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Saraswoti

visa for high risk pregnant for medical treatment

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I am US immigrant residing here since last six month. I would like to apply visa for my sister in law for delivery because she is diagnosed with triplate pregnancy in my home country. Doctors said they can not take risk for continuing trip late pregnancy so they are suggesting us to go to other country where technology is better and has greater chance of making baby and mother survive through this delivery process. I am looking for possibilities of bringing her in US. Kindly suggest visa process. 

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How pregnant is she? Airlines have policies about allowing pregnant women to fly as well. 

See this http://mommypoints.boardingarea.com/2015/06/29/airline-rules-for-traveling-while-pregnant/ - but even aside from how far along she is, the multiple pregnancy and complications may well mean some airlines will refuse to fly her.

 

 

Edited by SusieQQQ

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 But if she can fly, suggest you do a google search for B visa for medical treatment. It will come up with things like this (in addition to the usual requirements of proving ties to home country etc):

 

 

 

Visa applicants seeking medical treatment in the United States should present evidence from the suggested list below to help establish their eligibility for a visa. Such evidence by it self will not guarantee the issuance of a visa if the applicant is found to be otherwise ineligible.

 

Documents

It must be established that the treatment sought is unavailable in the home country, and is for a condition for which medical facilities in the United States hold out some hope of a cure. 

You must also go to a U.S. Embassy Panel Physician to determine whether the treatment is available in the home country or necessary to be done in the United States. 

 

A letter from your physician in your home country stating the diagnosis of your condition and what treatments will be necessary. 
 

A statement from the U.S. doctor or institution accepting the patient for the proposed medical treatment, an estimate of the total time and total cost of your treatment, including outpatient care if the applicant will not be able to return immediately to the home country. A letter from this facility may be sent to your doctor or to you. 
 

Evidence that you have been accepted for treatment at a licensed medical facility in the USA and that you have an appointment. 
 

Documentation of how all the anticipated costs will be met. You must establish that sufficient funds are available to pay for medical and living expenses during any period of treatment and convalescence in the United States. 

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48 minutes ago, cyberfx1024 said:

You probably won't get one unfortunately due to them not getting the answers they like. 

That more than likely they won't be able to get a visa for their sister just to have the baby in the USA. 

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I think the cost is going to be the part they dislike the most. If they have enough money to go through a triplet pregnancy and delivery (and subsequent NICU time) in the USA then they can afford this pretty much anywhere. 

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not going to be approved especially in time to deliver

to have medical treatment here, her doctor would have to send records to a physican in the US requesting opinion and treatment

many cases that can not be treated in a foreign country are seen in our major university hospitals (like difficult transplants) but it at the request of a foreign physican

and we all know immigration does not move fast these days --even takes long for expediate visa

her physican can ask for her and move the process through a hospital here but only if he deems it necessary for her life and/ or the lives of these babies

just coming to have a baby is what some illegals are doing to help establish a tie and possible later-on visa to live here (but some don't realize the American born child only can apply after reaching I believe 21 for his parents to immigrate)

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When by boyfriend was arriving in the US and was stopped by Border Control they were also stopping all late-term pregnancy women to ensure that they were not entering the US specifically to give birth since all children born in the US are automatically US Citizens and they are trying to cut down on this 'loophole' from what he overheard in the exchanges between Border Control and the 4 pregnant women in detention with him (3 of the women were denied entry).

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16 minutes ago, WhatLoveBuys said:

When by boyfriend was arriving in the US and was stopped by Border Control they were also stopping all late-term pregnancy women to ensure that they were not entering the US specifically to give birth since all children born in the US are automatically US Citizens and they are trying to cut down on this 'loophole' from what he overheard in the exchanges between Border Control and the 4 pregnant women in detention with him (3 of the women were denied entry).

It's hardly a loophole. The children born this way cannot bring parents or siblings into the country until they are adults. Sure, the kids are US citizens but that's pretty meaningless until they are independent adults as they cannot stay in the country all alone. I think the biggest concern is the ability to pay for the medical bills. My mother is a midwife in a high-risk unit in the U.K. Their biggest problem with "childbirth tourists" from developing countries is HIV. The women choose the U.K. In order to receive the anti-bodies. Another big concern is hepatitis, particularly among Chinese mothers-to-be. These are huge matters of concern when it comes to public health. 

 

Then again, the U.K. does not grant citizenship to babies born in the U.K. where the parents do not live in the U.K. 

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