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Does anyone know the approximate I-130 processing time for Colombia?(unmarried child over 21)

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hi, Does anyone know where I can find out how long it takes to Process an I-130 for someone born in Colombia?This would be for an unmarried child, over age 21.

Also does the I-130 always depend on one's country of birth for the processing time consideration?The beneficiary in this case is also a dual citizen,from Italy.

thanks

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You can look at https://egov.uscis.gov/cris/processTimesDisplayInit.do to get a view of i130 processing times at various USCIS centers. Average processing time is 5 months. Processing of i130 has nothing to do with the beneficiary's country.


Spouse:

2015-06-16: I-130 Sent

2015-08-17: I-130 approved

2015-09-23: NVC received file

2015-10-05: NVC assigned Case number, Invoice ID & Beneficiary ID

2016-06-30: DS-261 completed, AOS Fee Paid, WL received

2016-07-05: Received IV invoice, IV Fee Paid

2016-07-06: DS-260 Submitted

2016-07-07: AOS and IV Package mailed

2016-07-08: NVC Scan

2016-08-08: Case Complete

2017-06-30: Interview, approved

2017-07-04: Visa in hand

2017-08-01: Entry to US

.

.

.

.

Myself:

2016-05-10: N-400 Sent

2016-05-16: N-400 NOA1

2016-05-26: Biometrics

2017-01-30: Interview

2017-03-02: Oath Ceremony

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Thanks for the clarifcation.So if it isnt the I-130 that we would be waiting for(only 5 months) what is it we will be waiting for, adjustment of status? An entry visa? I guess I'm a little confused on this.

What happens after the I-130 is approved?

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hi

the wait is over 7 years until there is a visa available

the i130 is only the first step, it can take from several months to several years to be approved

once approved it will be sent to the National Visa Center or NVC where it will be stored until your priority date becomes current or possibly a year prior to that, immigration will contact your dad or mom to continue the process. Once the petitioner receives a copy of the approved i130 you can check the monthly visa bulletin to see how the priority dates progress

there are more payments, forms and documents to be sent until your case is complete and sent to the US Embassy in Bogota where you will have your interview. Before your interview you will have to do your fingerprints and medical in your country

when approved, you will have your visa in your passport and ready to come to the US

but total wait is over 7 years

Edited by aleful

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I'm still a little confused,The first reply says an I-130 takes 5 months,you say it is longer.(the USCIS page also says 5 mos I-130 processing time for an LPR's unmarried son or daughter).So again, what is the next step after an I-130 is approved, AOS?

The daughter of the LPR is already in the US under VWP. Since they are already in the US legally, can we send in the I-495 along with the I-130?

Also does total processing time for bringing an LPR's unmarried son or daughter depend on country of birth,or the country of current nationality?

Is there a step-by-step guide somewhere for this whole process?

thanks in advance

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As said, I-130 is the just the first step which takes around 5 months. The date USCIS received i130 package is called the Priority Date (PD). The PD is written on the receipt notice of i130.

Currently, people with PD of 08Nov2009 or earlier than that are being processed either for interview (outside the US) or for AOS (within the US). Look at the following link for F2B.

https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/law-and-policy/bulletin/2016/visa-bulletin-for-july-2016.html

So no matter when i130 is approved, the daughter you mentioned has to wait for almost 7 years before she can start visa or AOS process. In other words, she is not allowed to file for i485 now even if she is in the US.

Right now, there is nothing to do other than wait for i130 approval and then wait 6-7 years. If she is in legal status in the US at that time, she can start the AOS process. If she is outside the US, she will be starting NVC/visa process. You can look up the AOS or NVC guides in this forum but those will come into play only after 7 years or so.


Spouse:

2015-06-16: I-130 Sent

2015-08-17: I-130 approved

2015-09-23: NVC received file

2015-10-05: NVC assigned Case number, Invoice ID & Beneficiary ID

2016-06-30: DS-261 completed, AOS Fee Paid, WL received

2016-07-05: Received IV invoice, IV Fee Paid

2016-07-06: DS-260 Submitted

2016-07-07: AOS and IV Package mailed

2016-07-08: NVC Scan

2016-08-08: Case Complete

2017-06-30: Interview, approved

2017-07-04: Visa in hand

2017-08-01: Entry to US

.

.

.

.

Myself:

2016-05-10: N-400 Sent

2016-05-16: N-400 NOA1

2016-05-26: Biometrics

2017-01-30: Interview

2017-03-02: Oath Ceremony

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hi

for immigration, the time for processing isn't a priority, and she doesn't qualify for adjustment of status,

as said the wait is over 7 years. the adjustment of status is for immediate relatives that have no period of waiting, she has to return before the 90 days are over

I already explained it, after the i130 is approved, the case will be sent to NVC, where it will sit, there is nothing to do until immigration contacts the petitioner,

in 6 or more years

in this case the waiting process is the same for both countries, they are in the same category, so the waiting period is the same, over 7 years

and the approval of the i130 depends on how many cases is the Service Center handling

it doesn't really matter how long the i130 takes to be approved, the wait is still the same

Edited by aleful

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thanks Arken for the detailed answer.Since an I-130 asks only for country of birth,I'm assuming this is the only dertermining factor for processing time,not the country of current nationality

Country of birth doesn't make any difference in your case. This is purely biographic data collected by USCIS and has no bearing on the processing time. It only makes a difference for Mexican and Filipino applicants in that they have to wait even longer for a visa number to be available. You have the shortest wait at 7 years. Be thankful!


 

 

 

 

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Thanks JFH,that answered a lot of questions.

Another question-When the LPR petitioner becomes a citizen,(possibly next year) approximately how long will the difference in waiting time be?

Also, even if the petitioner is a citizen, do unmarried beneficiaries continue to enjoy a shorter waiting time than married beneficiaries,or would it be the same?

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hi

it's about the same, over 7 years for an unmarried child of a USC, if you marry the waiting time is more, it would take over 10 years of waiting, but your spouse and any children you had would come with you as your derivatives

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To put it in perspective, at her age US immigration considers your daughter an adult who can have her own life without the need of her parents. She can get a job, travel, buy a house, or even get married. So getting a visa for is a low priority for immigration hence the long wait.

In addition to her remaining unmarried during this process also ensure she never overstays on her visits.


“When starting an immigration journey, the best advice is to understand that sacrifices have to be made; whether it is time, money, or separation or a combination of any or all.” - NuestraUnion

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To put it in perspective, at her age US immigration considers your daughter an adult who can have her own life without the need of her parents. She can get a job, travel, buy a house, or even get married. So getting a visa for is a low priority for immigration hence the long wait.

In addition to her remaining unmarried during this process also ensure she never overstays on her visits.

And this is what I find odd. Adult children are low priority - completely understand that and agree with it. But why are parents of US citizens processed as immeduate relatives like spouses? I have seen parents whose I-130s were sent to Nebraska after mine (I'm a wife of a USC) that have already been approved. From the Philippines, by the way. Why would they have such priority? Adults don't need their parents with them more than I need to be with my husband.


 

 

 

 

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And this is what I find odd. Adult children are low priority - completely understand that and agree with it. But why are parents of US citizens processed as immeduate relatives like spouses? I have seen parents whose I-130s were sent to Nebraska after mine (I'm a wife of a USC) that have already been approved. From the Philippines, by the way. Why would they have such priority? Adults don't need their parents with them more than I need to be with my husband.

I have the same thoughts. To me it would seem that parents would be lower priority because they would have had established a life in their country. It would seem easier for a single 22 y/o to migrate than a 60+ married couple who lived, worked, and raised family all their lives in one country.

Would love to know how this was decided but i just add it to my long list of immigration mystery.


“When starting an immigration journey, the best advice is to understand that sacrifices have to be made; whether it is time, money, or separation or a combination of any or all.” - NuestraUnion

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