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Huh !! Read this !! Shame on USA !!

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Filed: Lift. Cond. (pnd) Country: India
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Huh !! Read this !! Shame on USA !!

Found this at this CNN MONEY Link

Even if 1% of this news is true, its a real SHAME for USA ........... I wd post my comments later. Want to see what other VJers has to comment about this.

________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________

Can your name keep you from getting hired?

These job seekers think their unusual names are getting in the way of their job search.

By Jessica Dickler, CNNMoney.com staff writer

August 27, 2009: 12:01 PM ET

Glenn Miller is tired of fielding jokes about the great American jazz musician.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- For job hunters, that very first line on your résumé can influence potential employers. Just ask Glenn Miller.

Miller, 56, was out of work for about four months earlier in the year. On every interview he went on, the senior software engineer had to field jokes about his namesake, the great American jazz musician.

"They say, where's your band? And I say, they're all dead."

Even though Miller became adept at responding with witty one-liners, "it changes the tenor of the interview to have that opening dialog ... I think it makes people not take me seriously," he admitted.

For other job seekers, it's no laughing matter.

Colleen Rzucidlo, 27, has been actively looking for a public relations job for about nine months, but believes her hard-to-pronounce surname has hurt her chances of landing a position.

"While I certainly can't prove it, I often wonder if my last name hinders me when it comes to the job search process," she said. "Nobody knows how to say it -- that's a turn off. If they can't say my name they are not going to bother reading my résumé."

Of course, considering someone's name as part of the decision-making process is not only wrong but illegal, says San Diego State University Human Resources Professor Christine Probett. "Discrimination of those sorts are well protected under the law," she said.

But that doesn't mean it's not happening.

For example, résumés with white-sounding names have a 50% greater chance of receiving a callback when compared to those with African American names, according to a study performed for the National Bureau of Economic Research by the University of Chicago's Marianne Bertrand and Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sendhil Mullaina.

Many job seekers agree. Nakores Sameita, 26, believes her ethnic-sounding name works against her. The former credit analyst for Chrysler was laid off in June and recently decided to go back to school for a masters in finance because her job search has been fruitless.

Hiring managers often question her immigration status, Sameita said. "I've had a couple of interviews and the first thing they mention is my name and ask me where I'm from," says the Kansas City resident, originally from Kenya. "Even though I'm a citizen it puts me at a disadvantage," she said.

Recruiters say that an applicant's name has no bearing on their chances of getting hired, and many states require employers to establish and enforce anti-discrimination policies.

"As a recruiter, the name is usually the last thing I look at," said Thad Schiele. "My job is to get the hiring manager the best candidates for a position."

But cynics suggest that if résumés can be scanned for appropriate terms and keywords, then someone's name could also play a role in the initial screening process, whether consciously or unconsciously.

While hiring managers may not intend to discriminate a candidate based on a name or ethnicity, the name could still signal something about the applicant's skills or background that is relevant to the job.

Duram Gallegos, 25, believes that potential employers call him assuming he speaks fluent Spanish because of his name.

Gallegos has been looking for a job near his home in Elgin, Ill. for six months and thinks his last name gives hiring managers a false impression that he can't back up in an interview.

If a job seeker does feel that their first name conveys an image they are uncomfortable with, then they could just use their first initial on a job application or résumé, Probett of San Diego State University suggested. But deemphasizing a last name is obviously not realistic.

Instead, job seekers should focus more on the aspects of their image that they can control, Probett said, like their online presence or the email address they use for correspondence.

"For example, 'PartyDude@BeerU.Com' might project an image of someone who is not too business savvy," she said.

AOS
Married: June 9, 2008.
Visa expired : June 12, 2008
Filed for AOS . Sent through USPS Priority Express : March 03, 2009
Package Delieverd at USCIS: March 05, 2009
March 13, 2009 : Checks Cashed
March 13, 2009 : NOA 1 received on I-485, I-130, I-765. Dated March 11th, 09
March 17, 2009 : Biometrics Letter recieved (Dated 13th March). Interview on 1st week of April
April 2, 2009 : Biometrics done. Total time taken with wait 20 mins.
April 22, 2009 : Called USCIS. They have received fingerprints and work permit is in process.
May 7, 2009 : I-765 case online. Card Production ordered.
May 11,2009 : EAD card received.
May 12,2009 : Applied for SSN.
May 18,2009 : Received SS card.
June 08,2009 : Received Letter for Interview ( scheduled on July 14 th July )
July 14th : Great Interview. All done in 20 mins.
July 18th: Online status - Card Production ordered. Thank God !! I-130 online status : Pending
July 23rd : Welcome to USA & I-130 approval letter recieved. Online status still shows pending.
July 31st : Received conditional green card
Removing Condition
3/25/11 - Received reminder from USCIS to file for ROC
5/6/11 - Sent I-751 Packet to CSC via usps
5/9/11- Package delivered to csc.
5/11/11- Check cashed electronically by CSC
5/16/11- NOA 1 received
5/27/11 - Biometrics letter received.Scheduled on 06/06/11. Case Online
6/6/11 - Biometrics done
9/6/11 - Approved.Card Production Ordered
9/12/11- Card Received

Citizenship

10/13/15 : Sent N400

10/16/15 : NOA

11/13/15 : Fingerprints

11/17/15 : In Line for Interview

01/11/16 : Interview- Passed & Given Oath letter & Date by hand

01/14/16 : Oath Ceremony done & Naturalization Certificate in hand.Proud citizen of USA

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happens elsewhere too

i.e. Australia http://news.anu.edu.au/?p=1317

DCF Timeline here

POE Timeline

08/24/2008 POE Seattle

08/29/2008 SSN assigned

09/08/2008 SSN (Card) received

09/29/2008 Green Card received

I-90 Timeline (USCIS error)

11/10/2008 Send I-90 to Texas service center

12/xx/2008 NOA1

01/07/2009 Card production ordered

01/14/2009 Card mailed

01/xx/2009 Card received

I-751 Timeline

06/02/2010 Send I-751 to California service center

06/04/2010 Received at CSC

06/07/2010 NOA1

06/09/2010 Check cashed

07/27/2010 Biometrics

07/28/2010 Touch

09/02/2010 Approved

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Filed: Lift. Cond. (pnd) Country: India
Timeline
happens elsewhere too

i.e. Australia http://news.anu.edu.au/?p=1317

we need to talk only about USA , its not a pride for Australia too ............. !!

AOS
Married: June 9, 2008.
Visa expired : June 12, 2008
Filed for AOS . Sent through USPS Priority Express : March 03, 2009
Package Delieverd at USCIS: March 05, 2009
March 13, 2009 : Checks Cashed
March 13, 2009 : NOA 1 received on I-485, I-130, I-765. Dated March 11th, 09
March 17, 2009 : Biometrics Letter recieved (Dated 13th March). Interview on 1st week of April
April 2, 2009 : Biometrics done. Total time taken with wait 20 mins.
April 22, 2009 : Called USCIS. They have received fingerprints and work permit is in process.
May 7, 2009 : I-765 case online. Card Production ordered.
May 11,2009 : EAD card received.
May 12,2009 : Applied for SSN.
May 18,2009 : Received SS card.
June 08,2009 : Received Letter for Interview ( scheduled on July 14 th July )
July 14th : Great Interview. All done in 20 mins.
July 18th: Online status - Card Production ordered. Thank God !! I-130 online status : Pending
July 23rd : Welcome to USA & I-130 approval letter recieved. Online status still shows pending.
July 31st : Received conditional green card
Removing Condition
3/25/11 - Received reminder from USCIS to file for ROC
5/6/11 - Sent I-751 Packet to CSC via usps
5/9/11- Package delivered to csc.
5/11/11- Check cashed electronically by CSC
5/16/11- NOA 1 received
5/27/11 - Biometrics letter received.Scheduled on 06/06/11. Case Online
6/6/11 - Biometrics done
9/6/11 - Approved.Card Production Ordered
9/12/11- Card Received

Citizenship

10/13/15 : Sent N400

10/16/15 : NOA

11/13/15 : Fingerprints

11/17/15 : In Line for Interview

01/11/16 : Interview- Passed & Given Oath letter & Date by hand

01/14/16 : Oath Ceremony done & Naturalization Certificate in hand.Proud citizen of USA

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I'm completely unsurprised. People discriminate based on all kinds of things, whether they're conscious of it or not. Even people with the best of intentions. When you're faced with multiple resumes or applications for a job, you make quick decisions on who you want to interview and who you don't. Am I saying it's right? No. But those in charge of hiring make their initial decisions on who to interview based on who they "think" they want or are going to get. Everyone has prior experiences and possibly prejudices that influence their decision making, so they go with those who they think will fit the person they are looking for, based on those prior experiences. (or preconceived notions)

People do treat you differently just because of your name. I have a difficult first and last name to pronounce (even after marriage). People act like you're imposing on them if you correct them, like I'm the one that did something wrong by having a "different" name. The fact of the matter is that if they just took the time to read the letters in order instead of making assumptions about what they think my name should be, there would be no problem at all. Many people are lazy. They're willing to overlook or dismiss you just because your name is too hard for them to get their brains around.

24q38dy.jpg
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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Vietnam
Timeline

Is anyone actually surprised that some people judge others by how their name appears or sounds?

This occurs throughout the globe.

I-864 Affidavit of Support FAQ -->> https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/immigrate/immigrant-process/documents/support/i-864-frequently-asked-questions.html

FOREIGN INCOME REPORTING & TAX FILING -->> https://www.irs.gov/publications/p54/ch01.html#en_US_2015_publink100047318

CALL THIS NUMBER TO ORDER IRS TAX TRANSCRIPTS >> 800-908-9946

PLEASE READ THE GUIDES -->> Link to Visa Journey Guides

MULTI ENTRY SPOUSE VISA TO VN -->>Link to Visa Exemption for Vietnamese Residents Overseas & Their Spouses

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ecuador
Timeline
Is anyone actually surprised that some people judge others by how their name appears or sounds?
No, man.
This occurs throughout the globe.
Si, man.

06-04-2007 = TSC stamps postal return-receipt for I-129f.

06-11-2007 = NOA1 date (unknown to me).

07-20-2007 = Phoned Immigration Officer; got WAC#; where's NOA1?

09-25-2007 = Touch (first-ever).

09-28-2007 = NOA1, 23 days after their 45-day promise to send it (grrrr).

10-20 & 11-14-2007 = Phoned ImmOffs; "still pending."

12-11-2007 = 180 days; file is "between workstations, may be early Jan."; touches 12/11 & 12/12.

12-18-2007 = Call; file is with Division 9 ofcr. (bckgrnd check); e-prompt to shake it; touch.

12-19-2007 = NOA2 by e-mail & web, dated 12-18-07 (187 days; 201 per VJ); in mail 12/24/07.

01-09-2008 = File from USCIS to NVC, 1-4-08; NVC creates file, 1/15/08; to consulate 1/16/08.

01-23-2008 = Consulate gets file; outdated Packet 4 mailed to fiancee 1/27/08; rec'd 3/3/08.

04-29-2008 = Fiancee's 4-min. consular interview, 8:30 a.m.; much evidence brought but not allowed to be presented (consul: "More proof! Second interview! Bring your fiance!").

05-05-2008 = Infuriating $12 call to non-English-speaking consulate appointment-setter.

05-06-2008 = Better $12 call to English-speaker; "joint" interview date 6/30/08 (my selection).

06-30-2008 = Stokes Interrogations w/Ecuadorian (not USC); "wait 2 weeks; we'll mail her."

07-2008 = Daily calls to DOS: "currently processing"; 8/05 = Phoned consulate, got Section Chief; wrote him.

08-07-08 = E-mail from consulate, promising to issue visa "as soon as we get her passport" (on 8/12, per DHL).

08-27-08 = Phoned consulate (they "couldn't find" our file); visa DHL'd 8/28; in hand 9/1; through POE on 10/9 with NO hassles(!).

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Was interviewed before and was told that they couldn't do a background check on me because my former employer is on the other side of the globe and there is no way they can get in touch with my former employer. Duh? It goes without saying that the recruiter is a total idiot.

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hahaha have they not heard of email? :lol:

DCF Timeline here

POE Timeline

08/24/2008 POE Seattle

08/29/2008 SSN assigned

09/08/2008 SSN (Card) received

09/29/2008 Green Card received

I-90 Timeline (USCIS error)

11/10/2008 Send I-90 to Texas service center

12/xx/2008 NOA1

01/07/2009 Card production ordered

01/14/2009 Card mailed

01/xx/2009 Card received

I-751 Timeline

06/02/2010 Send I-751 to California service center

06/04/2010 Received at CSC

06/07/2010 NOA1

06/09/2010 Check cashed

07/27/2010 Biometrics

07/28/2010 Touch

09/02/2010 Approved

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Huh !! Read this !! Shame on USA !!

Found this at this CNN MONEY Link

Even if 1% of this news is true, its a real SHAME for USA ........... I wd post my comments later. Want to see what other VJers has to comment about this.

________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________

Can your name keep you from getting hired?

These job seekers think their unusual names are getting in the way of their job search.

By Jessica Dickler, CNNMoney.com staff writer

August 27, 2009: 12:01 PM ET

Glenn Miller is tired of fielding jokes about the great American jazz musician.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- For job hunters, that very first line on your résumé can influence potential employers. Just ask Glenn Miller.

Miller, 56, was out of work for about four months earlier in the year. On every interview he went on, the senior software engineer had to field jokes about his namesake, the great American jazz musician.

"They say, where's your band? And I say, they're all dead."

Even though Miller became adept at responding with witty one-liners, "it changes the tenor of the interview to have that opening dialog ... I think it makes people not take me seriously," he admitted.

For other job seekers, it's no laughing matter.

Colleen Rzucidlo, 27, has been actively looking for a public relations job for about nine months, but believes her hard-to-pronounce surname has hurt her chances of landing a position.

"While I certainly can't prove it, I often wonder if my last name hinders me when it comes to the job search process," she said. "Nobody knows how to say it -- that's a turn off. If they can't say my name they are not going to bother reading my résumé."

Of course, considering someone's name as part of the decision-making process is not only wrong but illegal, says San Diego State University Human Resources Professor Christine Probett. "Discrimination of those sorts are well protected under the law," she said.

But that doesn't mean it's not happening.

For example, résumés with white-sounding names have a 50% greater chance of receiving a callback when compared to those with African American names, according to a study performed for the National Bureau of Economic Research by the University of Chicago's Marianne Bertrand and Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sendhil Mullaina.

Many job seekers agree. Nakores Sameita, 26, believes her ethnic-sounding name works against her. The former credit analyst for Chrysler was laid off in June and recently decided to go back to school for a masters in finance because her job search has been fruitless.

Hiring managers often question her immigration status, Sameita said. "I've had a couple of interviews and the first thing they mention is my name and ask me where I'm from," says the Kansas City resident, originally from Kenya. "Even though I'm a citizen it puts me at a disadvantage," she said.

Recruiters say that an applicant's name has no bearing on their chances of getting hired, and many states require employers to establish and enforce anti-discrimination policies.

"As a recruiter, the name is usually the last thing I look at," said Thad Schiele. "My job is to get the hiring manager the best candidates for a position."

But cynics suggest that if résumés can be scanned for appropriate terms and keywords, then someone's name could also play a role in the initial screening process, whether consciously or unconsciously.

While hiring managers may not intend to discriminate a candidate based on a name or ethnicity, the name could still signal something about the applicant's skills or background that is relevant to the job.

Duram Gallegos, 25, believes that potential employers call him assuming he speaks fluent Spanish because of his name.

Gallegos has been looking for a job near his home in Elgin, Ill. for six months and thinks his last name gives hiring managers a false impression that he can't back up in an interview.

If a job seeker does feel that their first name conveys an image they are uncomfortable with, then they could just use their first initial on a job application or résumé, Probett of San Diego State University suggested. But deemphasizing a last name is obviously not realistic.

Instead, job seekers should focus more on the aspects of their image that they can control, Probett said, like their online presence or the email address they use for correspondence.

"For example, 'PartyDude@BeerU.Com' might project an image of someone who is not too business savvy," she said.

If you think the USA is a real SHAME then why do you want anything to do with coming here to then USA?? You must be a scammer?

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Huh !! Read this !! Shame on USA !!

Found this at this CNN MONEY Link

Even if 1% of this news is true, its a real SHAME for USA ........... I wd post my comments later. Want to see what other VJers has to comment about this.

________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________

Can your name keep you from getting hired?

These job seekers think their unusual names are getting in the way of their job search.

By Jessica Dickler, CNNMoney.com staff writer

August 27, 2009: 12:01 PM ET

Glenn Miller is tired of fielding jokes about the great American jazz musician.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- For job hunters, that very first line on your résumé can influence potential employers. Just ask Glenn Miller.

Miller, 56, was out of work for about four months earlier in the year. On every interview he went on, the senior software engineer had to field jokes about his namesake, the great American jazz musician.

"They say, where's your band? And I say, they're all dead."

Even though Miller became adept at responding with witty one-liners, "it changes the tenor of the interview to have that opening dialog ... I think it makes people not take me seriously," he admitted.

For other job seekers, it's no laughing matter.

Colleen Rzucidlo, 27, has been actively looking for a public relations job for about nine months, but believes her hard-to-pronounce surname has hurt her chances of landing a position.

"While I certainly can't prove it, I often wonder if my last name hinders me when it comes to the job search process," she said. "Nobody knows how to say it -- that's a turn off. If they can't say my name they are not going to bother reading my résumé."

Of course, considering someone's name as part of the decision-making process is not only wrong but illegal, says San Diego State University Human Resources Professor Christine Probett. "Discrimination of those sorts are well protected under the law," she said.

But that doesn't mean it's not happening.

For example, résumés with white-sounding names have a 50% greater chance of receiving a callback when compared to those with African American names, according to a study performed for the National Bureau of Economic Research by the University of Chicago's Marianne Bertrand and Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Sendhil Mullaina.

Many job seekers agree. Nakores Sameita, 26, believes her ethnic-sounding name works against her. The former credit analyst for Chrysler was laid off in June and recently decided to go back to school for a masters in finance because her job search has been fruitless.

Hiring managers often question her immigration status, Sameita said. "I've had a couple of interviews and the first thing they mention is my name and ask me where I'm from," says the Kansas City resident, originally from Kenya. "Even though I'm a citizen it puts me at a disadvantage," she said.

Recruiters say that an applicant's name has no bearing on their chances of getting hired, and many states require employers to establish and enforce anti-discrimination policies.

"As a recruiter, the name is usually the last thing I look at," said Thad Schiele. "My job is to get the hiring manager the best candidates for a position."

But cynics suggest that if résumés can be scanned for appropriate terms and keywords, then someone's name could also play a role in the initial screening process, whether consciously or unconsciously.

While hiring managers may not intend to discriminate a candidate based on a name or ethnicity, the name could still signal something about the applicant's skills or background that is relevant to the job.

Duram Gallegos, 25, believes that potential employers call him assuming he speaks fluent Spanish because of his name.

Gallegos has been looking for a job near his home in Elgin, Ill. for six months and thinks his last name gives hiring managers a false impression that he can't back up in an interview.

If a job seeker does feel that their first name conveys an image they are uncomfortable with, then they could just use their first initial on a job application or résumé, Probett of San Diego State University suggested. But deemphasizing a last name is obviously not realistic.

Instead, job seekers should focus more on the aspects of their image that they can control, Probett said, like their online presence or the email address they use for correspondence.

"For example, 'PartyDude@BeerU.Com' might project an image of someone who is not too business savvy," she said.

If you think the USA is a real SHAME then why do you want anything to do with coming here to then USA?? You must be a scammer?

:lol::devil: :devil: :devil: :devil:

N-400:
May 9, 2017: N-400 packet was sent
May 15, 2017: NOA1 
June 05, 2017: Biometric Done
June 19, 2017: Case is in Line for an Interview
June 25, 2018: USCIS Scheduled an Interview
Aug. 02, 2018: Interview Date- APPROVED!
Aug. 09, 2018: Oath Ceremony

My Group

My Blog

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I went to school with a girl named Penny Quarter... imagine how her interviews go..

Saw a guy on TV named ####### Hertz

youregonnalovemynutsf.jpg

"He always start the fire here in VJ thread and I believe all people will agree with me about it"

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I was WELL aware of this probably for the last ten years....I had a friend called Abena Ukonga who had finished her masters in business. She kept getting rejection letters. So, one day I convinced her to send two resumes that were EXACTLY the same, the 'two' candidates went to the same universities etc, only one was her real name and the other one was called Ellen Brown.

She was rejected and they asked 'Ellen Brown' in for an interview.

That made me decide to ensure my children's names bear no cultural identifiers.

Naturalization

Son's N-400 Timeline

08/14/2020 - Sent N-400 and I-912 waiver to TX lockbox

09/18/2020 - NOA via text

06/05/2021 - Notification of biometrics scheduled

09/17/2021 - Interview - decision cannot be made

11/24/2021 - Denial letter, 30 days to appeal

12/24/2021 - Appeal sent back with I-912 waiver

12/24/2021 - Motion to terminate deportation proceedings from 2013 filed

 

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline

If a firm will not interview you because they think you have a foreign sounding name, a 'non-white' name or a name that is hard to pronounce - are they not really doing you a favour - the upside here is that you don't ever have to meet them, let alone work with them every day!

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