Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Not a Tailor

Mexican Supreme Court Legalizes Same-Sex Marriage

10 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

His church turned him away, his family discouraged him from a public fight and the government of the state where he lives vowed it would never happen.

But it did. Hiram Gonzalez married his boyfriend, Severiano Chavez, last year in the northern state of Chihuahua, which, like most Mexican states, technically allows marriage only between a man and a woman.

Mr. Gonzalez and dozens of other gay couples in recent months have, however, found a powerful ally: Mexico’s Supreme Court.

In ruling after ruling, the court has said that state laws restricting marriage to heterosexuals are discriminatory. Though the decisions have been made to little public fanfare, they have had the effect of legalizing gay marriage in Mexico without enshrining it in law.

“When I heard the judge pronounce us legally married, I burst into tears,” said Mr. Gonzalez, 41. Like nearly all same-sex couples marrying in Mexico, he and his partner needed a court order in order to exchange vows.

Continue reading the mai

As the United States awaits a landmark decision on gay marriageby the Supreme Court, the Mexican court’s rulings have added the country to a slowly growing list of Latin American nations permitting same-sex unions.

source

I'm sure that, like most countries, Mexico has a long way to go before full social acceptance and equality for same sex rights, but Mexico has beat the US to every citizen having access to same sex marriage (albeit, in Mexico's case, with an extra step for many same sex couples).

I thought America was meant to be the land of the free and the home of the brave? Seems more like the land of the handful of ruling free people and the home of the people who are too chicken to deal with change.

Edited by Not a Tailor

Met in 2010 on a forum for a mutual interest. Became friends.
2011: Realized we needed to evaluate our status as friends when we realized we were talking about raising children together.

2011/2012: Decided we were a couple sometime in, but no possibility of being together due to being same sex couple.

June 26, 2013: DOMA overturned. American married couples ALL have the same federal rights at last! We can be a family!

June-September, 2013: Discussion about being together begins.

November 13, 2013: Meet in person to see if this could work. It's perfect. We plan to elope to Boston, MA.

March 13, 2014 Married!

May 9, 2014: Petition mailed to USCIS

May 12, 2014: NOA1.
October 27, 2014: NOA2. (5 months, 2 weeks, 1 day after NOA1)
October 31, 2014: USCIS ships file to NVC (five days after NOA2) Happy Halloween for us!

November 18, 2014: NVC receives our case (22 days after NOA2)

December 17, 2014: NVC generates case number (50 days after NOA2)

December 19, 2014: Receive AOS bill, DS-261. Submit DS-261 (52 days after NOA2)

December 20, 2014: Pay AOS Fee

January 7, 2015: Receive, pay IV Fee

January 10, 2015: Complete DS-260

January 11, 2015: Send AOS package and Civil Documents
March 23, 2015: Case Complete at NVC. (70 days from when they received docs to CC)

May 6, 2015: Interview at Montréal APPROVED!

May 11, 2015: Visa in hand! One year less one day from NOA1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

source

I'm sure that, like most countries, Mexico has a long way to go before full social acceptance and equality for same sex rights, but Mexico has beat the US to every citizen having access to same sex marriage (albeit, in Mexico's case, with an extra step for many same sex couples).

I thought America was meant to be the land of the free and the home of the brave? Seems more like the land of the handful of ruling free people and the home of the people who are too chicken to deal with change.

You are joking right? You know this only extends to a very few protected classes.

I can't believe such a Catholic driven country could muster up the balls to make such a decision.

You know what the problem in the U.S. is? We are lacking balls and vaginas to make tough decisions, for lack of better words. I feel you girl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mexico is such a world leader.

Legal age of consent is age 12

This is the country that invented the Donkey show

Go take a trip around a border town or go visit Boy's Town, Prostitution all over the place and cheap.

Yes, Mexico is quite progressive....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are joking right? You know this only extends to a very few protected classes.

I can't believe such a Catholic driven country could muster up the balls to make such a decision.

You know what the problem in the U.S. is? We are lacking balls and vaginas to make tough decisions, for lack of better words. I feel you girl.

Oh, I know that America is one of the most ridiculously economically stratified countries that makes the list of 'developed' nations. I just don't get how heads don't explode from the cognitive dissonance where they call themselves the 'land of the free and the home of the brave' while being a bunch of quivering little babies shaking in their boots at the idea that people might achieve some modicum of equality.

Mexico is such a world leader.

Legal age of consent is age 12

This is the country that invented the Donkey show

Go take a trip around a border town or go visit Boy's Town, Prostitution all over the place and cheap.

Yes, Mexico is quite progressive....

And in spite of all that, they've just beat the US in an area of human rights that the US has been hemming and hawing over for my entire life. Aren't you ashamed of your country right now, lagging behind the land of donkey shows?


Met in 2010 on a forum for a mutual interest. Became friends.
2011: Realized we needed to evaluate our status as friends when we realized we were talking about raising children together.

2011/2012: Decided we were a couple sometime in, but no possibility of being together due to being same sex couple.

June 26, 2013: DOMA overturned. American married couples ALL have the same federal rights at last! We can be a family!

June-September, 2013: Discussion about being together begins.

November 13, 2013: Meet in person to see if this could work. It's perfect. We plan to elope to Boston, MA.

March 13, 2014 Married!

May 9, 2014: Petition mailed to USCIS

May 12, 2014: NOA1.
October 27, 2014: NOA2. (5 months, 2 weeks, 1 day after NOA1)
October 31, 2014: USCIS ships file to NVC (five days after NOA2) Happy Halloween for us!

November 18, 2014: NVC receives our case (22 days after NOA2)

December 17, 2014: NVC generates case number (50 days after NOA2)

December 19, 2014: Receive AOS bill, DS-261. Submit DS-261 (52 days after NOA2)

December 20, 2014: Pay AOS Fee

January 7, 2015: Receive, pay IV Fee

January 10, 2015: Complete DS-260

January 11, 2015: Send AOS package and Civil Documents
March 23, 2015: Case Complete at NVC. (70 days from when they received docs to CC)

May 6, 2015: Interview at Montréal APPROVED!

May 11, 2015: Visa in hand! One year less one day from NOA1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

source

I'm sure that, like most countries, Mexico has a long way to go before full social acceptance and equality for same sex rights, but Mexico has beat the US to every citizen having access to same sex marriage (albeit, in Mexico's case, with an extra step for many same sex couples).

I thought America was meant to be the land of the free and the home of the brave? Seems more like the land of the handful of ruling free people and the home of the people who are too chicken to deal with change.

How about just saying "Good job Mexico Supreme court!"


I don't believe it.. Prove it to me and I still won't believe it. -Ford Prefect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about just saying "Good job Mexico Supreme court!"

It'd be a lot easier if I weren't living in a state where my healthcare choices and my ability to make medical decisions for my wife literally depend on the US Supreme Court catching up to Mexico at the end of this month.


Met in 2010 on a forum for a mutual interest. Became friends.
2011: Realized we needed to evaluate our status as friends when we realized we were talking about raising children together.

2011/2012: Decided we were a couple sometime in, but no possibility of being together due to being same sex couple.

June 26, 2013: DOMA overturned. American married couples ALL have the same federal rights at last! We can be a family!

June-September, 2013: Discussion about being together begins.

November 13, 2013: Meet in person to see if this could work. It's perfect. We plan to elope to Boston, MA.

March 13, 2014 Married!

May 9, 2014: Petition mailed to USCIS

May 12, 2014: NOA1.
October 27, 2014: NOA2. (5 months, 2 weeks, 1 day after NOA1)
October 31, 2014: USCIS ships file to NVC (five days after NOA2) Happy Halloween for us!

November 18, 2014: NVC receives our case (22 days after NOA2)

December 17, 2014: NVC generates case number (50 days after NOA2)

December 19, 2014: Receive AOS bill, DS-261. Submit DS-261 (52 days after NOA2)

December 20, 2014: Pay AOS Fee

January 7, 2015: Receive, pay IV Fee

January 10, 2015: Complete DS-260

January 11, 2015: Send AOS package and Civil Documents
March 23, 2015: Case Complete at NVC. (70 days from when they received docs to CC)

May 6, 2015: Interview at Montréal APPROVED!

May 11, 2015: Visa in hand! One year less one day from NOA1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It'd be a lot easier if I weren't living in a state where my healthcare choices and my ability to make medical decisions for my wife literally depend on the US Supreme Court catching up to Mexico at the end of this month.

What I read was that 30 out of 31 states in Mexico ban gay marriage and the supreme court made a decision that makes those laws for practical purposes null and void. Somehow you got "progressive" out of that. We will get there with or without the supreme court - I would prefer we did it without the Supreme court as it shows we actually have progressed and reached that decision without it being forced down on us though I understand that sometimes that may be necessary.


I don't believe it.. Prove it to me and I still won't believe it. -Ford Prefect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I read was that 30 out of 31 states in Mexico ban gay marriage and the supreme court made a decision that makes those laws for practical purposes null and void. Somehow you got "progressive" out of that. We will get there with or without the supreme court - I would prefer we did it without the Supreme court as it shows we actually have progressed and reached that decision without it being forced down on us though I understand that sometimes that may be necessary.

It's not that it's a more progressive society. It's that their legal process has recognized, far before the US one, that human rights should NOT be determined by a majority vote. It's that simple. People voting on human rights issues is not a thing that should ever happen. Human rights should not be up to the popular vote because they're issues of rights and not issues of preference. People talk about gay marriage being 'forced' upon them. Who's holding a gun to anyone's head and saying 'you will get gay married now!'? No one is. All that's being 'forced' is human rights and, historically, it's a thing that has had to happen because, surprise surprise, those who are not affected by a human rights issue historically want to maintain the status quo.


Met in 2010 on a forum for a mutual interest. Became friends.
2011: Realized we needed to evaluate our status as friends when we realized we were talking about raising children together.

2011/2012: Decided we were a couple sometime in, but no possibility of being together due to being same sex couple.

June 26, 2013: DOMA overturned. American married couples ALL have the same federal rights at last! We can be a family!

June-September, 2013: Discussion about being together begins.

November 13, 2013: Meet in person to see if this could work. It's perfect. We plan to elope to Boston, MA.

March 13, 2014 Married!

May 9, 2014: Petition mailed to USCIS

May 12, 2014: NOA1.
October 27, 2014: NOA2. (5 months, 2 weeks, 1 day after NOA1)
October 31, 2014: USCIS ships file to NVC (five days after NOA2) Happy Halloween for us!

November 18, 2014: NVC receives our case (22 days after NOA2)

December 17, 2014: NVC generates case number (50 days after NOA2)

December 19, 2014: Receive AOS bill, DS-261. Submit DS-261 (52 days after NOA2)

December 20, 2014: Pay AOS Fee

January 7, 2015: Receive, pay IV Fee

January 10, 2015: Complete DS-260

January 11, 2015: Send AOS package and Civil Documents
March 23, 2015: Case Complete at NVC. (70 days from when they received docs to CC)

May 6, 2015: Interview at Montréal APPROVED!

May 11, 2015: Visa in hand! One year less one day from NOA1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

source

I thought America was meant to be the land of the free and the home of the brave? Seems more like the land of the handful of ruling free people and the home of the people who are too chicken to deal with change.

America was the land of the free before the rise of the American Taliban. Since, America has devolved to a place further back than Mexico.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×