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ventoux

Benefactor Name Change 6 years ago... relevant?

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Czech Republic
Timeline

If the benefactor had a (first) name change change 6 years ago, should that be indicated anywhere? When we met 6 years ago, she still had a passport and J1 visa for the US under her old first name.

Most of the questions on the I-129F are asking for information within the past 2 years so I'm not sure if it should be included (especially on the G-325A "All Other Names" or perhaps in other forms in the application)

Thanks for any advice!


2005 - We first met

2011-06-08: I-129F Sent

2011-06-14: NOA1

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If the benefactor had a (first) name change change 6 years ago, should that be indicated anywhere? When we met 6 years ago, she still had a passport and J1 visa for the US under her old first name.

Most of the questions on the I-129F are asking for information within the past 2 years so I'm not sure if it should be included (especially on the G-325A "All Other Names" or perhaps in other forms in the application)

Thanks for any advice!

All other names used is not restricted to a time period. They also want name change document and translation. At the embassy stage, and possibly at USCIS, they would certainly want to know when they are doing name checks on her. For instance you mentioned the J1 visa which she got under her previous name which if they find out was hers but under a different name that you didn't tell them about seems could raise suscpicions.

Edited by LookyWhatIFound

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Filed: Other Country: China
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All other names used is not restricted to a time period. They also want name change document and translation. At the embassy stage, and possibly at USCIS, they would certainly want to know when they are doing name checks on her. For instance you mentioned the J1 visa which she got under her previous name which if they find out was hers but under a different name that you didn't tell them about seems could raise suscpicions.

Correct, indicate the other name used in the applicable sections of the G325a and I-129F, then provide a photocopy of the official name change document along with the petition. USCIS will also want this. It is so stated in the I-129F instructions.


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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Czech Republic
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Correct, indicate the other name used in the applicable sections of the G325a and I-129F, then provide a photocopy of the official name change document along with the petition. USCIS will also want this. It is so stated in the I-129F instructions.

Thanks for the help. As far as the documents to support the name change, I have these but they are not in English. I assume I will have to get them translated and notarized for the I-129F? Or is it only important for the interview, which would take place in the country where it's the native language and therefore not require translating or notarization?

Edited by ventoux

2005 - We first met

2011-06-08: I-129F Sent

2011-06-14: NOA1

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Filed: Other Country: China
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Thanks for the help. As far as the documents to support the name change, I have these but they are not in English. I assume I will have to get them translated and notarized for the I-129F? Or is it only important for the interview, which would take place in the country where it's the native language and therefore not require translating or notarization?

It is important for USCIS, so you must obtain a certified translation. Notarized, has nothing to do with it. Read the translation instructions in the I-129F instructions.


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Yes, I see that it should be translated by a "certified" translator where the person translating says "I am certified." Seems a bit unofficial to me. I have also seen a post on VJ where it says that only legal documents (such as birth certificates and name changes) need to be notarized.

Obviously we can translate them ourselves = easy.

Or we can have someone do it who is a lawyer and an official translator in court, maybe that is more authoritative.

Or we can have the official translator translate it, and who says we can have it notarized in accordance to the laws of the country where they affix a plethora of stamps, stickers, ribbons, and maybe a smiley face and a gold star if we do a good job.

Many degrees of hassle here. Which is necessary for a legal form that says someone's first name given at birth is now something else?

Edited by ventoux

2005 - We first met

2011-06-08: I-129F Sent

2011-06-14: NOA1

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Filed: Other Country: China
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Yes, I see that it should be translated by a "certified" translator where the person translating says "I am certified." Seems a bit unofficial to me. I have also seen a post on VJ where it says that only legal documents (such as birth certificates and name changes) need to be notarized.

Obviously we can translate them ourselves = easy.

Or we can have someone do it who is a lawyer and an official translator in court, maybe that is more authoritative.

Or we can have the official translator translate it, and who says we can have it notarized in accordance to the laws of the country where they affix a plethora of stamps, stickers, ribbons, and maybe a smiley face and a gold star if we do a good job.

Many degrees of hassle here. Which is necessary for a legal form that says someone's first name given at birth is now something else?

In this process, it is critical that you read carefully and interpret literally. No, the instructions don't mention a "certified translator". Yes, anybody fluent in both languages and capable of translating, can certify the translations for USCIS. For some countries and circumstances, Consulates will only accept official translations from a government agency. China is one of those and those translations are called "Notarial Translations". However, in China, a Notary serves far greater purpose than in most of the rest of the world. For you, no notarization is required for anything you would submit to USCIS.

Edited by pushbrk

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Czech Republic
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Thanks, pushbrk! Great to get that cleared up. I think we will get it notarized for the interview and for future reference, but do the translation for the i-129f / G-325A ourselves.


2005 - We first met

2011-06-08: I-129F Sent

2011-06-14: NOA1

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Filed: Other Country: China
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Thanks, pushbrk! Great to get that cleared up. I think we will get it notarized for the interview and for future reference, but do the translation for the i-129f / G-325A ourselves.

There would be no reason to have a US Notary witness your signature on the translation. I mentioned nothing of the kind. You'll want to research the specific Consulate's requirements and make sure you comply with them. They may not even require a translation of a document already in the local language at all. It is RARE that a Consulate WOULD have any special requirement. I just mentioned an example where then do. No idea about Prague. You need to find out though.


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Understanding the big picture is priceless. Anonymous

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A Warning to Green Card Holders About Voting

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/606646-a-warning-to-green-card-holders-about-voting/

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I agree. However since the birth certificate, old J-1 visa, and SSN are all in a different name it might come in handy eventually simply due to the importance of those documents.


2005 - We first met

2011-06-08: I-129F Sent

2011-06-14: NOA1

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Filed: Other Country: China
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I agree. However since the birth certificate, old J-1 visa, and SSN are all in a different name it might come in handy eventually simply due to the importance of those documents.

Yes, but notarization (witnessing a signature) is not helpful in establishing the validity of a translation.


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Understanding the big picture is priceless. Anonymous

Google Who is Pushbrk?

A Warning to Green Card Holders About Voting

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/606646-a-warning-to-green-card-holders-about-voting/

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I believe that USCIS does not allow you to do your own translations, as this would be self-serving. You need someone else (neutral) to certify that they are competent in both languages and that the translation is accurate.

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I believe that USCIS does not allow you to do your own translations, as this would be self-serving. You need someone else (neutral) to certify that they are competent in both languages and that the translation is accurate.

You believe wrong. They DO allow you to certify your own translations. Yes, I think it's better if somebody else does it for you or you do the work, they check it over and sign the certification BUT, definitely USCIS allows you to do your own.


Facts are cheap...knowing how to use them is precious...
Understanding the big picture is priceless. Anonymous

Google Who is Pushbrk?

A Warning to Green Card Holders About Voting

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/606646-a-warning-to-green-card-holders-about-voting/

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