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Zalman

Alien Status and US Military

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Filed: K-3 Visa Country: Spain
Timeline

Can a man from South Africa (some college) join the US Marines?

No Green Card

Pevious Student VISA in the USA (9 months)

No violations of any INS rules.....left the US on time

Currently working on a ship

Wishing to be in the US Military

Desires to eventually become a citizen

27 years old

No legal problems anywhere or any time

I had seen in LA and Texas some billboards in spanish that encourage young men to join the military and get legal status.

Does anyone know if a person without a green card and living outside the USA can join the Military?

Thanks in advance,

Zalman

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Philippines
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Can a non-U.S. Citizen join the United States Military?

By Rod Powers, About.com

See More About:enlistment qualification standardsnon citizen in the united states militaryQuestion: Can a non-U.S. Citizen join the United States Military?

Answer: Yes. A non-citizen can enlist in the military. However, federal law prohibits non-citizens from becoming commission or warrant officers.

In order for a non-citizen to enlist in the military, he/she must first be a legal immigrant (with a green card), permamently residing in the United States. It's important to note that the military cannot and will not assist in the immigration process. One must immigrate first, using normal immigration quotas and procedures, and -- once they've established an address in the United States -- they can find a recruiter's office and apply for enlistment.

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/joiningthem.../noncitizen.htm

Can Non-Citizens Join the Military?

Jeremy Derfner

Posted Friday, July 7, 2000, at 12:26 PM ET

During the July 4 Op Sail ceremonies in New York Harbor, President Clinton was introduced by a recently naturalized Honduran who serves in the U.S. Navy. How do non-citizens join the U.S. armed forces, and how many have?

Permanent residents are required to register with the Selective Service System and could be drafted were the draft reinstated. They may enlist in any of the military branches if they meet the requirements (i.e., age, height, health, moral character). The Marine Corps and the Navy can enlist non-citizens who don't have permanent-resident status, but they currently don't as a matter of policy. An obscure law allows the Navy to enlist 400 Filipinos a year.

Last year 8,465 non-citizens enlisted in the U.S. armed forces (4.6 percent of total enlistments). Currently, 28,591 non-citizens are on active duty (2.5 percent of active duty forces).

The rules for re-enlistment of permanent residents vary from military branch to military branch. The Air Force allows non-citizens to enlist for one term only; they must become citizens to re-enlist. The Army allows non-citizens to re-enlist and serve for a total of eight years. The Marine Corps and the Navy permit non-citizens to re-enlist indefinitely. However, non-citizens are limited to military occupations that do not require security clearance because of the difficulty of conducting background checks on them.

There is a long history of non-citizens' serving in the armed forces. Immigrants made up one quarter of the Union Army during the Civil War.

By enlisting in the armed forces, non-citizens can speed up the citizenship process. It usually takes five years for a permanent resident to become a citizen, but military personnel can become naturalized in only three years, or even less if they serve during wartime.

http://www.slate.com/id/1005634/

To

How to Join the Army as a Non-U.S. Citizen

By eHow Culture & Society Editor

The United States Military has been accepting legal residents into the armed forces since the Revolutionary War. Approximately 8,000 non-U.S. citizens also join the military every year. Some of the benefits provided by service members who are non-U.S. citizens are foreign language skills and cultural knowledge.

Step1Verify that you qualify. You cannot enlist in the U.S. Army if you are currently on contract with another military service. If you have served in the military of another country, you cannot enlist unless you can prove that you finished your service and that there is no chance for a recall.

Step2Document your status as a permanent resident of the United States. The army will accept non-U.S. citizens who have valid permanent residency cards in addition to other eligibility requirements. Your permanent residency card must have enough time on it for you to complete your enlistment.

Step3Meet the other eligibility requirements. You must be at least 17 but not over 42, have a high school diploma and have no more than two dependents under the age of 18. Single parents cannot join the military.

Step4Discover the enlistment term. The army restricts noncitizens to an 8-year service, which may be taken consecutively or not. After this time, non-U.S. service members must obtain citizenship to reenlist.

Step5Know your limits. Service members who are not U.S. citizens cannot become commissioned or warrant officers. These ranks require a security clearance which is only available to U.S. citizens.

Step6Examine the job descriptions. Non-U.S. citizens are restricted to jobs which do not require security clearances. These include such diverse positions as band member, diver, armor crewman, firefighter, machinist, journalist and mechanic.

Step7Learn the locations of jobs for which you qualify. Although non-U.S. citizens are eligible for jobs which do not require a security clearance, these jobs may be performed in areas which require a security clearance.

Step8Request a waiver if you want to join the army but are a citizen of, or have resided in, a country that is considered hostile by the United States. Your recruiter will provide information on these countries. Visit GoArmy.com to find a recruiter near you (see Resources below).

http://www.ehow.com/how_2248012_join-army-...us-citizen.html

Immigrants in the Military

The United States military is composed entirely of volunteers. Each branch (Army, Air Force, Navy, Coast Guard and Marines) have different requirements, but there are some standard requirements for all the branches. Only individuals who are U.S. citizens can become commissioned officers throughout the branches. Those who are considered U.S citizens also include citizens of Puerto Rico, the Northern Marianas Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Non-citizens are eligible to enlist in the military but not be commissioned. A non-citizen that is eligible must meet certain requirements: (1) Have an Alien Registration Receipt Card (stamped I-94 or I-551 Green card/INS Form 1-551), (2) Have a bona fide residence established, and (3) Have established a record of the U.S. as their home. Some non-citizens from countries with a reputation toward hostility toward the U.S. may also require a waiver. The federal government cannot petition on behalf of an illegal immigrant so that they can obtain legal status and be able to enlist. The illegal immigrant must go through the immigration process of the USCIS (previously known as the INS). Once the status of the illegal immigrant becomes legal they can go ahead and start the enlisting process. Another requirement is that the Green Card and/or visa must be valid for the entire period of their enlistment.

Being a U.S. citizen or legal immigrant only starts to fulfill a checklist of requirements to join the U.S. military. Applicants must pass a physical exam. The military will take only those in relatively good health, but in certain cases the military may make some exceptions for some conditions and issue a waiver. They must obtain a minimum score on the ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) test. Those entering any military branch must be a minimum of 17 years of age. Since at 17 the recruit is still considered a minor, the recruit’s parents or guardians must give authorization to enlist. The maximum age limit varies from branch so it is recommended to check with the recruiters. The number of dependents a potential recruit has is also another factor that is considered by all military branches. As a general rule, the Department of Defense does not allow an applicant that has more than two dependents to enlist in any branch. The U.S. military considers dependents to be: spouses, unmarried children under 18, unmarried adopted children under 18, stepchildren under 18 who reside at their home, and a parent or other individual who obtains more than half of their income from the applicant. At times, the military branches can override this requirement and issue a waiver but it is something that is not done often. The applicant must be able to show that they can meet their financial obligations for the waiver to be granted. For the most part, single parents are not allowed to join the military. The only exception is made by the Army National Guard and the State Adjutant General must grant the waiver.

Applicants wishing to become part of the U.S. military must meet minimal education requirements. The military branches usually require a high school diploma, but some exceptions are made. Each branch is only allowed to take a certain percentage of applicants without high school diplomas. However, this percentage is relatively small. In addition, those applicants without a high school diploma are required to score a minimum ASVAB score. Individuals who enlist and are non-citizens are limited to one service term. If non-citizens become U.S. citizens then they are permitted to reenlist. Once on active duty in the military, the process of going from a non-citizen to U.S. citizen can be expedited. Another thing to note is that non-citizens who enlist in the military will also have limited job choices. The Department of Defense (DOD) does not currently allow non-citizens in the military to take on job choices that require a security clearance. All branches of the U.S. military have slightly different requirements so check with the recruiters.

http://www.usimmigrationsupport.org/military.html


David & Lalai

th_ourweddingscrapbook-1.jpg

aneska1-3-1-1.gif

Greencard Received Date: July 3, 2009

Lifting of Conditions : March 18, 2011

I-751 Application Sent: April 23, 2011

Biometrics: June 9, 2011

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: China
Timeline
Can a non-U.S. Citizen join the United States Military?

By Rod Powers, About.com

See More About:enlistment qualification standardsnon citizen in the united states militaryQuestion: Can a non-U.S. Citizen join the United States Military?

Answer: Yes. A non-citizen can enlist in the military. However, federal law prohibits non-citizens from becoming commission or warrant officers.

In order for a non-citizen to enlist in the military, he/she must first be a legal immigrant (with a green card), permamently residing in the United States. It's important to note that the military cannot and will not assist in the immigration process. One must immigrate first, using normal immigration quotas and procedures, and -- once they've established an address in the United States -- they can find a recruiter's office and apply for enlistment.

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/joiningthem.../noncitizen.htm

Can Non-Citizens Join the Military?

Jeremy Derfner

Posted Friday, July 7, 2000, at 12:26 PM ET

During the July 4 Op Sail ceremonies in New York Harbor, President Clinton was introduced by a recently naturalized Honduran who serves in the U.S. Navy. How do non-citizens join the U.S. armed forces, and how many have?

Permanent residents are required to register with the Selective Service System and could be drafted were the draft reinstated. They may enlist in any of the military branches if they meet the requirements (i.e., age, height, health, moral character). The Marine Corps and the Navy can enlist non-citizens who don't have permanent-resident status, but they currently don't as a matter of policy. An obscure law allows the Navy to enlist 400 Filipinos a year.

Last year 8,465 non-citizens enlisted in the U.S. armed forces (4.6 percent of total enlistments). Currently, 28,591 non-citizens are on active duty (2.5 percent of active duty forces).

The rules for re-enlistment of permanent residents vary from military branch to military branch. The Air Force allows non-citizens to enlist for one term only; they must become citizens to re-enlist. The Army allows non-citizens to re-enlist and serve for a total of eight years. The Marine Corps and the Navy permit non-citizens to re-enlist indefinitely. However, non-citizens are limited to military occupations that do not require security clearance because of the difficulty of conducting background checks on them.

There is a long history of non-citizens' serving in the armed forces. Immigrants made up one quarter of the Union Army during the Civil War.

By enlisting in the armed forces, non-citizens can speed up the citizenship process. It usually takes five years for a permanent resident to become a citizen, but military personnel can become naturalized in only three years, or even less if they serve during wartime.

http://www.slate.com/id/1005634/

To

How to Join the Army as a Non-U.S. Citizen

By eHow Culture & Society Editor

The United States Military has been accepting legal residents into the armed forces since the Revolutionary War. Approximately 8,000 non-U.S. citizens also join the military every year. Some of the benefits provided by service members who are non-U.S. citizens are foreign language skills and cultural knowledge.

Step1Verify that you qualify. You cannot enlist in the U.S. Army if you are currently on contract with another military service. If you have served in the military of another country, you cannot enlist unless you can prove that you finished your service and that there is no chance for a recall.

Step2Document your status as a permanent resident of the United States. The army will accept non-U.S. citizens who have valid permanent residency cards in addition to other eligibility requirements. Your permanent residency card must have enough time on it for you to complete your enlistment.

Step3Meet the other eligibility requirements. You must be at least 17 but not over 42, have a high school diploma and have no more than two dependents under the age of 18. Single parents cannot join the military.

Step4Discover the enlistment term. The army restricts noncitizens to an 8-year service, which may be taken consecutively or not. After this time, non-U.S. service members must obtain citizenship to reenlist.

Step5Know your limits. Service members who are not U.S. citizens cannot become commissioned or warrant officers. These ranks require a security clearance which is only available to U.S. citizens.

Step6Examine the job descriptions. Non-U.S. citizens are restricted to jobs which do not require security clearances. These include such diverse positions as band member, diver, armor crewman, firefighter, machinist, journalist and mechanic.

Step7Learn the locations of jobs for which you qualify. Although non-U.S. citizens are eligible for jobs which do not require a security clearance, these jobs may be performed in areas which require a security clearance.

Step8Request a waiver if you want to join the army but are a citizen of, or have resided in, a country that is considered hostile by the United States. Your recruiter will provide information on these countries. Visit GoArmy.com to find a recruiter near you (see Resources below).

http://www.ehow.com/how_2248012_join-army-...us-citizen.html

Immigrants in the Military

The United States military is composed entirely of volunteers. Each branch (Army, Air Force, Navy, Coast Guard and Marines) have different requirements, but there are some standard requirements for all the branches. Only individuals who are U.S. citizens can become commissioned officers throughout the branches. Those who are considered U.S citizens also include citizens of Puerto Rico, the Northern Marianas Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Non-citizens are eligible to enlist in the military but not be commissioned. A non-citizen that is eligible must meet certain requirements: (1) Have an Alien Registration Receipt Card (stamped I-94 or I-551 Green card/INS Form 1-551), (2) Have a bona fide residence established, and (3) Have established a record of the U.S. as their home. Some non-citizens from countries with a reputation toward hostility toward the U.S. may also require a waiver. The federal government cannot petition on behalf of an illegal immigrant so that they can obtain legal status and be able to enlist. The illegal immigrant must go through the immigration process of the USCIS (previously known as the INS). Once the status of the illegal immigrant becomes legal they can go ahead and start the enlisting process. Another requirement is that the Green Card and/or visa must be valid for the entire period of their enlistment.

Being a U.S. citizen or legal immigrant only starts to fulfill a checklist of requirements to join the U.S. military. Applicants must pass a physical exam. The military will take only those in relatively good health, but in certain cases the military may make some exceptions for some conditions and issue a waiver. They must obtain a minimum score on the ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) test. Those entering any military branch must be a minimum of 17 years of age. Since at 17 the recruit is still considered a minor, the recruit’s parents or guardians must give authorization to enlist. The maximum age limit varies from branch so it is recommended to check with the recruiters. The number of dependents a potential recruit has is also another factor that is considered by all military branches. As a general rule, the Department of Defense does not allow an applicant that has more than two dependents to enlist in any branch. The U.S. military considers dependents to be: spouses, unmarried children under 18, unmarried adopted children under 18, stepchildren under 18 who reside at their home, and a parent or other individual who obtains more than half of their income from the applicant. At times, the military branches can override this requirement and issue a waiver but it is something that is not done often. The applicant must be able to show that they can meet their financial obligations for the waiver to be granted. For the most part, single parents are not allowed to join the military. The only exception is made by the Army National Guard and the State Adjutant General must grant the waiver.

Applicants wishing to become part of the U.S. military must meet minimal education requirements. The military branches usually require a high school diploma, but some exceptions are made. Each branch is only allowed to take a certain percentage of applicants without high school diplomas. However, this percentage is relatively small. In addition, those applicants without a high school diploma are required to score a minimum ASVAB score. Individuals who enlist and are non-citizens are limited to one service term. If non-citizens become U.S. citizens then they are permitted to reenlist. Once on active duty in the military, the process of going from a non-citizen to U.S. citizen can be expedited. Another thing to note is that non-citizens who enlist in the military will also have limited job choices. The Department of Defense (DOD) does not currently allow non-citizens in the military to take on job choices that require a security clearance. All branches of the U.S. military have slightly different requirements so check with the recruiters.

http://www.usimmigrationsupport.org/military.html

The OP in their question indicated that they do NOT have a green-card.

NO-Green-Card = NO Joining the military.

Millitary service is a shortcut to Citizenship, but if is NOT a route to permanent residence. You need to be a permanent resident of the USA FIRST before you can join the military.


OUR TIME LINE Please do a timeline it helps us all, thanks.

Is now a US Citizen immigration completed Jan 12, 2012.

1428954228.1592.1755425389.png

CHIN0001_zps9c01d045.gifCHIN0100_zps02549215.gifTAIW0001_zps9a9075f1.gifVIET0001_zps0a49d4a7.gif

Look here: A Candle for Love and China Family Visa Forums for Chinese/American relationship,

Visa issues, and lots of info about the Guangzhou and Hong Kong consulate.

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