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cleverodra

Citizenship inquiry

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Dear all,

Currently, I hold temporary permanent residency based of marriage, and my ROC is coming up.

In addition, it is possible my husband (USC) will be offered a position outside of the U.S. and this post would be for 10-15 years.

I do not want to relinquish my PR, but since we will be living abroad we do not many options. We will keep our personal and credit accounts with a residential address in the U.S.

I just want to avoid potential CBP issues when coming back to the U.S. to visit our family.

Therefore, my option would be to file for citizenship based on my 3rd anniversary from PR date. However, if granted does this mean I am unable to voluntarily obtain any additional citizenships without relinquishing U.S. citizenship?

Kindly confirm

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US does not limit the number of Citizenships you can have.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Dear all,

I understand first I must first file for ROC before submitting my USC application (pending meeting the residency and character requirements, etc etc)

However, I would like to confirm if once I have successfully been granted US citizenship, it would prevent me from voluntary obtaining any future citizenship (U.K. French, Australian, etc).

Please confirm if there are any limitations once I have been granted USC.

Thank you.

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You can have as many citizenships as you want the US doesn't have a saying in that. as far as forthe expedite the 2yrs GC isn't going to work you need the 10yrs GC in order to be eligible. Once you have proof that you'll be abroad for work (In this case a travelling spouse) the 6 months period doesn't concern you anymore but you need to provide evidence to USCIS.


Marriage

06/20/2010: Met Online

09/05/2012: Marriage in Pretoria, South Africa

I-130

03/24/2013: Package I-130 was sent to Chicago Lockbox
04/01/2013: NOA1 Hard Copy
07/26/2013: Infopass
07/30/2013: RFE Received
08/05/2013: RFE Sent
05/01/2014: NOA2 Hard Copy

The process took almost 14 months (well ... that really sucks)

AOS

05/05/2014: Package I-485, I-765 and I-131 Sent
05/16/2014: NOA1 Hard Copy( I-765, I-485 )

05/28/2014: Biometric Appointment ( 15 days earlier than scheduled )

06/04/2014: RFE ( Sponsor's Proof of Employment )

06/06/2014: RFE Sent

07/30/2014: EAD/AP Received

09/23/2014: Interview

10/03/2014: Case Approved
10/09/2014: GC Received (10 YRS)

N-400

Qualified by 319b

05/02/2015: Fingerprints in the US embassy

05/04/2015: N-400 sent

05/19/2015: Cash checked

05/21/2015: NOA1

06/08/2015: In-Line for an Interview

07/21/2015: Interview

07/21/2015: Oath Ceremony ... I'm a U.S. Citizen

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There are no restrictions in terms of keeping your US citizenship if you later choose to get others. HOWEVER, other countries may have different restrictions- ie the may not give you an additional citizenship unless you renounce all others, including the US one.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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you could lose your US citizenship if you obtain another citizenship after getting the US citizenship

for more information see this link

http://travel.state.gov/content/travel/english/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/citizenship-and-dual-nationality.html


AOS

day 1 -- 04/11/2012-- package sent to Chicago

day 2 -- 04/12/2012-- package was received.

day 43-- 05/23/2012-- Notice for an interview is received for 06/26 @ 2pm

day 63-- 06/12/2012-- Received a Text & email for an update- Card production EAD/AP

day 77-- 06/26/2012-- interview / approved on the spot.

day 86-- 07/05/2012-- Received my GC in the mail.

ROC

day 1 -- 04/07/2014 -- ROC Package delivered to VSC

day 16 -- 04/23/2014 -- Walk-in Bio.

day 197 -- 10/20/2014-- Approval Letter received dated 10/16/2014

day 202 -- 10/25/2014-- GC received

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Nope

I know plenty of people who acquired other citizenship's, one guy is up to 5.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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you could lose your US citizenship if you obtain another citizenship after getting the US citizenship

for more information see this link

http://travel.state.gov/content/travel/english/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/citizenship-and-dual-nationality.html

This is correct. Acquiring a new nationality CAN result in loss of US citizenship "if performed voluntarily and with the intention of relinquishing U.S. nationality."

So the government would have to prove in court that when you acquired your new citizenship you intended to give up your U.S. citizenship. Note that they have to prove intent, not that you actually gave up your citizenship. This proof would not require a formal renunciation of citizenship and so the criteria is somewhat subjective. If you took an oath of allegiance to a foreign country, would that be enough? It's not clear.

Whatever the actual criteria is, this is something that is almost never (or perhaps never) enforced. It is extremely unlikely that you will lose your U.S. Citizenship unless you renounce it formally. For example, if you become a Japanese citizen, Japan would require you to formally renounce your U.S. Citizenship within 2 years of Japanese naturalization.

This is one of those provisions that the government would only use to get rid of someone they didn't want for other reasons. There's almost no chance that it'll affect you. It's similar to denaturalization for lying on the N400. If they suspect someone of committing a crime they can't prove (let's say they have evidence they can't submit in court for some reason), they can turn to USCIS and look through the N400. Then they find that you were a member of a high school band that you didn't list on the question about membership in clubs and organizations. Suddenly, you've lied on the application and you can be denaturalized. This is a silly example, I know, but it shows how it can work. There are many odd stories over the years about serious criminals who get their cases thrown out in court and soon after, very coincidentally, they are denaturalized and deported for lying on immigration forms.

So after all that, the answer is that the chance that you would lose US citizenship for acquiring another nationality is negligibly small. People get other nationalities all the time without any trouble.


For a review of each step of my N-400 naturalization process, from application to oath ceremony, please click here.

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