.S. Citizen. (Note: I indicated it on N400). He asked for copies of marriage and divorce certificates for both marriages so he can keep them. "Did you have any children?" (Note: same question third time). I said no. "Were you ever arrested or cited..?". I said I have traffic tickets. "Any DUI?". I said no. Moving on... "Do you owe any taxes?". I said no. (I didn't want to start the story with the installment agreement and that I paid it off just now). Straight question - straight answer. Then he went over the standard list of questions on N400. Then he went to civic questions: - What group of people was brought to the States as slaves? - Why did the colonists fight the British? - Who's the Vice President of the United States? - How many amendments to the Constitution? - What is the highest court in the United States? - Who makes federal laws? Then he asked to read "Who can vote", and then he asked to write "Citizens can vote". "Congratulations, you passed the test, I recommend you for approval". He gave me two pieces of paper to sign and sent back to the waiting room. So I brought a pile of supporting paperwork and copies and he ended up asking only for copies of marriage certificates and divorce decrees. No IRS, no taxes, no tickets, no leases, no proof of bona fide marriage etc. I felt relieved. For a moment, as I was sitting and waiting for the oath, I looked around me and I thought... I'm surrounded by so many different cute happy faces with different skin colors; different languages are striking my ears; and those Indian ladies wearing gorgeous bright outfits walked by like flying butterflies... May be it's the lighting in the room but all seemed so shiny and colorful, so beautiful. I felt like I'm holding the whole world in my hand. Isn't it amazing what this country is like? It's the star-spangled rainbow of cultures, and I'm so lucky to be a part of it! The Oath Ceremony was amazing. The 12 pm group consisted of 55 people representing 30 countries! As they called a country name the person from that country had to stand up and everyone clapped their hands. Once "all countries stood up" we all said the Oath of Allegiance and Pledge of Allegiance. Then we watched a video of Obama's congratulations-speech, photos of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island with the patriotic song in the background. Now it wasn't the same to listen to the anthem. This got so deeply into my heart because I finally listened to it as something that belongs to me as well. I'm happy for all of them, I'm happy for their families and for their babies that were impatiently waiting for the moms-new citizens and crying every five minutes. As far the clothing style of people... Everything from flip flops and beach dresses to formal suits. I was formal because that's my usual style for work, and I like it. But I don't judge people. After all it's the final step that should be joyful. Thank you VJs for all your input and encouraging words! Btw, the picture they put on my certificate is the one I submitted with N400 which is great (not the one they took during biometrics).
  17. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from patrickleevill in change employer after GC   
    Yes, there's a chance that during the naturalization process USCIS may suspect a fraud if you left your employer right after obtaining your GC - especially if you had a contract with the hospital obligating you to stay with them for a certain time period upon receiving the GC. It won't be considered an employment based on a "good faith" unless there's a valid reason of the voluntary job termination - like serious family issues or hospital lay-offs...
  18. Like
    olna83 reacted to aldksjglsdgdksjg in N-400 December 2014 Filers   
    If this ceremony has some deep meaning to you, that you think is properly marked by dressing formally, then go right ahead. But for some peoplemyself includedit was a pompous, self-congratulatory inconvenience that typified the pernicious oversimplifications of American exceptionalism. We won't begrudge you your suit, but we'll wear whatever we damn well please. I don't think the flag in my courtroom noticed what I was wearing, and even if it did: I live in the U.S. because I admire a country that doesn't give legal rights to anything as meaningless as a piece of cloth.
  19. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from bluebook14 in Girlfriend w/ Illegal Situation   
    Hey dude, watch your language.. but most important - I suggest you to start thinking as a smart person...(no offense!)
    Because what you said sounds like it's coming out of the superficial mind...
    Go to EIOR virtual library and read law cases against foreigners that violated immigration rules for the last hundred years including nowadays..You'll find "babes" and "dudes" from many cultures, and their stories are more twisted than this one.
    http://www.justice.gov/eoir/ag-bia-decisions
    Yes, the girl did absolutely wrong...But the author of the post was brave enough to share such a personal thing. It doesnt mean that he's the only one out there to experience this.
  20. Like
    olna83 reacted to JimmyHou in Calling USCIS to check the status   
    I think you meant to say, "yay!"
    :-)
  21. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from JimmyHou in N400 interview experience in NYC   
    I guess you just need to go through topics related to monthly filers from at least 3 months ago. That's how I try to find shared interview experience from my local office.
  22. Like
    olna83 reacted to lmatos1978 in Information About your residence   
    I've never used AR11 form, to be honest I didn't know I had to notify USCIS every time I move (that's my own fault), got my GC 10 years ago and moved quite of bit, I just had my citizenship interview last Tuesday and that was not brought up, the IO did asked how long I've been living at the apt I'm right now, told him a year and I've been within the same apartment complex for 5 years now. I think as long as you have been living longer than 3 months at your current address you should be fine, I could be wrong, but at least in my case not filing an AR11 form was not an issue.
  23. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from love4life09 in Don't be lulled into thinking N400 interview is casual   
    Sorry to hear it...My name situation is very similar to that of your wife. I'm myself coming from a former Soviet Ukraine. The name on the passport, Driver's License and Green Card is how they translated it in modern times - not how it was always known. And the USCIS sent me both - receipt letter and the biometric invitation using the other first name (not the one on GC). Mind you, I called them immediately after I got the receipt and asked to correct the first name to avoid name confusion in the future.
    Now I'm worried....
  24. Like
    olna83 reacted to kamw in interview tomorrow. important question!   
    Not this again... this topic will never give you one answer.
    At my interview (November) I was told that I shouldn't have listed my tickets once the IO reviwed my documentation. but i still advise you to bring the documentation. While they are going through hand them the paperwork showing you paid it and it is settled. Explain you did not think it was a citation (you misunderstood) but while doing research for the interview you see where you should had listed it. Better safe than sorry. My sister ended up being delayed for 6 months over traffic tickets cause her IO was new.
  25. Like
    olna83 got a reaction from JimmyHou in interview tomorrow. important question!   
    I disagree with you on this one. If he doesn't volunteer he may (or may - not depending on the officer's mood) get in trouble since the officer asks you to swear that the information he provided on N400 is correct. And if he had a citation that he didn't disclose on the N400 he has to bring it up verbally during the interview when the officer will go through his application.
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