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zinger143

Experience with translating official documents?

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According to the instructions:

Any document submitted to USCIS with information in a foreign language must be accompanied by a full English translation. The translator must certify that the English language translation is complete and accurate, and that he or she is competent to translate from the foreign language into English.

I am able to do that, however, I was wondering if anyone has had any problems translating official documents and getting flagged, or had any issues. I would have to translate his birth certificate and then his police certificate that states he was charged but not convicted of crimes. I am confident in my abilities, but will the fact that I am the one translating the documents cause any red flags or issues, or will they simply have a Spanish speaker look it over for acurateness and if it's right move along. I would assume for things like the police certificate they're not going to take my word on it....

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For the K-1 visa interview, most consulates accept documents in English or the native language of the country you interview in. Do your instructions from the consulate state you need an English translation of anything you provide to the consulate. This would be DoS and not something you send to the USCIS.


Link to K-1 instructions for Ciudad Juarez, Mexico > http://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/K1/CDJ%20-%20Ciudad%20Juarez.pdf

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I was looking for the AOS here in the states after the k1 is approved

You can translate them yourself with no issue.


K-1
NOA1: 04/08/2014; NOA2: 04/21/2014; Visa interview, approved: 07/15/2014; POE: 07/25/2014; Marriage: 09/05/2014

 

AOS

NOA1:  09/12/2014;  Biometrics:  10/06/2014;  EAD/AP Received:  11/26/2014;

Interview Waiver Letter:  01/02/2015;  RFE:  07/09/2015;

Permanent Residency Granted:  07/27/2015;  Green card Received:  08/22/2015

 

ROC

05/23/2017 -- Mailed ROC application

05/24/2017 -- NOA1 date

05/30/2017 -- NOA1 received in the mail

06/05/2017 -- Biometrics letter received

06/13/2017 -- Biometrics appointment

09/05/2018 -- Approved without interview!

09/13/2018 -- 10 Yr Green card Received

 

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I was looking for the AOS here in the states after the k1 is approved

Okay, then I will move your post to the correct forum.

Why would you need the police certificate for AOS? The birth certificate can be translated by anyone fluent in both languages. Whoever does the translation needs to add this certification to the translated document > http://www.visajourney.com/content/translations

~ Moved from K-1 Process to AOS from Family Based Visas - topic is AOS, not K-1 ~


Link to K-1 instructions for Ciudad Juarez, Mexico > http://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/K1/CDJ%20-%20Ciudad%20Juarez.pdf

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Even if you know the language fluently, they want a certified translation. There are individuals and companies that can provide certified copies. There are boards that certify people to do this for official purposes.

I had to get my husbands birth certificate translated. I used the Translation and Interpretation Network (TIN), a business venture of Catholic Charities, Fort Worth, TX. I used to work for them and trust their services completely. They were also drastically cheaper than most asking for $100 for one silly page. They did it for more than half. I don't live in Texas at all now, but they took a scanned copy and emailed me, then snail mailed me the certified copy. VERY easy to work with them and super responsive.

That is my advise here. I decided to do a professional translation over having a non-certified friend translate bc I am not interested in delays over things like that.

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Even if you know the language fluently, they want a certified translation. There are individuals and companies that can provide certified copies. There are boards that certify people to do this for official purposes.

I had to get my husbands birth certificate translated. I used the Translation and Interpretation Network (TIN), a business venture of Catholic Charities, Fort Worth, TX. I used to work for them and trust their services completely. They were also drastically cheaper than most asking for $100 for one silly page. They did it for more than half. I don't live in Texas at all now, but they took a scanned copy and emailed me, then snail mailed me the certified copy. VERY easy to work with them and super responsive.

That is my advise here. I decided to do a professional translation over having a non-certified friend translate bc I am not interested in delays over things like that.

Yes, USCIS wants a certified translation. This, however, does not mean they are asking for a professionally certified translation. From: http://www.uscis.gov/forms/forms-and-fees/general-tips-assembling-applications-mailing

Please submit certified translations for all foreign language documents. The translator must certify that s/he is competent to translate and that the translation is accurate.

The certification format should include the certifier's name, signature, address, and date of certification. A suggested format is:

Certification by Translator

I [typed name], certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and ________ languages, and that the above/attached document is an accurate translation of the document attached entitled ______________________________.

Signature_________________________________

Date Typed Name

Address

Let me explain what "must certify" means. It does not mean "must professionally certify", meaning having a license or accreditation for doing translations professionally. It simply means testifying to the fact that you are "competent to translate and that the translation is accurate".

Anyone who is fluent can translate. I have translated documents before, using the above certification statement, with no issues whatsoever with USCIS. And it didn't cost me a cent.


K-1
NOA1: 04/08/2014; NOA2: 04/21/2014; Visa interview, approved: 07/15/2014; POE: 07/25/2014; Marriage: 09/05/2014

 

AOS

NOA1:  09/12/2014;  Biometrics:  10/06/2014;  EAD/AP Received:  11/26/2014;

Interview Waiver Letter:  01/02/2015;  RFE:  07/09/2015;

Permanent Residency Granted:  07/27/2015;  Green card Received:  08/22/2015

 

ROC

05/23/2017 -- Mailed ROC application

05/24/2017 -- NOA1 date

05/30/2017 -- NOA1 received in the mail

06/05/2017 -- Biometrics letter received

06/13/2017 -- Biometrics appointment

09/05/2018 -- Approved without interview!

09/13/2018 -- 10 Yr Green card Received

 

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Yes, USCIS wants a certified translation. This, however, does not mean they are asking for a professionally certified translation. From: http://www.uscis.gov/forms/forms-and-fees/general-tips-assembling-applications-mailing

Please submit certified translations for all foreign language documents. The translator must certify that s/he is competent to translate and that the translation is accurate.

The certification format should include the certifier's name, signature, address, and date of certification. A suggested format is:

Certification by Translator

I [typed name], certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and ________ languages, and that the above/attached document is an accurate translation of the document attached entitled ______________________________.

Signature_________________________________

Date Typed Name

Address

Let me explain what "must certify" means. It does not mean "must professionally certify", meaning having a license or accreditation for doing translations professionally. It simply means testifying to the fact that you are "competent to translate and that the translation is accurate".

Anyone who is fluent can translate. I have translated documents before, using the above certification statement, with no issues whatsoever with USCIS. And it didn't cost me a cent.

That's good information to know. thanks for sharing.

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A police certificate is needed for the K-1 visa interview. It is not needed for AOS. If you have a criminal history, you need to provide court orders/records with the I-485.


Link to K-1 instructions for Ciudad Juarez, Mexico > http://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/K1/CDJ%20-%20Ciudad%20Juarez.pdf

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I knew I needed it for the entire process, in order to AOS, you need to submit several forms and on one of those I read you needed to provide a copy of the police certificate. I have a list of the required documents needed after reading over the instructions and questions, so in general in order to adjust status, one of those forms requires you to not be a public charge and you need the certificate that clears them. It could be the I-485, all I know is in order to successfully adjust status with all the forms you must submit with it in order to be approved and move forward with the process I will need it!

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You do not need a police certificate for AOS. You provide an I-864 to show the immigrant won't become a public charge. http://www.visajourney.com/content/k1k3aos


Link to K-1 instructions for Ciudad Juarez, Mexico > http://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/K1/CDJ%20-%20Ciudad%20Juarez.pdf

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I knew I needed it for the entire process, in order to AOS, you need to submit several forms and on one of those I read you needed to provide a copy of the police certificate. I have a list of the required documents needed after reading over the instructions and questions, so in general in order to adjust status, one of those forms requires you to not be a public charge and you need the certificate that clears them. It could be the I-485, all I know is in order to successfully adjust status with all the forms you must submit with it in order to be approved and move forward with the process I will need it!

The meaning of public charge here is not in reference to criminal records. This is in reference to being dependent on the public for government aid. When you apply for certain types of government aid (means-tested benefits) due to lack of income, it is the general public (the taxpayers) who are "charged" with giving you aid. Thus, you would be considered a "public charge" in this case. In order to prove to USCIS that you will not become a public charge, you need a sponsor that will sign a contract with the government, called Form I-864 Affidavit of Support. A police certificate is not needed.

Edited by Zedayn

K-1
NOA1: 04/08/2014; NOA2: 04/21/2014; Visa interview, approved: 07/15/2014; POE: 07/25/2014; Marriage: 09/05/2014

 

AOS

NOA1:  09/12/2014;  Biometrics:  10/06/2014;  EAD/AP Received:  11/26/2014;

Interview Waiver Letter:  01/02/2015;  RFE:  07/09/2015;

Permanent Residency Granted:  07/27/2015;  Green card Received:  08/22/2015

 

ROC

05/23/2017 -- Mailed ROC application

05/24/2017 -- NOA1 date

05/30/2017 -- NOA1 received in the mail

06/05/2017 -- Biometrics letter received

06/13/2017 -- Biometrics appointment

09/05/2018 -- Approved without interview!

09/13/2018 -- 10 Yr Green card Received

 

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Sorry, not public charge, you have to prove they haven’t committed any acts of moral turpitude and my fiancée had his ex come up with random charges against him but was not convicted for any of them because they were bogus. However, if you answer yes that you’ve been arrested you need to include the evidence that they were never convicted, enter the special police certificate that shows he has never committed or been convicted of any acts of moral turpitude.

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The I-485 instructions state they want the arrest records and dismissal/acquittal records from the court. If he was arrested and no charges were filed, does he have the court records of his arrest stating the charges were dropped?

Also, the question about moral turpitude, Part 3, #1 a., asks if you knowingly committed any crime of moral turpitude or a drug-related offense for which you have not been arrested. If you did not commit such crimes, then you would check 'No'. You do not have to provide a police certificate to prove that when checking No.

If you were arrested for something, even if no charges were filed, then you would need to answer Yes to that question, Part 3, #1 b., and they want the court records and an explanation.

http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/files/form/i-485.pdf

Answer the following questions. (If your answer is "Yes" to any question, explain on a separate piece of paper. Continuation pages
must be submitted according to the guidelines provided on Page 2 of the instructions under "What Are the General Filing
Instructions?" Information about documentation that must be include with your application is also provide in this section.) Answering
"Yes" does not necessarily mean that you are not entitled to adjust status or register for permanent residence.

1. Have you EVER, in or outside the United States:

a. Knowingly committed any crime of moral turpitude or a drug-related offense for which you have not been
arrested?

b. Been arrested, cited, charged, indicted, convicted, fined, or imprisoned for breaking or violating any law
or ordinance, excluding traffic violations?

...

http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/files/form/i-485instr.pdf

1. Criminal history

A. If you have ever been arrested or detained by any law
enforcement officer for any reason, and no charges
were filed, submit:
An original official statement by the arresting agency
or applicable court order confirming that no charges
were filed.

B. If you have ever been arrested or detained by any law
enforcement officer for any reason, and charges were
filed, or if charges were filed against you without an
arrest, submit:
An original or court-certified copy of the complete
arrest record and/or disposition for each incident
(e.g., dismissal order, conviction record, or acquittal
order).


Link to K-1 instructions for Ciudad Juarez, Mexico > http://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/K1/CDJ%20-%20Ciudad%20Juarez.pdf

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