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Penguin_ie

Social Security benefits when living outside USA?

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ireland
Timeline

I am not planning this, but the question came up because I know I can get my Irish pension here in the USA once I am old enough:

If someone does not live in the USA anymore, are they entitled to pension/ social security etc once they are old enough? I know veterans benefits can be gotten while living abroad but that is a bit different.

If one is entitled to a state pension even if living abroad, does it depend on whether they are a US citizen or (expired) greencard holder? How long does one have to work in the USA to receive such benefits when abroad?


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Brazil
Timeline

you might ask in Working & Traveling During US Immigration as that's where the ss expert hangs out.


* ~ * Charles * ~ *
 

I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy.

 

USE THE REPORT BUTTON INSTEAD OF MESSAGING A MODERATOR!

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ireland
Timeline

***** Moving my own topic as per Deputy Mod recommendation *****


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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ssa.gov has all the answers - and it's a yes if you qualify by age and status (USC, LPR) - they have a list of countries in which you can continue to receive your benefits.


ROC 2009
Naturalization 2010

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Filed: Timeline

An individual’s eligibility to receive Social Security benefits while outside the U.S. will depend on his or her country of citizenship and residence.

Payments Abroad Screening Tool:

http://www.ssa.gov/international/payments_outsideUS.html

Payments While You Are Outside The United States,” publication number 05-10137:

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10137.html

An agreement between the United States and Ireland improves Social Security protection for people who work or have worked in both countries. It helps many people who, without the agreement, would not be eligible for monthly retirement, disability or survivors benefits under the Social Security system of one or both countries:

http://www.ssa.gov/international/Agreement_Pamphlets/ireland.html

Call 410-965-0144 if you have questions on benefits under the agreement or call 410-965-3549 or 410-965-7386 for questions on the coverage rules of the agreement. You can call Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. (Eastern U.S. Time) or write to:

Social Security Administration

Office of International Programs

P.O. Box 17741

Baltimore, Maryland 21235-7741

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Brazil
Timeline

^^^^ and there is the expert! bowing.gif


* ~ * Charles * ~ *
 

I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy.

 

USE THE REPORT BUTTON INSTEAD OF MESSAGING A MODERATOR!

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Filed: Other Timeline

Agreed. Just keep also in mind that the US and Ireland talk to each other in regard to social benefits. I have a brain blockage regarding the exact term they use for that, but since I just received a letter from my former home country regarding my retirement benefits I looked it up and learned once more that I can't play 'em both for double cashout.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Ireland
Timeline

Shucks

I guess I move on to plan B .

Agreed. Just keep also in mind that the US and Ireland talk to each other in regard to social benefits. I have a brain blockage regarding the exact term they use for that, but since I just received a letter from my former home country regarding my retirement benefits I looked it up and learned once more that I can't play 'em both for double cashout.


“Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.”

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Vietnam
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:thumbs:

Edited by ScottThuy

"Every one of us bears within himself the possibilty of all passions, all destinies of life in all its forms. Nothing human is foreign to us" - Edward G. Robinson.

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