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lauraandehsanm

4 years older (Red Flag?)

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My fiance and I will be getting married in October, and then pursuing a CR1 Visa. I am nervous that we will be red flagged for many reasons, and it makes me sad because our relationship is genuine :(. Reason 1) I am 4 years older than him. Reason 2) I have been married twice before (no children) (if they would let me explain the previous marriages I am sure they would understand why I got divorced!). Reason 3) I brought my second husband to America using a Marriage Visa (DCF) However we were divorced before the two year period to lift the conditions of his green card.(let's just say he went crazy once he was in america, not the way a married man should). And Reason 4) My fiance is Afghan, and not sure if just his nationality alone will send up red flags :(. We are both muslim and both very devout in our religion and realize marriage is not a joke. He has never been married before. I am embarrassed of two failed marriages, but what is past is past and I can not change it. :unsure:

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Four years is not a large gap, that would not be a reason for denial. Being married more than once and having an ex from out of the country is a reason for them to scrutinize the case closely, but if you prove the relationship is legit they shouldn't deny you. As for being Afghan I can't say much because I don't know the approval rate on that country.

Best thing to do is have as much evidence as is possible and be prepared for questioning, unless your future husband has a record, I don't think they will deny you solely on what info you've supplied here.

Best of luck to you both!


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Four years is not a large gap, that would not be a reason for denial. Being married more than once and having an ex from out of the country is a reason for them to scrutinize the case closely, but if you prove the relationship is legit they shouldn't deny you. As for being Afghan I can't say much because I don't know the approval rate on that country.

Best thing to do is have as much evidence as is possible and be prepared for questioning, unless your future husband has a record, I don't think they will deny you solely on what info you've supplied here.

Best of luck to you both!

Thanks so much for your reply! Thank goodness he has no record. Actually it's the opposite! He worked as a translator with the US military for two years while in Afghanistan :) And the one who will be his co-sponsor for the visa is a high ranking retired military officer whom he worked with :) (not sure if that will help or not!)

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My fiance and I will be getting married in October, and then pursuing a CR1 Visa. I am nervous that we will be red flagged for many reasons, and it makes me sad because our relationship is genuine :(. Reason 1) I am 4 years older than him. Reason 2) I have been married twice before (no children) (if they would let me explain the previous marriages I am sure they would understand why I got divorced!). Reason 3) I brought my second husband to America using a Marriage Visa (DCF) However we were divorced before the two year period to lift the conditions of his green card.(let's just say he went crazy once he was in america, not the way a married man should). And Reason 4) My fiance is Afghan, and not sure if just his nationality alone will send up red flags :(. We are both muslim and both very devout in our religion and realize marriage is not a joke. He has never been married before. I am embarrassed of two failed marriages, but what is past is past and I can not change it. :unsure:

1 - 4 years older is not much of a gap and it will not raise any red flags.

3 - Your second husband coming to US might be a red flag (You probably had to send in an Affidavit of Support for him). Even divorced, if he is still in America and still on that Green Card, you could be bound to that support agreement. I am not sure about it though. There are more experienced people around here who might be able to give you a more accurate answer.

4. With your husband to be having worked for US military, his nationality should not be a problem.


Married: 12/01/2011
USCIS Stage:
I-130 sent: 12/29/2011 NOA1: 01/03/2012 NOA2: 09/24/2012 (Text and website) - 09/28/2012 (In mail) <265 days to approval from NOA1 date>
I-129F sent: 01/14/2012 NOA1: 01/18/2012 NOA2: 09/27/2012 (Withdrawn)
RFE: 08/13/2012 "Proof of Bona Fide marital relationship". (Took them 7 months, 1 week and 4 days to send an RFE).
RFE Responce received by CSC-USCIS on 09/07/2012.
NVC Stage:
NVC Received: 10/09/2012
NVC issued Case #, IIN and BIN: 10/10/2012
IV Package Received at NVC: 12/03/2012

EMBASSY STAGE:
interview March 20, 2013 : results AP (sent in paperwork for co-sponsor received 4-20-2013)

Issued: September 30, 2013

POE: Raleigh-Durham International Airport, NC @ 10-17-2013 (Easy entry, pleasant experience).

Removal of Conditions on Residence:

Filed: August 14, 2015 - VSC

NOA1: 08/19/2015

Date of Decision: 06-03-2013

Letter of Approval received: 06-09-2016

Green Card received: 07-15-2016

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1 - 4 years older is not much of a gap and it will not raise any red flags.

3 - Your second husband coming to US might be a red flag (You probably had to send in an Affidavit of Support for him). Even divorced, if he is still in America and still on that Green Card, you could be bound to that support agreement. I am not sure about it though. There are more experienced people around here who might be able to give you a more accurate answer.

4. With your husband to be having worked for US military, his nationality should not be a problem.

Thank you for your reply! I hope someone will know about #2) If me being divorced will be a problem since I did do an affidavit of support for him. He has since gotten his 10 green card (after we divorced he hired a lawyer to pursue the process)

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