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Does this qualify as immigration fraud?

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1. There is a law that requires non-US citizens to file change of address form after moving. I learned about this after many years of living in the US. Furthermore, the "within 10 days" part evaded me. Either I missed it, or subsequently forgot - I don't remember.

I was moving a lot in the last few weeks prior to naturalization, but only filed one address change form. I wasn't in any trouble with the law and paid for accommodations with my credit card, so I was definitely "traceable" and not hiding. And, of course, I attended the interview and the final ceremony. However, I didn't list any of these address change failures in the papers (the N-400 and on the day of naturalization) since the "10 days" part evaded me, so I didn't realize I broke the law.

THEORETICALLY SPEAKING, can they frame this as immigration fraud and revoke my citizenship?

2. Is there a statute of limitation for this particular law?

Many thanks.

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No biggie


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Immigration fraud is when you lie to get an immigration benefit or when you lie on an immigration form (even if there is no resulting benefit). You didn't do either of these.

In future, file the AR11 when you move.

Edited by JimmyHou

For a review of each step of my N-400 naturalization process, from application to oath ceremony, please click here.

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I moved and didn't realize I had to do the sponsor's change of address form until a few months in (I had done the AR-11 for myself). When I sent it in, I was afraid of penalties - I got a notice from USCIS in the mail a week after saying they received it and that was it.

So, no big deal!

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One should report new address, but if law-abiding there is

no issue really

As per USCIS site on AR11: You do not need to include temporary addresses as long as you maintain your present address as your permanent residence and continue to receive mail there.

So if you are staying for a few days but continue to receive mails at your permanent residence, you should be fine

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1. There is a law that requires non-US citizens to file change of address form after moving. I learned about this after many years of living in the US. Furthermore, the "within 10 days" part evaded me. Either I missed it, or subsequently forgot - I don't remember.

I was moving a lot in the last few weeks prior to naturalization, but only filed one address change form. I wasn't in any trouble with the law and paid for accommodations with my credit card, so I was definitely "traceable" and not hiding. And, of course, I attended the interview and the final ceremony. However, I didn't list any of these address change failures in the papers (the N-400 and on the day of naturalization) since the "10 days" part evaded me, so I didn't realize I broke the law.

THEORETICALLY SPEAKING, can they frame this as immigration fraud and revoke my citizenship?

2. Is there a statute of limitation for this particular law?

Many thanks.

I moved 6 times for the past 5 years and never notified USCIS about the address changes. I became a US citizen last week - the issue of not filing AR-11 never came up during the interview so don't worry!

Best of luck!

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I've had a Green Card since 1976, and I've never filed this form. Maybe one day I'll be deported, but I very much doubt it will be because of this :blink:

I never file AR-11 I simply file with my current address at the time of application and they never question anything.

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