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Asian Immigrants Becoming US Citizens at High Rate

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Asian Immigrants Becoming US Citizens at High Rate

by Elena Shore, New America Media/Huffington Post, June 2, 2015

04AFFIRM_SPAN-articleLarge-v2.jpg

image_(2).jpeg

For the first time in decades, the number of immigrants coming to the United States from China and India outnumbers those coming from Mexico. It's a historic shift that has caught the attention of service providers across the country working to help immigrants become U.S. citizens.

"We've seen a huge change in recent immigration," Jeanne Batalova, senior policy researcher at Migration Policy Institute, told reporters on a national press call Wednesday. The call was hosted by the New Americans Campaign, in collaboration with New America Media and the National Immigration Forum.

Of 1.2 million recent immigrants who came to the United States in 2013, 147,000 immigrants came from China, the leading country of origin, followed by 129,000 immigrants from India, and then 125,000 immigrants from Mexico.

Asian Americans also have among the highest naturalization rates in the United States: Less than half of all immigrants in the United States (47 percent) are naturalized U.S. citizens, while the percentage for Asian immigrants is significantly higher, at 59 percent. The proportion of naturalized U.S. citizens is highest for Vietnamese (76 percent) and Taiwanese (74 percent), followed by Filipinos (68 percent), Koreans (59 percent), Chinese (51 percent) and Indians (47 percent).

These numbers are high despite the fact that some countries, like China, still do not offer dual citizenship. Others, like the Philippines (in 2003) and South Korea (in 2010), have made changes to their dual citizenship requirements.

Yet even for those who do not have access to dual citizenship, the benefits of U.S. citizenship can be very attractive -- including security and protection from deportation, the ability to travel freely, the right to vote and run for political office, and the ability to sponsor a wider range of family members for immigration to the United States.

Citizenship also brings economic benefits, said Batalova. Studies show that naturalized citizens earn more than non-citizen counterparts, are less likely to be unemployed and are better represented in high-skilled jobs.

Still, many immigrants face barriers that can prevent them from becoming citizens, such as limited English proficiency or limited income, said Jannette Diep, executive director of Boat People SOS-Houston. Boat People SOS is part of the New Americans Campaign, a national coalition of over 100 organizations that helps immigrants overcome these barriers to make citizenship more accessible. For example, the campaign offers free workshops to help people apply for citizenship, provides English language and civics classes, and helps people apply for fee waivers if they can't afford the $680 application fee.

Citizenship is "a very important step for the Asian American community because it allows them to become more integrated in America," said Diep. "This integration allows the AAPI community to become more visible in U.S. cities, increasingly getting elected to public office."

According to a report released last year by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center, the number of Asian American public officials has reached historic levels, with more than 4,000 Asian Americans holding public office in 39 states and the federal government.

For Zen Santos, who came to Los Angeles from the Philippines in 2008, becoming an American citizen allowed her to have a say in the future of her new country.

"I felt that I lacked something - to be involved, and that is to vote," Santos told reporters on Wednesday.

But when Santos lost her job, she found that she couldn't afford the application fee. That's when Santos sought help from the Filipino American Service Group, Inc., (FASGI) in Los Angeles, which is part of the New Americans Campaign. The group helped Santos get a fee waiver, and she became a citizen in 2013.

"I am American now, and I can vote now," Santos said. "I have to get involved in deciding for this country where I live now."

For more information about the New Americans Campaign, go to:newamericanscampaign.org

Link to article - http://tinyurl.com/orn8v85

Edited by zuluweta

Check my timeline for K-1 visa & AOS details

Conditional Permanent Resident: 16 September 2014

Conditional GC Expires: 16 September 2016

ROC Journey (CA Service Center)

2016-Sep-14: I-751 form, check, supporting docs sent USPS Priority Express

2016-Sep-15: ROC application received & signed for by Lakelieh

2016-Sep-15: NOA receipt date

2016-Sep-19: $590 check cashed by USCIS

2016-Sep-20: NOA/ 1-year extension letter received in mail

2018-Feb-26: ROC case transferred to local office

2018-Mar-06: ROC approved via USCIS website (WAC status check)

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Asian Immigrants Becoming US Citizens at High Rate

by Elena Shore, New America Media/Huffington Post, June 2, 2015

04AFFIRM_SPAN-articleLarge-v2.jpg

image_(2).jpeg

For the first time in decades, the number of immigrants coming to the United States from China and India outnumbers those coming from Mexico. It's a historic shift that has caught the attention of service providers across the country working to help immigrants become U.S. citizens.

"We've seen a huge change in recent immigration," Jeanne Batalova, senior policy researcher at Migration Policy Institute, told reporters on a national press call Wednesday. The call was hosted by the New Americans Campaign, in collaboration with New America Media and the National Immigration Forum.

Of 1.2 million recent immigrants who came to the United States in 2013, 147,000 immigrants came from China, the leading country of origin, followed by 129,000 immigrants from India, and then 125,000 immigrants from Mexico.

Asian Americans also have among the highest naturalization rates in the United States: Less than half of all immigrants in the United States (47 percent) are naturalized U.S. citizens, while the percentage for Asian immigrants is significantly higher, at 59 percent. The proportion of naturalized U.S. citizens is highest for Vietnamese (76 percent) and Taiwanese (74 percent), followed by Filipinos (68 percent), Koreans (59 percent), Chinese (51 percent) and Indians (47 percent).

These numbers are high despite the fact that some countries, like China, still do not offer dual citizenship. Others, like the Philippines (in 2003) and South Korea (in 2010), have made changes to their dual citizenship requirements.

Yet even for those who do not have access to dual citizenship, the benefits of U.S. citizenship can be very attractive -- including security and protection from deportation, the ability to travel freely, the right to vote and run for political office, and the ability to sponsor a wider range of family members for immigration to the United States.

Citizenship also brings economic benefits, said Batalova. Studies show that naturalized citizens earn more than non-citizen counterparts, are less likely to be unemployed and are better represented in high-skilled jobs.

Still, many immigrants face barriers that can prevent them from becoming citizens, such as limited English proficiency or limited income, said Jannette Diep, executive director of Boat People SOS-Houston. Boat People SOS is part of the New Americans Campaign, a national coalition of over 100 organizations that helps immigrants overcome these barriers to make citizenship more accessible. For example, the campaign offers free workshops to help people apply for citizenship, provides English language and civics classes, and helps people apply for fee waivers if they can't afford the $680 application fee.

Citizenship is "a very important step for the Asian American community because it allows them to become more integrated in America," said Diep. "This integration allows the AAPI community to become more visible in U.S. cities, increasingly getting elected to public office."

According to a report released last year by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center, the number of Asian American public officials has reached historic levels, with more than 4,000 Asian Americans holding public office in 39 states and the federal government.

For Zen Santos, who came to Los Angeles from the Philippines in 2008, becoming an American citizen allowed her to have a say in the future of her new country.

"I felt that I lacked something - to be involved, and that is to vote," Santos told reporters on Wednesday.

But when Santos lost her job, she found that she couldn't afford the application fee. That's when Santos sought help from the Filipino American Service Group, Inc., (FASGI) in Los Angeles, which is part of the New Americans Campaign. The group helped Santos get a fee waiver, and she became a citizen in 2013.

"I am American now, and I can vote now," Santos said. "I have to get involved in deciding for this country where I live now."

For more information about the New Americans Campaign, go to:newamericanscampaign.org

Link to article - http://tinyurl.com/orn8v85

I get a lot of Patel customers. They own every hotel and convince store in town . The Vietnamese seem to own a lot of restaurants and nail places The common factor is that they seem to come here and work their tales off help each other and thrive

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My wife and I are about to pad the stats for yet another newly minted Asian American.


B and J K-1 story

  • April 2004 met online
  • July 16, 2006 Met in person on her birthday in United Arab Emirates
  • August 4, 2006 sent certified mail I-129F packet Neb SC
  • August 9, 2006 NOA1
  • August 21, 2006 received NOA1 in mail
  • October 4, 5, 7, 13 & 17 2006 Touches! 50 day address change... Yes Judith is beautiful, quit staring at her passport photo and approve us!!! Shaming works! LOL
  • October 13, 2006 NOA2! November 2, 2006 NOA2? Huh? NVC already processed and sent us on to Abu Dhabi Consulate!
  • February 12, 2007 Abu Dhabi Interview SUCCESS!!! February 14 Visa in hand!
  • March 6, 2007 she is here!
  • MARCH 14, 2007 WE ARE MARRIED!!!
  • May 5, 2007 Sent AOS/EAD packet
  • May 11, 2007 NOA1 AOS/EAD
  • June 7, 2007 Biometrics appointment
  • June 8, 2007 first post biometrics touch, June 11, next touch...
  • August 1, 2007 AOS Interview! APPROVED!! EAD APPROVED TOO...
  • August 6, 2007 EAD card and Welcome Letter received!
  • August 13, 2007 GREEN CARD received!!! 375 days since mailing the I-129F!

    Remove Conditions:

  • May 1, 2009 first day to file
  • May 9, 2009 mailed I-751 to USCIS CS

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My wife and I are about to pad the stats for yet another newly minted Asian American.

Is somebody parturient? If so, congratulations!


06-04-2007 = TSC stamps postal return-receipt for I-129f.

06-11-2007 = NOA1 date (unknown to me).

07-20-2007 = Phoned Immigration Officer; got WAC#; where's NOA1?

09-25-2007 = Touch (first-ever).

09-28-2007 = NOA1, 23 days after their 45-day promise to send it (grrrr).

10-20 & 11-14-2007 = Phoned ImmOffs; "still pending."

12-11-2007 = 180 days; file is "between workstations, may be early Jan."; touches 12/11 & 12/12.

12-18-2007 = Call; file is with Division 9 ofcr. (bckgrnd check); e-prompt to shake it; touch.

12-19-2007 = NOA2 by e-mail & web, dated 12-18-07 (187 days; 201 per VJ); in mail 12/24/07.

01-09-2008 = File from USCIS to NVC, 1-4-08; NVC creates file, 1/15/08; to consulate 1/16/08.

01-23-2008 = Consulate gets file; outdated Packet 4 mailed to fiancee 1/27/08; rec'd 3/3/08.

04-29-2008 = Fiancee's 4-min. consular interview, 8:30 a.m.; much evidence brought but not allowed to be presented (consul: "More proof! Second interview! Bring your fiance!").

05-05-2008 = Infuriating $12 call to non-English-speaking consulate appointment-setter.

05-06-2008 = Better $12 call to English-speaker; "joint" interview date 6/30/08 (my selection).

06-30-2008 = Stokes Interrogations w/Ecuadorian (not USC); "wait 2 weeks; we'll mail her."

07-2008 = Daily calls to DOS: "currently processing"; 8/05 = Phoned consulate, got Section Chief; wrote him.

08-07-08 = E-mail from consulate, promising to issue visa "as soon as we get her passport" (on 8/12, per DHL).

08-27-08 = Phoned consulate (they "couldn't find" our file); visa DHL'd 8/28; in hand 9/1; through POE on 10/9 with NO hassles(!).

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Much more illegal aliens entering USA per day from Mexico border, than Asians becoming US Citizens

The way you tell it, Mexico is a wonderland. Why would they ever sneak over here? :goofy:

As long as they are strippers, hey;)

Got em!!!!! :rofl:


“Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.” – Coretta Scott King

"Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge." -Toni Morrison

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

President-Obama-jpg.jpg

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The way you tell it, Mexico is a wonderland. Why would they ever sneak over here? :goofy:

Probably for the money and free medical and free education that the US Taxpayers get to pay for.

They are immune to most state laws and police will not write them tickets or arrest them unless it a major crime.

Heck if I was from Mexico I would come to USA and rape the system also.........

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Probably for the money and free medical and free education that the US Taxpayers get to pay for.

They are immune to most state laws and police will not write them tickets or arrest them unless it a major crime.

Heck if I was from Mexico I would come to USA and rape the system also.........

And yet when I pointed out how bad it was over there, you were like, I love going to Mexico!

I don't think anyone from there thinks this. A lot of them just want a better life for themselves and their families. Strippers and prostitutes have to eat and live too...


“Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.” – Coretta Scott King

"Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge." -Toni Morrison

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

President-Obama-jpg.jpg

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And yet when I pointed out how bad it was over there, you were like, I love going to Mexico!

I don't think anyone from there thinks this. A lot of them just want a better life for themselves and their families. Strippers and prostitutes have to eat and live too...

People from all over the world want to come to USA, It's called the American Dream. I have made 20 plus trips to Mexico and I would say maybe 14 trips to Philippines. I would say many want to go to USA from Philippines for a better life. But what the people in Mexico and in Philippines don't understand or see is they have a pretty good life where they live.

It's called wanting what you don't have, Like the grass is always greener scenario........

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People from all over the world want to come to USA, It's called the American Dream. I have made 20 plus trips to Mexico and I would say maybe 14 trips to Philippines. I would say many want to go to USA from Philippines for a better life. But what the people in Mexico and in Philippines don't understand or see is they have a pretty good life where they live.

It's called wanting what you don't have, Like the grass is always greener scenario........

I know a lot of retirees that go to Thailand or the PI to retire. I've also lived in quite a few overseas countries for a couple of years. Living here is nice, but I could just as easily live somewhere else just like I live here.

There are a few places in Mexico that are complete war zones. Also, poverty here is NOTHING compared to poverty in other places. So I can see why folks make the trek here.

Those folks come here and work for almost nothing and live in squalor.


“Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.” – Coretta Scott King

"Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge." -Toni Morrison

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

President-Obama-jpg.jpg

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