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Destiny2000

Vehicle Related Question for Canadian Spouse's Car

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 My husband is Canadian and we are filing for his immigration while he is here in the US.
He drove here to Ohio and crossed in Detroit. His car is obviously Canadian as well, he is wondering what he should do about his vehicle. His Canadian plates don't expire until June of 2018 but he is concerned about what he has to do to make it legal here in the US. I told him I believed he just waited until everything was processed & he was given the correct form for travel. Am I right?

Thanks everyone, you've all been so helpful!!


 

♥ We met on a phone chat line December 1998

♥ Met in person June 1999

♥ Married September 2000

♥ I moved to Canada February 2001

♥ I moved back to Ohio April 2005

♥ Starting immigration process finally on September 30th 2017
♥ USCIS received all forms on October 6th 2017
♥ Hubby had biometric appointment on October 30th 2017
♥ Received RFE for I-485 on December 9th 2017

♥ EAD combo card received on February 9th 2018

AOS interview on February 15th 2018
♥ Residence card is being processed on February 22nd 2018
 

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I don't see how the expiration date of Canadian plates are relevant.  Each state has its own regulations regarding vehicle licensing....you should also think about insuring it in your state.

Edited by missileman

The most profound statement I have ever read is "What I am to be....I am now becoming"

 

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Well he purchased his car in Canada & I know if you bring one to the US to live you have to have it inspected and there is tax on it. We haven't sent our immigration papers in yet, we are doing that on 9/29/2017. I just didn't know if he'd get in any trouble having his car here.


 

♥ We met on a phone chat line December 1998

♥ Met in person June 1999

♥ Married September 2000

♥ I moved to Canada February 2001

♥ I moved back to Ohio April 2005

♥ Starting immigration process finally on September 30th 2017
♥ USCIS received all forms on October 6th 2017
♥ Hubby had biometric appointment on October 30th 2017
♥ Received RFE for I-485 on December 9th 2017

♥ EAD combo card received on February 9th 2018

AOS interview on February 15th 2018
♥ Residence card is being processed on February 22nd 2018
 

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Just now, Destiny2000 said:

Well he purchased his car in Canada & I know if you bring one to the US to live you have to have it inspected and there is tax on it. We haven't sent our immigration papers in yet, we are doing that on 9/29/2017. I just didn't know if he'd get in any trouble having his car here.

In some states, you MUST register your car within a few days or months.....better contact a state DMV for the accurate info.

Just now, Destiny2000 said:

Well he purchased his car in Canada & I know if you bring one to the US to live you have to have it inspected and there is tax on it. We haven't sent our immigration papers in yet, we are doing that on 9/29/2017. I just didn't know if he'd get in any trouble having his car here.

The answer is yes, if he is driving an uninsured car....


The most profound statement I have ever read is "What I am to be....I am now becoming"

 

  • Texas Service Center after transfer from Nebraska
  • Consulate :Taipei, Taiwan
  • Marriage: 7/30/2015
  • I-130 NOA1 : 4/27/2016
  • I-130 Approved :9/8/2016
  • Case received at NVC: 10/11/2016                               
  • Case # and IIN#: 10/24/2016
  • AOS Fee Invoiced:10/24/2016  
  • AOS Fee Paid:10/25/2016
  • IV Fee Invoiced:10/24/2016  
  • IV Fee Paid:10/25/2016
  • DS-260 Completed: 10/28/16
  • Scan Date:11/9/2016
  • Supervisor review: 12/21/16 
  • Checklist: 1/13/17 
  • Case Complete: 4/10/17
  • Interview Date: 5/8/17 
  • Visa  "ISSUED": 5/10/17
  • Visa and Passport in hand/Flight to USA Booked!!!: 5/12/17  
  • POE Dallas DFW on June 22, 2017
  • SS Card received : 7/3/2017
  • 2-year Green Card received in mail: 7/15/17
 

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He has insurance on the car, it's just from his Canadian insurance company.

Thank you and I'll contact Ohio DMV :)


 

♥ We met on a phone chat line December 1998

♥ Met in person June 1999

♥ Married September 2000

♥ I moved to Canada February 2001

♥ I moved back to Ohio April 2005

♥ Starting immigration process finally on September 30th 2017
♥ USCIS received all forms on October 6th 2017
♥ Hubby had biometric appointment on October 30th 2017
♥ Received RFE for I-485 on December 9th 2017

♥ EAD combo card received on February 9th 2018

AOS interview on February 15th 2018
♥ Residence card is being processed on February 22nd 2018
 

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Basically the easiest thing to do is to call the DMV. 

 

Theyll tell you the requirements for your state and answer any questions regarding insurance. Or you could both go to the DMV and ask the question in person, that's what I would do.

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New to Ohio?

You are considered a new resident of Ohio when you:

  • Begin working in the state.
  • Rent or buy a home.
  • Register to vote.
  • Enroll your children in an OH school.

Within 30 days of establishing residency, you'll need to title and register your car.

Edited by missileman

The most profound statement I have ever read is "What I am to be....I am now becoming"

 

  • Texas Service Center after transfer from Nebraska
  • Consulate :Taipei, Taiwan
  • Marriage: 7/30/2015
  • I-130 NOA1 : 4/27/2016
  • I-130 Approved :9/8/2016
  • Case received at NVC: 10/11/2016                               
  • Case # and IIN#: 10/24/2016
  • AOS Fee Invoiced:10/24/2016  
  • AOS Fee Paid:10/25/2016
  • IV Fee Invoiced:10/24/2016  
  • IV Fee Paid:10/25/2016
  • DS-260 Completed: 10/28/16
  • Scan Date:11/9/2016
  • Supervisor review: 12/21/16 
  • Checklist: 1/13/17 
  • Case Complete: 4/10/17
  • Interview Date: 5/8/17 
  • Visa  "ISSUED": 5/10/17
  • Visa and Passport in hand/Flight to USA Booked!!!: 5/12/17  
  • POE Dallas DFW on June 22, 2017
  • SS Card received : 7/3/2017
  • 2-year Green Card received in mail: 7/15/17
 

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~~moved to Canada regional forum from general immigration.  Question isn't about immigration but is about importing a Canadian car~~

 

His insurance likely isn't covering him moving to the USA.  He needs to go to the nearest CBP and import his car.  The main problem is he doesn't have a letter of compliance.  In Canada, newer cars aren't required to have TPMS while in the USA they are, and it's very expensive to put in.  Also if he has a lien or a loan on the car he could be violating that loan agreement and they can repo the car or demand full payment.  Generally speaking you can't import a car with a lien because you do not have the title. 

 

 

Edited by NikLR

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.  - Dr. Seuss

 

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Your insurance company will usually cover you for up to six months, as long as they know you're in the U.S.  But you need to confirm with them.  

 

However, as the link provided by Missleman shows, you need to register your vehicle in Ohio, which means importing it.  Contact the manufacturer and ask for a letter of compliance.  They can probably email you one.  Then go to a Port of Entry (border or airport) and tell them you want to import the vehicle.  The forms are available online.  They will stamp the form for you and you can then take that to the DMV and get a plate. 

 

In my case my compliance letter actually said my vehicle wasn't compliant.  It was a very minor issue and they let me import it anyway.  Also, there were no import fees.  I only had to pay the title and registration costs at the DMV.  I know we sometimes put things off because there's so much to deal with and everything seems like a hassle, but it's better to just get it done.

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Emissions depends on location.  For instance Colorado requires it but Tennessee doesn't. 

Edited by NikLR

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.  - Dr. Seuss

 

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6 minutes ago, NikLR said:

Emissions depends on location.  For instance Colorado requires it but Tennessee doesn't. 

Ah okay, I thought it was a federal deal. 

 

Thanks for the info :)

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Depending on the state, you may even be able to keep your car licensed for an entire year.... but you MUST have it imported properly. Most cars built in Canada meet the exact same emissions and safety standards as the US, so it's potentially easier to bring a Canadian built car than one from, say, Europe.

 

Although some states have different emissions guidelines, as far as I can tell, no matter where you import a car from Canada to the US, you MUST meet EPA standards. This may be a "better safe than sorry" by the CBP. If someone can confirm this is the case, that would be awesome, but I spoke to border crossings in both Manitoba and Ontario and this was the case.

 

To do so you will unfortunately have to drive the car to your nearest POE into the US, which can be quite a long drive, and provide one of the following:

  • Letter of compliance from your car's manufacturer (that shows it meets EPA + DOT emissions and safety standards)
  • Have it imported by a registered importer (much more expensive)

If the car is an import brand, you will likely have to pay a duty on it of up to 3% of the car's kelley blue book value. Roughly $200-500 for your average modern car at the border.

For domestics that also have US manufacturers, this is usually not the case.

 

The car must have been owned by you for 6 months and you must be importing it for personal use only (ie: not for resale).

 

If your car does not comply with the standards then you may be in trouble. You'll need to get it modified to meet those emissions and safety standards. This is especially the case with older cars, however more and more cars are meeting the "grandfathered in" program where you can have them imported through a registered importer even though they do not meet the standards. This will be just as costly.

 

Edited by Peot

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6 hours ago, Peot said:

Depending on the state, you may even be able to keep your car licensed for an entire year.... but you MUST have it imported properly. Most cars built in Canada meet the exact same emissions and safety standards as the US, so it's potentially easier to bring a Canadian built car than one from, say, Europe.

 

Although some states have different emissions guidelines, as far as I can tell, no matter where you import a car from Canada to the US, you MUST meet EPA standards. This may be a "better safe than sorry" by the CBP. If someone can confirm this is the case, that would be awesome, but I spoke to border crossings in both Manitoba and Ontario and this was the case.

 

To do so you will unfortunately have to drive the car to your nearest POE into the US, which can be quite a long drive, and provide one of the following:

  • Letter of compliance from your car's manufacturer (that shows it meets EPA + DOT emissions and safety standards)
  • Have it imported by a registered importer (much more expensive)

If the car is an import brand, you will likely have to pay a duty on it of up to 3% of the car's kelley blue book value. Roughly $200-500 for your average modern car at the border.

For domestics that also have US manufacturers, this is usually not the case.

 

The car must have been owned by you for 6 months and you must be importing it for personal use only (ie: not for resale).

 

If your car does not comply with the standards then you may be in trouble. You'll need to get it modified to meet those emissions and safety standards. This is especially the case with older cars, however more and more cars are meeting the "grandfathered in" program where you can have them imported through a registered importer even though they do not meet the standards. This will be just as costly.

 

We are in Ohio so I will check. 

Also, he owns the car & has the title.He does have Canadian Insurance on it so I will have him contact them as well.

The car is a 2012 Chevrolet Cruze.

Most important question though is....if he drives back to Detroit and imports it....won't they make him go back to Canada?? We aren't sending our papers in until Sept. 29th. Ugh. 


 

♥ We met on a phone chat line December 1998

♥ Met in person June 1999

♥ Married September 2000

♥ I moved to Canada February 2001

♥ I moved back to Ohio April 2005

♥ Starting immigration process finally on September 30th 2017
♥ USCIS received all forms on October 6th 2017
♥ Hubby had biometric appointment on October 30th 2017
♥ Received RFE for I-485 on December 9th 2017

♥ EAD combo card received on February 9th 2018

AOS interview on February 15th 2018
♥ Residence card is being processed on February 22nd 2018
 

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Wait until he has noa1 to at least to import the car.  At least at that point in time he will have authorized stay.  

Legally he has 1 year. The issue being state law (which I know lots of people ignore) but more importantly insurance coverage. 


You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.  - Dr. Seuss

 

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