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Sponsoring partner's F-1 visa

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Hi everyone,

Recently, my former partner (mid-20s, Peruvian, male) has been interested in coming to the states to study at an intensive English program to improve his English for the TOEFL and get a feel for American universities, since he is interested in pursuing a masters or PhD here. As it is more than 20 hours/week, he will need to apply for an F-1 visa. However, he really doesn't have a lot of money saved up despite working for 1.5 years because his pay is so low. I am interested in sponsoring him and having him stay with me during his studies to reduce costs, since I am financially capable of supporting both of us and live near one of the locations he has been considering. I have more than enough to cover his costs here.

To be clear, we have no plans to marry as we are not currently dating, but I'm worried that listing myself (a young, unmarried female) as his sponsor will give that impression and then they won't grant his visa. Is this going to be a problem?

Further, I'm worried that if we do change our minds, get back together and potentially decide to get married, we'll be flagged for fraud. This is a secondary concern.

Thanks in advance, wise ones.

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I have seen many similar posts on VJ.

Nothing to stop him applying, just costs him the fee. Let us know what happens.

Just a thought, but if he can not fund a language school, how will he fund a University?

Edited by Boiler

“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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No use applying if he isn't going to be granted a visa. I have read through a number of other posts related to this issue but have not found one that covers our particular issue.

In his field of study, it is common for students to be granted assistantships to cover the cost of tuition, plus a modest stipend.

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Odd, like I said has come up here many times.

You have to pay to play.

Unless his specialism is precognition.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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I agree with Boiler - no one here can tell you that it is either going to be a problem or not be a problem. We are not the ones adjudicating the visa application.

All you can do is try

good luck


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Hi everyone,

Recently, my former partner (mid-20s, Peruvian, male) has been interested in coming to the states to study at an intensive English program to improve his English for the TOEFL and get a feel for American universities, since he is interested in pursuing a masters or PhD here. As it is more than 20 hours/week, he will need to apply for an F-1 visa. However, he really doesn't have a lot of money saved up despite working for 1.5 years because his pay is so low. I am interested in sponsoring him and having him stay with me during his studies to reduce costs, since I am financially capable of supporting both of us and live near one of the locations he has been considering. I have more than enough to cover his costs here.

To be clear, we have no plans to marry as we are not currently dating, but I'm worried that listing myself (a young, unmarried female) as his sponsor will give that impression and then they won't grant his visa. Is this going to be a problem?

Further, I'm worried that if we do change our minds, get back together and potentially decide to get married, we'll be flagged for fraud. This is a secondary concern.

Thanks in advance, wise ones.

For the F-1, he first needs to be accepted to become a student at the college he will study English, they will then furnish him with an I-20 that details costs: tuition, books, room, board, medical insurance, etc; that he would have to demonstrate he can cover (for at least the 1st year if my memory is any good).

Is at that point that your sponsorship in room/board would come in to reduce the total he would have to demonstrate. The CO would likely want to know how the two of you met and the circumstances of your sponsorship.

SInce there is mention of a master/PhD; I'd say that it could be more effective to determine whether he can get acceptance in a college for that master/PhD in which part of the commitment is to carry English courses is the first few months before starting the degree coursework. Most colleges require the TOEFL, but there are many that grant acceptance on a low-score (low meaning borderline with the minimums required) TOEFL provided taking English courses at same college as remediation before the actual degree work starts.

Assuming that is positive, there is then the question of how would he cover that financially, and given a masters/PhD, many colleges can provide some form of financial assistance, either a Teaching assistantshio or a Research assistantship. A lot depends on the degree. A STEM degree will probably have much more chances.

Nothing wrong to test the waters with an English course work, but it might be more challenging.

Edited by Gosia & Tito

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