Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rob L

GOP Lawmaker: KKK Grand Wizard Was 'One Of The South’s First Civil Rights Leaders'

12 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/andy-holt-tennessee-nathan-forrest

ByCAITLIN CRUZPublishedJULY 17, 2015, 5:01 PM EDT

Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, was "one of the South's first civil rights leaders," a GOP state representative from Tennessee wrote in an op-ed published Thursday.

Tennessee State Rep. Andy Holt ® said lawmakers were trying to "stoke the fires of racial tension in America" with claims against Forrest and by removing his remains from a Memphis park, according to his op-ed in The Jackson Sun, a newspaper in Jackson, Tenn.

Those that wish to stoke the fires of racial tension in America claim that Gen. Forrest was the founder of the “KKK.” This is not true. The Ku Klos of the mid-1860s was founded by Judge Thomas Jones, Frank McCord and several other Confederate veterans. Two years after its founding, Forrest was elected grand wizard of the organization. However, he never dressed in costume.

Holt cited a speech he said Forrest gave in 1875 at a Fourth of July barbecue for an early civil right organization in Memphis.

As Holt described it, Forrest accepted the speaking invitation and said, "Go to work, be industrious, live honestly and act truly, and when you are oppressed I’ll come to your relief.” Holt said the Confederate general’s speech was met by “a large crowd of blacks (who) roared with applause."

The Republican lawmaker said he would "continue to honor the life of General Forrest" because of his conscience and faith.

"The very idea of treating someone differently and not awarding them the same opportunities because of the color of their skin is absolutely disgusting. Were he alive today, Gen. Forrest would agree. In fact, Forrest was one of the South’s first civil rights leaders — a fact lost on many politicians looking to capitalize off the South Carolina tragedy."

Public officials have moved to take down Confederate flags and other symbols of the Confederacy following the deaths of nine black parishioners at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina. The suspect in the massacre is a 19-year-old white man who was photographed embracing the Confederate flag before the shooting.

Removing the Confederate symbol is a mistake, Holt wrote.

"Those interested in actually mending racial tension in Tennessee, rather than pandering for quick political points, should be singing the praises of Gen. Forrest. We should be teaching the story of Nathan B. Forrest to every last school child, not digging up his grave in an attempt to rewrite history."

Holt isn't the first Tennessee lawmaker to suggest removing symbols of the Confederacy would be wrong.

Republican Tennessee state Sen. John Stevens said this while he doesn't oppose removing Forrest's name from a city park, it could be a slippery slope.

"If people want to change the name of the park, change the name of the park. I'm certainly not going to defend Gen. Forrest. I just think it's a slippery slope when you start changing names and taking down statues," Stevens said. "What separates us from ISIS? Because that's what they do, they go around and tear down history in those nations that they've conquered. If that's what America is about now, then it concerns me."


The content available on a site dedicated to bringing folks to America should not be promoting racial discord, euro-supremacy, discrimination based on religion , exclusion of groups from immigration based on where they were born, disenfranchisement of voters rights based on how they might vote.

horsey-change.jpg?w=336&h=265

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/andy-holt-tennessee-nathan-forrest

ByCAITLIN CRUZPublishedJULY 17, 2015, 5:01 PM EDT

Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, was "one of the South's first civil rights leaders," a GOP state representative from Tennessee wrote in an op-ed published Thursday.

Tennessee State Rep. Andy Holt ® said lawmakers were trying to "stoke the fires of racial tension in America" with claims against Forrest and by removing his remains from a Memphis park, according to his op-ed in The Jackson Sun, a newspaper in Jackson, Tenn.

Those that wish to stoke the fires of racial tension in America claim that Gen. Forrest was the founder of the “KKK.” This is not true. The Ku Klos of the mid-1860s was founded by Judge Thomas Jones, Frank McCord and several other Confederate veterans. Two years after its founding, Forrest was elected grand wizard of the organization. However, he never dressed in costume.

Holt cited a speech he said Forrest gave in 1875 at a Fourth of July barbecue for an early civil right organization in Memphis.

As Holt described it, Forrest accepted the speaking invitation and said, "Go to work, be industrious, live honestly and act truly, and when you are oppressed I’ll come to your relief.” Holt said the Confederate general’s speech was met by “a large crowd of blacks (who) roared with applause."

The Republican lawmaker said he would "continue to honor the life of General Forrest" because of his conscience and faith.

"The very idea of treating someone differently and not awarding them the same opportunities because of the color of their skin is absolutely disgusting. Were he alive today, Gen. Forrest would agree. In fact, Forrest was one of the South’s first civil rights leaders — a fact lost on many politicians looking to capitalize off the South Carolina tragedy."

Public officials have moved to take down Confederate flags and other symbols of the Confederacy following the deaths of nine black parishioners at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina. The suspect in the massacre is a 19-year-old white man who was photographed embracing the Confederate flag before the shooting.

Removing the Confederate symbol is a mistake, Holt wrote.

"Those interested in actually mending racial tension in Tennessee, rather than pandering for quick political points, should be singing the praises of Gen. Forrest. We should be teaching the story of Nathan B. Forrest to every last school child, not digging up his grave in an attempt to rewrite history."

Holt isn't the first Tennessee lawmaker to suggest removing symbols of the Confederacy would be wrong.

Republican Tennessee state Sen. John Stevens said this while he doesn't oppose removing Forrest's name from a city park, it could be a slippery slope.

"If people want to change the name of the park, change the name of the park. I'm certainly not going to defend Gen. Forrest. I just think it's a slippery slope when you start changing names and taking down statues," Stevens said. "What separates us from ISIS? Because that's what they do, they go around and tear down history in those nations that they've conquered. If that's what America is about now, then it concerns me."

According to Wills, in the August 1867 state elections the Klan was relatively restrained in its actions. White Americans who made up the KKK hoped to persuade black voters that a return to their state of repression and slavery, as it existed before the war, was in their best interest. Forrest assisted in maintaining order. It was only after these efforts failed that Klan violence and intimidation escalated and became widespread.[53] Author Andrew Ward, however, writes, "In the spring of 1867, Forrest and his dragoons launched a campaign of midnight parades; 'ghost' masquerades; and 'whipping' and even 'killing Negro voters and white Republicans, to scare blacks off voting and running for office.'"[54]

It's never too late to do the right thing, but at least own up to your own misdeeds.


“Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.” – Coretta Scott King

"Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge." -Toni Morrison

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

President-Obama-jpg.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to Wills, in the August 1867 state elections the Klan was relatively restrained in its actions. White Americans who made up the KKK hoped to persuade black voters that a return to their state of repression and slavery, as it existed before the war, was in their best interest. Forrest assisted in maintaining order. It was only after these efforts failed that Klan violence and intimidation escalated and became widespread.[53] Author Andrew Ward, however, writes, "In the spring of 1867, Forrest and his dragoons launched a campaign of midnight parades; 'ghost' masquerades; and 'whipping' and even 'killing Negro voters and white Republicans, to scare blacks off voting and running for office.'"[54]

It's never too late to do the right thing, but at least own up to your own misdeeds.

Can I try to do some hoo do bait and switch to try to talk about a good and Noble purpose for the klan like you do the Panthers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I try to do some hoo do bait and switch to try to talk about a good and Noble purpose for the klan like you do the Panthers

If you're feeling squirrely, go head and jump :devil:


“Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.” – Coretta Scott King

"Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge." -Toni Morrison

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

President-Obama-jpg.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not unike the new voting laws in North Carolina..

According to Wills, in the August 1867 state elections the Klan was relatively restrained in its actions. White Americans who made up the KKK hoped to persuade black voters that a return to their state of repression and slavery, as it existed before the war, was in their best interest. Forrest assisted in maintaining order. It was only after these efforts failed that Klan violence and intimidation escalated and became widespread.[53] Author Andrew Ward, however, writes, "In the spring of 1867, Forrest and his dragoons launched a campaign of midnight parades; 'ghost' masquerades; and 'whipping' and even 'killing Negro voters and white Republicans, to scare blacks off voting and running for office.'"[54]

It's never too late to do the right thing, but at least own up to your own misdeeds.


200px-FSM_Logo.svg.png


www.ffrf.org




Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/andy-holt-tennessee-nathan-forrest

ByCAITLIN CRUZPublishedJULY 17, 2015, 5:01 PM EDT

Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, was "one of the South's first civil rights leaders," a GOP state representative from Tennessee wrote in an op-ed published Thursday.

Tennessee State Rep. Andy Holt ® said lawmakers were trying to "stoke the fires of racial tension in America" with claims against Forrest and by removing his remains from a Memphis park, according to his op-ed in The Jackson Sun, a newspaper in Jackson, Tenn.

Those that wish to stoke the fires of racial tension in America claim that Gen. Forrest was the founder of the KKK. This is not true. The Ku Klos of the mid-1860s was founded by Judge Thomas Jones, Frank McCord and several other Confederate veterans. Two years after its founding, Forrest was elected grand wizard of the organization. However, he never dressed in costume.

Holt cited a speech he said Forrest gave in 1875 at a Fourth of July barbecue for an early civil right organization in Memphis.

As Holt described it, Forrest accepted the speaking invitation and said, "Go to work, be industrious, live honestly and act truly, and when you are oppressed Ill come to your relief. Holt said the Confederate generals speech was met by a large crowd of blacks (who) roared with applause."

The Republican lawmaker said he would "continue to honor the life of General Forrest" because of his conscience and faith.

"The very idea of treating someone differently and not awarding them the same opportunities because of the color of their skin is absolutely disgusting. Were he alive today, Gen. Forrest would agree. In fact, Forrest was one of the Souths first civil rights leaders a fact lost on many politicians looking to capitalize off the South Carolina tragedy."

Public officials have moved to take down Confederate flags and other symbols of the Confederacy following the deaths of nine black parishioners at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina. The suspect in the massacre is a 19-year-old white man who was photographed embracing the Confederate flag before the shooting.

Removing the Confederate symbol is a mistake, Holt wrote.

"Those interested in actually mending racial tension in Tennessee, rather than pandering for quick political points, should be singing the praises of Gen. Forrest. We should be teaching the story of Nathan B. Forrest to every last school child, not digging up his grave in an attempt to rewrite history."

Holt isn't the first Tennessee lawmaker to suggest removing symbols of the Confederacy would be wrong.

Republican Tennessee state Sen. John Stevens said this while he doesn't oppose removing Forrest's name from a city park, it could be a slippery slope.

"If people want to change the name of the park, change the name of the park. I'm certainly not going to defend Gen. Forrest. I just think it's a slippery slope when you start changing names and taking down statues," Stevens said. "What separates us from ISIS? Because that's what they do, they go around and tear down history in those nations that they've conquered. If that's what America is about now, then it concerns me."

So Republicans are now trying to tell us that members of the KKK weren't really racists? Republican revisionism at its finest.

Oct 19, 2010 I-130 application submitted to US Embassy Seoul, South Korea

Oct 22, 2010 I-130 application approved

Oct 22, 2010 packet 3 received via email

Nov 15, 2010 DS-230 part 1 faxed to US Embassy Seoul

Nov 15, 2010 Appointment for visa interview made on-line

Nov 16, 2010 Confirmation of appointment received via email

Dec 13, 2010 Interview date

Dec 15, 2010 CR-1 received via courier

Mar 29, 2011 POE Detroit Michigan

Feb 15, 2012 Change of address via telephone

Jan 10, 2013 I-751 packet mailed to Vermont Service CenterJan 15, 2013 NOA1

Jan 31, 2013 Biometrics appointment letter received

Feb 20, 2013 Biometric appointment date

June 14, 2013 RFE

June 24, 2013 Responded to RFE

July 24, 2013 Removal of conditions approved

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are reading from the book of Mormon, from when the LDS church claimed they were against blacks in their clergy because they were not ready to undertake such responsibility. That was their position until 1976! No, not a typo. I meant 1976, as in the year of the bicentennial...

So Republicans are now trying to tell us that members of the KKK weren't really racists? Republican revisionism at its finest.


200px-FSM_Logo.svg.png


www.ffrf.org




Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Republicans are now trying to tell us that members of the KKK weren't really racists? Republican revisionism at its finest.

This happens on both sides, can you say Robert Byrd?


Visa Received : 2014-04-04 (K1 - see timeline for details)

US Entry : 2014-09-12

POE: Detroit

Marriage : 2014-09-27

I-765 Approved: 2015-01-09

I-485 Interview: 2015-03-11

I-485 Approved: 2015-03-13

Green Card Received: 2015-03-24 Yeah!!!

I-751 ROC Submitted: 2016-12-20

I-751 NOA Received:  2016-12-29

I-751 Biometrics Appt.:  2017-01-26

I-751 Interview:  2018-04-10

I-751 Approved:  2018-05-04

N400 Filed:  2018-01-13

N400 Biometrics:  2018-02-22

N400 Interview:  2018-04-10

N400 Approved:  2018-04-10

Oath Ceremony:  2018-06-11 - DONE!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This happens on both sides, can you say Robert Byrd?

History only counts for repubs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This happens on both sides, can you say Robert Byrd?

Okay, I get it. The standard is now what the other lot think they can get away with. Funnily enough, when I was a small child in school, and caught doing something I wasn't supposed to, my teachers never bought my defense that other children were also doing something similar, so therefore I wasn't at fault. Why do you think that was so?

Oct 19, 2010 I-130 application submitted to US Embassy Seoul, South Korea

Oct 22, 2010 I-130 application approved

Oct 22, 2010 packet 3 received via email

Nov 15, 2010 DS-230 part 1 faxed to US Embassy Seoul

Nov 15, 2010 Appointment for visa interview made on-line

Nov 16, 2010 Confirmation of appointment received via email

Dec 13, 2010 Interview date

Dec 15, 2010 CR-1 received via courier

Mar 29, 2011 POE Detroit Michigan

Feb 15, 2012 Change of address via telephone

Jan 10, 2013 I-751 packet mailed to Vermont Service CenterJan 15, 2013 NOA1

Jan 31, 2013 Biometrics appointment letter received

Feb 20, 2013 Biometric appointment date

June 14, 2013 RFE

June 24, 2013 Responded to RFE

July 24, 2013 Removal of conditions approved

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I get it. The standard is now what the other lot think they can get away with. Funnily enough, when I was a small child in school, and caught doing something I wasn't supposed to, my teachers never bought my defense that other children were also doing something similar, so therefore I wasn't at fault. Why do you think that was so?

I did not say two wrongs made a right. I was only pointing out the hippocracy in your statement. I do not condone any rewrite of history, and the world would be a much better place if people on both sides actually owned up to their responsibilities. The problem I see is that currently the major press only holds one side's feet to the fire, and any other press sources that tries to do it fairly is lambasted as being a mouthpiece for the other side. Whatever, the simple fact is that all the pols in Washington are guilty, and I for one don't believe a word that comes out of any of their mouths whether I agree with their spoken ideology or not.


Visa Received : 2014-04-04 (K1 - see timeline for details)

US Entry : 2014-09-12

POE: Detroit

Marriage : 2014-09-27

I-765 Approved: 2015-01-09

I-485 Interview: 2015-03-11

I-485 Approved: 2015-03-13

Green Card Received: 2015-03-24 Yeah!!!

I-751 ROC Submitted: 2016-12-20

I-751 NOA Received:  2016-12-29

I-751 Biometrics Appt.:  2017-01-26

I-751 Interview:  2018-04-10

I-751 Approved:  2018-05-04

N400 Filed:  2018-01-13

N400 Biometrics:  2018-02-22

N400 Interview:  2018-04-10

N400 Approved:  2018-04-10

Oath Ceremony:  2018-06-11 - DONE!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not say two wrongs made a right. I was only pointing out the hippocracy in your statement. I do not condone any rewrite of history, and the world would be a much better place if people on both sides actually owned up to their responsibilities. The problem I see is that currently the major press only holds one side's feet to the fire, and any other press sources that tries to do it fairly is lambasted as being a mouthpiece for the other side. Whatever, the simple fact is that all the pols in Washington are guilty, and I for one don't believe a word that comes out of any of their mouths whether I agree with their spoken ideology or not.

Eggactly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×